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Messages - ShadWhitmore

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51
I'm still pending at Stanford and Yale - I went complete at both schools in early November. That's over 4 months ago!

And the worst part is I'll probably end up getting rejected at both. :-\

52
Law School Applications / Re: Chicago Merit Aid
« on: March 10, 2008, 04:16:40 PM »
I got offered 50k + 10k contingent PI. Do you think I can negotiate up to 64K with the Darrow? What's the consensus method, mail, e-mail?

Me too! I'm way excited. Let me know if they bump it up to $64K - I might try a similar tactic.

I would recommend email (or phone call?), but I'm probably not the right person to ask. I tried in vain to get my scholarship at Michigan improved.

53
Law School Applications / Re: Chicago Merit Aid
« on: March 10, 2008, 12:39:43 PM »
Someone on LSN posted a $64K Chicago scholarship yesterday. That seems to be the same amount as many of the scholarships last year.

He says he's from Chicago; maybe they sent out some awards in the mail on Friday. I'd be interested to know if he's also applying for need-based aid because it seems that may delay the process…

Seems like my award was mailed out Friday as well. I am also applying for need-based aid and they said that info would come "in Spring."

Congrats on the scholarship!

54
Law School Applications / Re: Chicago Merit Aid
« on: March 09, 2008, 03:14:58 PM »
Someone on LSN posted a $64K Chicago scholarship yesterday. That seems to be the same amount as many of the scholarships last year.

He says he's from Chicago; maybe they sent out some awards in the mail on Friday. I'd be interested to know if he's also applying for need-based aid because it seems that may delay the process…

55
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Cornell or Vandy
« on: March 09, 2008, 02:58:39 PM »
According to the Princeton Review, Cornell law students study the most per day:

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2007/10/princeton-rev-2.html

Perhaps this is why the school is perceived as being competitive.

See approximately 20 posts scattered throughout this board about how Princeton Review's rankings are flawed and incorrect, and how this particular one just isn't true.

This seems to be a sensitive subject. ;)

I wasn't saying the Princeton Review's rankings are accurate. I was simply offering a possible answer to question about why Cornell is perceived (at least on this board) as being competitive. I'm sorry if this study-hours-per-day ranking has been discussed elsewhere.

That being said, I am seriously considering Cornell, and the school's supposed competiveness does not bother me. (Nor, by the way, does Ithaca; I would LOVE to live there!)

56
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Cornell or Vandy
« on: March 08, 2008, 07:18:56 PM »
According to the Princeton Review, Cornell law students study the most per day:

http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2007/10/princeton-rev-2.html

Perhaps this is why the school is perceived as being competitive.

57
PS: None of this applies to Epstein. In fact, nothing applies to Epstein.

Epstein sounds like a character. Hasn't he been around for a while?

I have no idea what any of you are talking about.

I think all this debate of Law and Econ v. other theories and liberal v. conservative is totally overblown.  It should not be as important a factor in choosing law schools as many law school applicants make it to be.

I'm not trying to say these issues are paramount when choosing a law school; after all, I think law & econ and conservatism is pretty pervasive at all top law schools (thanks, in part, to John M. Olin). I just find the application of economics to law fascinating. It's the main reason I'm interested in law and legal academia.

58
Hazard: Your quotes too long for me to insert it, but...

I really like what you said about how professors teach. I think it's fine, natural, and even desirable for professors to have normativistic (is that a word?) views, but I think positivism is appropriate for the classroom. Even though, as I stated above, I would consider law & econ a somewhat conservative approach because of the underlying economic assumptions (non-compensation in potential Pareto improvements, giving a dollar to Bill Gates is as “beneficial” as giving a dollar to the poor, it is possible to place a monetary value on health and the environment, etc.), I would still consider law & econ a positivist approach (feel free to disagree, I will probably still attend U of C even if some current student trashes my arguments  :D). However, philosophers of science are currently debating whether true positivism can exist, so I think it’s important to recognize the underlying assumptions of any method.

It does seem there is more room for interpretation in the law than in other subjects like the natural/physical sciences, econ, etc. (Isn’t that what Critical Legal Studies is all about? – I just remember reading about CLS on an LSAT reading comprehension prompt. :D) How much do professors’ political slants come through as they teach?

59
I'm getting excited to visit Chicago in April... I have two unrelated questions:

How strong is the environmental law program? Is the approach more liberal ("Save the trees at whatever costs") or conservative (i.e., tradable pollution permits)?

What program do you use for exams? If it's a specific software program, does it have spell-check? I only ask because I constantly misspell words while typing...

I know a lot of other schools have set up (IMO, gimmicky) "programs," but we don't really have them at Chicago.  You just take whatever classes you want, and they make sure to keep a handful of topical classes available each quarter .  I haven't taken any of the enviro ones yet, so I can't speak from personal experience, but I would guess that most of the professors would be much closer to the latter style.  I wouldn't call that conservative, though; it is more law & econ than conservative.  The conservative/liberal divide comes in how tight you want those caps to be or how much you value the environment vs. industry.  Cap & trade is a means, not an end.

As to the second question, Chicago treats its students like the adults they are and doesn't use any special software.  You just type your exams on Word and e-mail them in when you're done.  That means you don't have to lug 50 page outline printouts into the room and skim through them by hand; you can just Ctrl+F in a separate Word doc.

I would consider law & econ a fairly conservative approach, at least in the sense of conservative economics. After all, law & econ tends to promote laissez-fair resolutions (a la Coase) rather than socialist, command-and-control type solutions. Also, it seems a lot of liberal environmentalists argue in favor of pollution taxes because tradable permits give polluters the right to pollute instead of simply punishing them. Of course, assuming minor income effects and transaction costs (both of which may be large in polluter-receptor scenarios), the same amount of pollution will be abated in either case.

Sorry, we just went through about a hundred articles on Coase in my grad program.

And, that's nice you can use Word for exams. I think some schools have programs that lock down the rest of your computer.

60
I'm getting excited to visit Chicago in April... I have two unrelated questions:

How strong is the environmental law program? Is the approach more liberal ("Save the trees at whatever costs") or conservative (i.e., tradable pollution permits)?

What program do you use for exams? If it's a specific software program, does it have spell-check? I only ask because I constantly misspell words while typing...

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