Law School Discussion

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11
Law School Applications / Re: Transferring between similar rank schools?
« on: January 23, 2010, 12:23:32 PM »
There isn't enough data on transfers to be able to give you any real answer.  People suspect that if you're attempting a "lateral" transfer you should be at least median at your current school AND have a compelling reason for the transfer.

You'd probably be safe if you're at around the top 25% mark with a decent reason.

But transfer applications are a toss up.  The only thing we can say is do your best and apply.

12
Where should I go next fall? / Re: GW vs. UCD
« on: January 18, 2010, 09:52:54 PM »
With that kind of offer from GW, you'd be crazy to pick Davis (unless they somehow match -- and even then it's a close call).

However, I'm assuming that you applied to more than just these two schools.  I'm sure you'd have a shot at UCLA/USC, possibly Berkeley?  I just want to know what other options you're working with b/c it just can't be GW and Davis.

I understand that your goal is to work for the government upon graduation and, if you're talking about Federal government, then you'd be at a huge advantage going to school in DC.  But, that doesn't mean you can't get good government jobs coming from another school.

I'd also caution you to make decisions based primarily on what you think you want to do after you graduate.  I'll tell you that most law students come into law school not really knowing what the practice of law entails (and we don't really learn that at school anyway).  I'd say that the majority of people change their minds numerous times as to what they want to do.  Some come into law school wanting to do Public interest, but then realize the want to work at a big law firm.  Some want to go to a big law firm and realize they want to be a prosecutor -- you get the drift.  My advice is that you make your decision on a combination of factors:  location, cost, what you think you might be interested in doing, and "rank" (by this i mean the relative prestige of the school).

Either way, you have a great "safety" in GWU with that scholarship, so congratulations and good luck with your decision.

Ya, thanks

I am waiting on UCLA/USC and a few others, but was just thinking about this particular dilemma in the meantime xD.

Well, in this current situation, GW hands down.

13
Where should I go next fall? / Re: GW vs. UCD
« on: January 18, 2010, 06:20:34 PM »
With that kind of offer from GW, you'd be crazy to pick Davis (unless they somehow match -- and even then it's a close call).

However, I'm assuming that you applied to more than just these two schools.  I'm sure you'd have a shot at UCLA/USC, possibly Berkeley?  I just want to know what other options you're working with b/c it just can't be GW and Davis.

I understand that your goal is to work for the government upon graduation and, if you're talking about Federal government, then you'd be at a huge advantage going to school in DC.  But, that doesn't mean you can't get good government jobs coming from another school.

I'd also caution you to make decisions based primarily on what you think you want to do after you graduate.  I'll tell you that most law students come into law school not really knowing what the practice of law entails (and we don't really learn that at school anyway).  I'd say that the majority of people change their minds numerous times as to what they want to do.  Some come into law school wanting to do Public interest, but then realize the want to work at a big law firm.  Some want to go to a big law firm and realize they want to be a prosecutor -- you get the drift.  My advice is that you make your decision on a combination of factors:  location, cost, what you think you might be interested in doing, and "rank" (by this i mean the relative prestige of the school).

Either way, you have a great "safety" in GWU with that scholarship, so congratulations and good luck with your decision.

14
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Can anyone explain this flaw question?
« on: January 16, 2010, 07:58:42 PM »
Just to point out quickly, the real point of the question isn't really the way they phrase the answer.  It speaks to having a basic understanding of probability.  If you have a certain probability of an independent event, then subsequent events are not affected by the previous one.

For example, the probability of getting heads when flipping a coin is 50%.  Thus, just because you have gotten five tails in a row, it doesn't mean that the probability of getting tails on the sixth try is any less (it still remains 50%).

I really think the question is rewarding this type of understanding -- not so much in the way they phrase it (although, that certainly is a part of it).

Oh good point.  I totally didn't catch that when reading the description of the stem. 

what you say is true, but it doesn't apply to this particular question.  flipping a coin is always an independent event, so it doesn't matter what happens before it.  In the case of this LSAT question, since about half are approved, knowing how many have not been approved could make a difference, but only if you know the total amount that are being considered in the first place.



15
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Can anyone explain this flaw question?
« on: January 15, 2010, 12:51:54 PM »
Just to point out quickly, the real point of the question isn't really the way they phrase the answer.  It speaks to having a basic understanding of probability.  If you have a certain probability of an independent event, then subsequent events are not affected by the previous one.

For example, the probability of getting heads when flipping a coin is 50%.  Thus, just because you have gotten five tails in a row, it doesn't mean that the probability of getting tails on the sixth try is any less (it still remains 50%).

I really think the question is rewarding this type of understanding -- not so much in the way they phrase it (although, that certainly is a part of it).

16
Transferring / Re: Open transfer invitation
« on: December 03, 2009, 08:02:03 PM »
told me if i got a certain gpa (a pretty low one) I had a spot waiting

I've never heard of that.  How did that affect your decision on where you went the first year?  I assume that you tried to go somewhere with a somewhat lenient curve.

17
Transferring / Re: Open transfer invitation
« on: December 03, 2009, 07:48:51 PM »
What's an "open invitation to transfer"?  A T10 school basically said that you were admitted after your first year?

18
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Is Your Grade Always Determined By One Exam
« on: December 03, 2009, 07:45:39 PM »
Some of my classes had midterms, some had papers, and some have multi-part exams, so it's not like your grade always rides on one question.  One of my finals this semester will have a T/F section and multiple-choice section in addition to the issue spotter.  

That's good news. I don't like my chances in the courses that are all long answer
essays. I'll have to pile up on courses like Accounting For Lawyers, Wills and Trusts,
Taxation of Business Entities, etc. By the way, do you know if I'll have a tough time
passing the bar if I specialize like crazy in Finance and Tax type courses? I'm guessing
that they'd make anything that's super critical a mandatory class.

You might want to take a look at some exams for first year courses as well.

Good idea. I'm going to do that. Those sound like the toughest ones. I'm almost afraid
to look, because those are the ones I see everyone discussing, that have been freaking me out,
and that's where I think I'll really get buried - 1L, where the grades are most important.


Thanks for all the info guys.



I think you should try to change your perspective on the one exam, long essay format.  In many ways, you can make these tests simpler for yourself by adjusting the way you think about the course.  I think the biggest difficulty people have on the long, fact-pattern type questions is that you're no longer given the "questions."

Whereas when we were younger all the way through college, our teachers would ask the questions, on law school exams, you only get a simple question (which requires you to come up with all the important questions and possible answers that are needed to answer that one question -- kind of confusing).

But once you start to think like this, these fact patterns became MUCH easier, your thinking becomes more focused and you are able to write a coherent reply to the exam.

My point:  don't worry about the one exam, long answer format.  Focus on things you can do to make that type of test easy for you.

19
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Is Your Grade Always Determined By One Exam
« on: December 02, 2009, 01:24:45 PM »
I like answering easy questions, so here goes:

Let me qualify this by saying that this is what I'm used to at my school:
For the most part, the classes you take (which have a a final exam, as opposed to papers) will only have one final exam.  Legal writing differs (b/c it is a "paper" course).  I think this remains true for the remainder of your law school career.

However, I have heard of some law schools which actually have midterms.  And without trying to degrade any law school, I think it's mostly schools which are lower ranked.  But, this is certainly in the minority. 

As far as the form of the exam goes, it really depends.  I'm mostly used to getting fact-patterns and the question is asking to discuss legal issues that arise.  I have had exams which have a portion of the test as multiple choice (but never an exam where the test was completely MC or even more than 50%).

20
I'm just spit-balling here:

SMU, UMiami/Florida/FSU (I know these are three schools, but they seem to dominate the FL market), USD, McGeorge (really only other competition is Davis), 'Bama, Emory, Minnesota ...

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