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Messages - NYU2011

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41
Law School Applications / Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« on: March 09, 2008, 01:50:21 PM »
tag

42
Law School Applications / Re: Wustl? Why the hold up?
« on: March 06, 2008, 11:45:31 AM »
I received a scholarship offer in the last week in February and they extended the deadline to March 25th.

Just so you know.

43
Studying for the LSAT / Re: what do you think
« on: March 05, 2008, 02:09:03 AM »
I studied by myself with old tests and got a 174

44
$0

Two reasons:
1.  Having to explain to everyone for the rest of my life that I went to a law school named Washington that's in St Louis
2.  Ever been to St Louis?

hahaha, and yes I'm from just a little outside of St. Louis.  Not the best city in the world I'll admit.

I'm kind of surprised at the answers.  I figured many would say 0, but I figured a decent amount of people would say they would go to WUSTL.  It is a top 20 school, graduating from a top 20 law school with little debt seems like a very appealing idea.


45
Law School Applications / Re: Money Advice
« on: March 04, 2008, 09:00:21 AM »
I'm wondering the same with WUSTL with 30k and NYU.  Everyone on here tells me i'm stupid for considering WUSTL.

46
Just thought I'd get your opinions.  If you were offered 30k a year how much would NYU or CLS have to offer you (if any) in order to get you to attend if you did not care where you practiced.  (A big-law job would be preferable)

47
General Off-Topic Board / Re: The Tax System explained in Beer
« on: February 29, 2008, 01:03:58 PM »
and the bar enabled the poor to have anything at all....

48
General Off-Topic Board / The Tax System explained in Beer
« on: February 29, 2008, 12:53:36 PM »
Tax System explained in beer...

 Suppose that every day, ten men go out for beer and the bill for all ten comes to $100.  If they paid their bill the way we pay our taxes, it would go something like this

             The first four men (the poorest) would pay nothing.

             The fifth would pay $1.

             The sixth would pay $3.

             The seventh would pay $7.

             The eighth would pay $12.

             The ninth would pay $18.

             The tenth man (the richest) would pay $59.

             So, that's what they decided to do.

 The ten men drank in the bar every day and seemed quite happy with the arrangement, until one day, the owner threw them a curve. "Since you are all such good customers," he said, "I'm going to reduce the cost of your daily beer by $20."  Drinks for the ten now cost just $80.

 The group still wanted to pay their bill the way we pay our taxes so the first four men were unaffected. They would still drink for free.  But what about the other six men - the paying customers? How could they divide the $20 windfall so that everyone would get his 'fair share?'

 They realized that $20 divided by six is $3.33. But if they subtracted that from everybody's share, then the fifth man and the sixth man would each end up being paid to drink his beer. So, the bar owner suggested that it would be fair to reduce each man's bill by roughly the same amount, and he proceeded to work out the amounts each should pay.

  And so The fifth man, like the first four, now paid nothing (100% savings).

            The sixth now paid $2 instead of $3 (33%savings).

            The seventh now paid $5 instead of $7 (28%savings).

            The eighth now paid $9 instead of $12 (25% savings).

            The ninth now paid $14 instead of $18 ( 22% savings).

            The tenth now paid $49 instead of $59 (16% savings).

  Each of the six was better off than before. And the first four continued to

drink for free. But once outside the restaurant, the men began to compare

their savings.

  "I only got a dollar out of the $ 20,"declared the sixth man. He pointed to the tenth man," but he got $10!"

  "Yeah, that's right," exclaimed the fifth man. "I only saved a dollar, too. It's unfair that he got ten times more than I!"

  "That's true!!" shouted the seventh man. "Why should he get $10 back when

I got only two? The wealthy get all the breaks!"

   "Wait a minute," yelled the first four men in unison. "We didn't get anything

at all. The system exploits the poor!"

  The nine men surrounded the tenth and beat him up.

  The next night the tenth man didn't show up for drinks, so the nine sat down and had beers without him. But when it came time to pay the bill, they discovered something important. They didn't have enough money between all of them for even half of the bill!

  And that, boys and girls, journalists and college professors, this is how our tax system works. The people who pay the highest taxes get the most benefit from a tax reduction. Tax them too much, attack them for being wealthy, and they just may not show up anymore. In fact, they might start drinking overseas where the atmosphere is somewhat friendlier.

            David R. Kamerschen, Ph.D.

            Professor of Economics

            University of Georgia

  For those who understand, no explanation is needed. For those who do not understand, no explanation is possible.

49
ah, maybe I was hearing this from people who just didn't like Columbia or something.  So you wouldn't be worried about the number of faculty exits at all when choosing a school?

50
alright nothing to do with USNWR rankings but do any of you Columbia Law people care at all about the faculty that has been leaving in recent years?

If I understand correctly they have lost a good number of top professors in the past 3 or so years (along with I believe at least 3 more that are leaving this year for Cornell).  Is it normal for professors to move around like this?  This seems like it could be a huge issue that doesn't lead to a really quick move in the rankings.

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