Law School Discussion

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Messages - giveme170

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11
Studying for the LSAT / Re: where is everyone?
« on: November 06, 2007, 10:38:33 AM »
I was here all week reading the posts but never felt like posting any.  :P Too much stress from studying.

12
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Find the flaw!
« on: November 06, 2007, 10:37:12 AM »
Thank you all for the help! I like Lindberg's explanation in particular.  :)

13
Studying for the LSAT / Re: What's the Max Point Jump?
« on: November 06, 2007, 04:37:31 AM »
It all depends on where you start. I think it's possible to improve as much as you are willing to work for. As for me, My original diagnostic was a 146. I screwed around with my prep and got a 152 on the Dec. 06 test. Big mistake. After that, I made the choice to buckle down and put in the work and it has paid great dividends. Before the Sept. test I was preping at 168-169 consistantly. I had a bad day (-8 on games, normally - 1) and got a 163 so I'm retaking. The great thing about it is that I have the chance to get even better before December. It's an opportunity.

I'm not that smart. I don't think I'm diferent from anyone else. Definitely not trying to talk myself up. Their are a lot of people doing better than me. The point is that it's possible. If there were ever a time to insert the "if I can do it anyone can" cliche this is it.

Does it work for everyone? Of course not. There are countless stories of people who beat their heads against the wall for months and never improve. Who knows maybe I screw up another section in Dec. and don't help myself at all. Nothing is guaranteed. It is however resonable to believe the only limits you have are the ones that you place on yourself. Need a 25 point increase? Go for it but be willing to put in the time.

I will say that those last few points are the toughest to get. After countless 169's I would probably give my first born for a one point increase. A 178 would probably work for me. :)

Hey, how long did you prep? anything above 170 would make me so happy.  :)

14
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Mercer University
« on: November 05, 2007, 10:43:31 PM »
I don't think this is relevant, but Nancy Grace went to Mercer Law I think.  :P

15
Studying for the LSAT / Re: What's the Max Point Jump?
« on: November 05, 2007, 10:39:42 PM »
I improved 17 points so far. If I can improve on RC and my timing, I think it is very possible for me to improve 5~8 more points.

16
Studying for the LSAT / Find the flaw!
« on: November 05, 2007, 09:01:02 PM »
It is not correct that the people of the United States, relatively to comparable countries, are the most lightly taxed. True, the United States has the lowest tax, as percent of gross domestic product, of the Western industrialized countries, but tax rates alone do not tell the whole story. People in the United States pay out of pocket for many goods and services provided from tax revenues elsewhere. Consider universal health care, which is an entitlement supported by tax revenues in every other Western industrialized country. United States government health-care expenditures are equivalent to about 5 percent of the gross domestic product, but private health-care expenditures represent another 7 percent. This 7 percent, then, amounts to a tax.

The argument concerning whether the people of the US are most lightly taxed is most vulnerable to which one of the following criticisms?

A) It bases a comparison on percentages rather than on absolute numbers.

B) It unreasonably extends the application of a key term.

E) It sets up a dichotomy between alternatives that are not exclusive.


Could someone break down the argument and explain why each answer choice is right/wrong? I did understand the argument, but do not find a drastic flaw with it. Thanks in advance.  ;)

17
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Getting into law school vs. Med school
« on: November 02, 2007, 09:41:18 AM »
I studied for the MCAT before, I did not feel that MCAT was necessarily too difficult, it was just that there were so much to do. Studying for the LSAT is ok even though some stuff I learned were pretty complex, simply because therre really isn't that much to learn.

18
Studying for the LSAT / Getting into law school vs. Med school
« on: November 02, 2007, 09:27:32 AM »
 It seems like most people who scored over 170 have studied less than 3 months. Most of these people would get into pretty good law school unless they have a horrible GPA. Would you people say getting into law school is considerably easier than getting into med schools? It seems like many people who scored over 170 (including people I know) did not necessarily study hard to get their score, whereas most of my pre-med friends are spending endless hours in the library to get those A's on their organic chem classes. I myself studied for the LSAT for the past few months and made 15+ points increase on my score, but I am really starting to think all of this is happening way too fast and easy, at least compared to what my premed friends are going through. Is it like getting into law school is much easier than getting into med school? Are med students comparatively more diligent than law students? I am just curious about what you guys think.  :)

19
Studying for the LSAT / LRQ
« on: November 01, 2007, 02:48:52 AM »
 Hana said she was not going to invite her brothers to her birthday party. However, among the gifts Hana received at her party was a recording in which she had expressed an interest. Since her brothers had planned to give her that recording, at least some of Hana's brothers must have been among the guests at Hana's Birthday party after all.

Reasoning error in the argument:

B) treats the fact that of someone's presence at a given event as a guarantee that that person had a legitimate reason to be at that event.

D) fails to establish that something true of some people is true of only those people

E) overlooks the possibility that a person's interest in one kind of thing is compatible with that person's interest in a different kind of thing.

Could someone break down the argument and explain what function each part of the argument plays? I think the CR would make much more sense to me if I understood the reasoning structure... Thanks for the help!

20
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Best way to do Detail Questions on RC
« on: November 01, 2007, 02:42:34 AM »
Stop fighting, children.  :)

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