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Messages - Freak

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51
Black Law Students / Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« on: July 08, 2008, 04:17:45 PM »
As I wrote previously, I know I handle my money better.

give me $20.

Precisely.

so...do you need an address or something?  :-\

Yep! I'll send the 10%APR contract for you to have notarized.  ;D

whoa. whoa. let's use biblical loan principles. in seven years...will you forgive the loan if I can't pay it back? I'll write up the contract. Jesus is my notary and his commission never expires!  :D

You know what, 7S, if you stay on the board for 7 years, it might just be worth $20.... ::) - might

52
Black Law Students / Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« on: July 08, 2008, 11:59:01 AM »
As I wrote previously, I know I handle my money better.

give me $20.

Precisely.

so...do you need an address or something?  :-\

Yep! I'll send the 10%APR contract for you to have notarized.  ;D

53
Black Law Students / Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« on: July 08, 2008, 11:11:59 AM »
As I wrote previously, I know I handle my money better.

give me $20.

Precisely.

54
Black Law Students / Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« on: July 08, 2008, 08:41:51 AM »
Meanwhile, the cheapest solution [Alci: which they're not doing] is for the government to take more control by changing the content of pennies so that they don't merely represent a huge subsidy to a failing private business.  I don't see how you can use this story as a parable about government inefficiency.  It looks like a parable about market inefficiency, lobbying, and corporate welfare to me.

I think you answered your own question, Miss P.

I'm not sure that many people could have anticipated the rapid rise in zinc prices, though.  This has just become a problem.  There's no evidence yet that congress and the treasury won't adapt.  Meanwhile, I doubt Freak was soapboxing about the problem with corporate lobbying and subsidies.

 ::) Miss P, this has been a problem since 2006.... How many corporations do you know that operate at a loss for 2 years straight? At least one, the US mint. It is corporate welfare which I detest. If our government is that susceptible to those interests, so much that it will literally lose money even in minting it, then why in the world would anybody wish to hand it more money in the form of mandatory taxes?

As I wrote previously, I know I handle my money better.

55
Studying for the LSAT / Re: reading comp advice...
« on: July 07, 2008, 04:26:15 PM »
When I took the LSAT in 2003, I read the first sentence of each paragraph, the first and last paragraphs and then the questions (not the answers). I then returned to the passage and read it fast in search of answers to the questions and when I found an answer, I marked it. I was able to only skim many sentences for key words.

I finished with over 10 minutes left to review my answers and missed one question. It worked for me, doesn't mean it'll work for anybody else.

56
Black Law Students / Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« on: July 07, 2008, 03:11:34 PM »
A Penny Saved?

A supplier of the much-maligned coin tries to keep making cents

By Allison Gorman

The Lincoln penny turns 100 next year, and with its negligible value, we're as likely to vacuum up a penny as to stoop for it. In two U.S. cities, however, cents are still major stakes. One is Greeneville, Tenn., where since 1998 Jarden Zinc Products has been the sole supplier of U.S. penny blanks, which are 98% zinc. The 200-employee company, a subsidiary of New York-based Jarden Corp., also makes coins for other countries, as well as solid zinc strip. But pennies are big busi-ness for Jarden. Dun & Bradstreet estimates the company's coinage revenues last year at $140 million, roughly three-quarters of its total sales. The U.S. Mint contract alone represents $275 million since fiscal year 2004—$106 million in FY07.

The other city is Washington, D.C., where mint director Edmund Moy recently warned Congress that the cost of making low-denomination coins is "unsustainable." With metals prices soaring, the Mint has produced pennies and nickels at a loss since 2006; last year the cost of a penny peaked at 1.67 cents. Moy believes proposed legislation allowing the Treasury Department, not Congress, to determine coins' metal content could save taxpayers $100 million a year. Bill sponsor Sen. Wayne Allard (R-Colo.) says de-politicizing coin production would free it from influence by those with "an interest in keeping the status quo." Jarden Zinc, for one, anteed up $180,000 to lobbyists in 2006 and refers media inquiries to Washington attorney Mark Weller, its lobbyist and spokesman for pro-penny group Americans for Common Cents.

Jarden helped found ACC in 1990 to fight a now-perennial ground swell to eliminate the penny altogether. That move would cost Americans $600 million a year in prices, "rounded up," Weller says. MIT scientist and anti-penny crusader Jeff Gore counters that dealing with cents wastes $10 billion of Americans' time annually. "We need money," he says. "But how fine a gradation do we need?" (When the half penny was retired, Gore says, it had the buying value of today's dime.) Weller acknowledges that the penny will eventually disappear, but insists that "we're not at that point right now." Congress seems to agree—this session, anyhow—but with Allard's legislation gaining traction, and the Treasury Department eyeing steel as a coin substrate, Jarden is positioning itself for change. The company does produce steel coinage, Weller notes—though he suggests zinc may prove the more stable choice long-term.
Time will tell whether the Mint takes that bet; for now, it's opted out of the Jarden contract, which ends Sept. 30.


Seriously, how does anybody justify letting the government handle our money when they can't even create money at a profit, especially when they have a monopoly on the whole printing money industry?

Politicians lose money even when they print it.

57
And if justice was my goal why the F would I be in law school?

really!  join the f-ing peace corps or something  :D

hiya freak, whereya been?

Hey rev. I'm one of those ambulance chasers   :P now and usually lack the time for the board. Although when I'm on here I generally just annoy people.

Currently, I have the secretaries so backed up that there's little point to giving them more dictation to transcribe.

How about you?

58
Change the hypo to a large magority of Drivers rear end driver B, and the law says becuase he's a B you don't have to pay for his damages. This is not as simple as tying it to torts.

Do you have any idea how many car crashes occur? And unfortunately, no insurance really means most people without insurance don't pay. Likewise, Jim Crow laws required reading exams and poll taxes, those did not overtly prohibit blacks from voting, but had the same effect. Ask a crash victim what they want more, a normal life physically or the right to vote. Answer - a normal life, probably right up there with freedom.

Quote
And if justice was my goal why the F would I be in law school?

 ;D

59

So its ok for whites to reap the benefits of laws enforcing racial discrimination for 250 years, then defacto discrimination for another 100 years until the late 1960s. A legacy the practically kept all blacks out of the law school, much less top law schools, and almost entirely out of the legal profession until the last 30. All that discrimination was OK, but reverse discrimination is not. Because now the discrimination is against whites so its bad? So, what your saying is it cool for whites to discriminate, but not for blacks. We have moved away from that, all discrimination, even if it helped us in the past is bad now, if it hurts us now.

So two wrongs make a right? You endorse that principal with that argument. Life is not fair, it never has been fair, and until the hearafter, life will never be fair. Justice means correcting wrongs by making individual wrongdoers pay. Does a thief's son have to repay the victims of his father's crimes? Of course, not that would be absurd. AA means a thief's grandson or even great-grandson or even a recent white immigrant whose ancestors never owned slaves or tolerated slavery, must pay.

Go read Fredrick Douglas - he knew what he was talking about.

Social justice and criminal justice are two very diffrent things not to mention the macro or micro levels of the issue.

Ok - social justice - torts. Driver A negligently rear-ends Driver B, but A lacks the money to pay because B now needs surgery and regardless will be in a wheelchair for life. So, clearly, A's son and grandson must pay. Clearly B's life is now shot and this adversely affects his children as he lacks the energy to raise them properly. They go on to become uneducated without job skills.

Furthermore, the laws do not require A to have insurance (see Wisconsin), so all the citizens of Wisconsin are now responsible, right? In fact, not only the living citizens, but also the future citizens have responsibility to B's children and children's children because the laws in place screwed up their lives by allowing A to drive without insurance. This despite the fact that new law, passed by the future citizens, require each driver to have a million dollars in insurance.

Two wrongs do not make a right - unless, justice is not your goal.

60
Black Law Students / Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« on: June 27, 2008, 10:25:24 AM »
 :o

So you think circumstantial evidence is enough for a death sentence? (if we grant that the system has been corrected enough to allow for death sentences) I concede that corrupt prosecutors have tainted the system to the point where I do not feel comfortable with current convictions.

What's impractical about a 2 year trial deadline? Why should it take an appellate court more than two months to review a serious death penalty case? They won't have many and they should take priority.

The televised re-executions is for deterrent purposes. One of those a month ought to make murders think first. Additionally, it should make them think about the damage a murder does to the living.

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