Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - giveme170

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 32
21
Studying for the LSAT / Re: 154 LSAT + 3.65 GPA = ???
« on: October 29, 2007, 03:48:04 AM »
also please don't reply to use the gpa/lsat calc.  thats already been done.

if you've used the calculator, why are you asking this question? any advice you get will just be speculation based off of the calculators.

good point. lol

22
Studying for the LSAT / score going down....
« on: October 29, 2007, 03:43:55 AM »
I have been taking testmasters course for the past 3 weeks. My scored dropped 7 points on my second diagnostic from what it was on the first one. This made me go hmmm.... Is this because I am only learning the basic approach to each type of questions?

23
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Is English your second language?
« on: October 26, 2007, 05:13:58 AM »
Well, English is my native tongue, but I have many friends who have English as a second language.  One of them, a Korean, started out in the low 140s, but worked her way up to a 161.  Considering the situation, I thought that was an admirable feat.  There are two things I remember when asking them how they did it.  One was that once they found there was a pattern among LG and LR questions, they were more easily able to predict the correct answer.  Yes, all the books say this, but it's easier said than done.  You mention that you've done about 50 prep tests.  Go over some of them and look for some patterns among similar-type questions, if you haven't done so already.  You may notice the the wrong answers normally tend to look the same: mistaken negation, mistaken reversal, etc.  The second thing I remember them saying is that they initially had the same problem as you, they needed a dictionary because the test makers use so many obscure words.  I would say this isn't a result of any kind of language barrier, because even native speakers don't know a lot of the words on the test.  But even ESL speakers know the words surrounding the obscure word.  Figure out the meaning in context and you won't need a dictionary for strange words.

One last thing.  5-7 wrong in each LR section isn't so bad.  I don't know what you're aiming for, but it's easy to score in the 160s if you're only getting 12-13 wrong in the two LR sections.  But you'd have to be able to get through the 4th RC section.  Not sure what your memory's like, but a good memory can compensate for a less quicker reading speed.

Very good point. The bastards do know how to confuse even native-speakers with words like these.  ;D

24
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Is English your second language?
« on: October 25, 2007, 10:21:33 PM »
It all depends on how good your English is. If you only spent couple years in the US, obviously English barriers would still exist. If you spent more than 5 years and attended college in the US and received the same education as Americans, I don't think that person would have any problems with LSAT language. Vocabs are not particularly difficult in LSAT, most of it is logics. I have a Chinese friend who scored 177, and he came to the US in 2003. I really think it is rather about how fast you think than how fast you read. Reading fast would not do you any good on the LSAT if you do not feel comfortable with the underlying logics. According to my friend, doing well on the LSAT is mostly 'how fast you react to the given information'.

25
Studying for the LSAT / Re: LR Q challenge
« on: October 25, 2007, 12:12:11 AM »
Marko, excellent explanation! You are another LSAT sage, huh  :) I think I mainly got confused because of the first sentence. What is the significance of the first sentence in this argument? Is it just there to confuse people? Thanks to both of you. Its really helpful.

26
Studying for the LSAT / LR Q challenge
« on: October 24, 2007, 10:38:19 PM »
 Large-scale government projects designed to benefit everyone- such as roads, schools, and bridges- usually benefit some small segments of society, initially at least, more than others. The more equally and widely political power is distributed among the citizenry, the less likely such projects are to receive funding. Hence, government by referendum rather than by means of elected representatives tends to diminish, not enhance, the welfare of a society.

Which is the assumption?

A) Large-scale government projects sometimes enhance the welfare of society.

E) Government by referendum is the only way to distribute political power equally and widely.

Can someone explain what is going on in this problem? I did not really understand the logical structure of this argument. Thanks in advance.  :)

27
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Improving on RC
« on: October 23, 2007, 09:29:49 PM »
I normally miss about 5 questions in the RC section, so I'm not exactly perfect, but when I started out I was getting as much as 12 wrong.  So in the time I've been studying I must have been doing something right.

My advice would be to read the passage carefully before doing anything else.  Don't even skim the questions before hand, because if you do you'll subconsciously be on the lookout for certain words, and you'll miss the organizational layout, and that's the last thing you want to do.  What you want to do instead is read the entire passage as carefully as you can, and quickly too.  By the time you get to the detail questions, things should already be clicking in your mind.  Say for example the detail question asks what the word "obscure" in "line 27" is intended to do.  By this time, you should already know the organization of the passage and how each paragraph relates to each other.  So all you have to do is go back to line 27 and see how it relates to the paragraph.  And then you will know how it relates to the passage.  The problem with just going to line 27 without knowing the organization of the passage is that you may think you know how it relates to the few lines surrounding it, which just isn't good enough, because the direction of the argument too often changes.  Although the detail question specifically asks about line 27, you may have to read lines 50-55, for example, to get the correct answer.

You mentioned you're pressed for time, but reading the entire passage first (and carefully) is the best time-saver in the long run.

Hey thanks for the explanation. It is really helpful. I always tend to read a little too fast, and did not train myself enough to focus on the structure I guess. What you said about the detail/line questions really do make sense. I will try reading for the sctructure more. Do you think reading for structure is also the way to solve extension/ parellel questions? I also have trouble with these.

28
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Improving on RC
« on: October 23, 2007, 04:06:51 AM »
 For me, what's really frustrating is that these detail questions are indeed so detailed that you literally have to reread those parts in the passage, and that consumes A LOT OF TIME, at least for me. I am tired of doing the passages without seeing any improvement. If I really take as much time as I would like on each passage, I would get all the questions correct, but then what use is that since the real LSAT only allows 35 minutes. I am so discouraged.  :(

29
Studying for the LSAT / Improving on RC
« on: October 23, 2007, 03:58:48 AM »
I almost always miss 1~2 questions per passage on RC. I rarely miss main point/tone questions, but detail/extension questions are giving me trouble because it takes so long for me to choose the right answer (and sometimes i choose the wrong ones). It seems like no matter what I do, I don't seem to improve much on RC. I read the Nova's, the sparknotes, and some of the stuff on here. I found the sparknotes to be pretty helful, but applying everything I learned from it would consume way too much time. Studying for RC is so discouraging because I don't seem to improve at all. Improving on LR was so much easier. Can someone suggest anything that mihgt be helpful? Should I just continue to do passage after passage even though I don't see any improvements? (Yes, that sounded dumb) Please help!

30
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Is a 161 a great score?
« on: October 21, 2007, 09:08:04 AM »
OMG! Jeffort is so cute!  :D

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 32