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Messages - BYUgrad06

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11
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Test Accommodations Good News/Questions
« on: June 11, 2007, 01:10:59 PM »
yeah ADHD is definitely not a diversity factor and if you are a BYU grad then you are most likely white and from a middle to upper middle class family which means you have absolutely no diversity

I'm from a low middle class family, thank you.

12
Studying for the LSAT / LR Bible Question
« on: June 11, 2007, 12:35:55 PM »
What should we do with the chapter on Formal Logic? Skip it?  The author says that only one to three formal logic problems appear on the LSAT, so should I skip it or grin and read it?  I''m just not sure if it is an important chapter or if it is meant as a side option for those who have mastered most or all of the other areas.

13
I asked them how they rate the scores of accommodated tests vs regular scores. And what did they say?  NO I wouldn't be at a disadvantage because they are compared equally with the other scores, meaning they would be regarded the same as any other.

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Studying for the LSAT / Re: Test Accommodations Good News/Questions
« on: June 06, 2007, 01:47:54 PM »
If you have a documented disability, aren't they supposed to provide accommodations?  It would seem that it could help add diversity to a law program, no?  I would hope not, as it wouldn't be fair. 

The people who have been waiving ADHD diagnoses around for special accommodations since they were 6 are called spoiled brats, and law schools have plenty of them, so no they don't add diversity.

Your argument that it's only fair for adcomms to consider your score as legitimate as any other as part a reasonable accommodation is  not valid. The LSAT exists to give Adcomms an idea of your abilities as a law student.  According to LSAC's own findings, accommodated scores do not predit law school performance the way regular scores do. It would fairest (and indeed not a violation of anyone's rights), therefore, for Adcomms to just ignore your score, or view it with as much skepticism as possible.

You are an idiot.  Spoiled brats?  You try dealing with it in every facet in you life, if affects your learning pace.  And no I should not be denied a legal edducation because of it.  It levels the playing field.  And my argument IS VALID.   Your just irritated because I would no longer be at a disadvantage due to a circumstanc beyond my control.

15
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Test Accommodations Good News/Questions
« on: June 05, 2007, 01:45:37 PM »

If you have a documented disability, aren't they supposed to provide accommodations? It would seem that it could help add diversity to a law program, no? I would hope not, as it wouldn't be fair. 

Being a !@%#ing retard doesn't add diversity to a law program. What kind of a dumbass are you??? What the hell have you been smoking?! And where can i get some? Take your adderall like a good little boy and forget about the extra time.

However, if, even with the adderall, you are well below the median lsat score for the schools you want to attend and the extra time gets you well above the median, then use the extra time given, kick ass on the lsat and write some crazy excuse in an addendum to justify the extra time. And I'm not talking 'Duhh, I got me this here problem with mah concentration cause I got me that ADHD kajigger.. uhh, what was i saying? Oh yeah, Puppies are delicious...' Write up a polished statement talking about how you kicked ass in school and work but the anxiety related to the test was unbearable due to your ^!@#$*-up condition.

God damn man. R U 4 REALZ?

Go sit on it.

16
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Test Accommodations Good News/Questions
« on: June 05, 2007, 01:27:23 PM »
I was at a mock admissions process with dean of admissions from Michigan Penn Virginia and Chicago, and someone asked whether disability accomodated LSAT will affect their admissions. They obviously said no, but it was pretty apparent that they were so exstatic about that (your application will have "disability accomdated" printed right on it). This puts you at a double bind. If you do well, then they might think that you got around the system. If you did bad, then they really won't like your application. Level playing field would mean, for example, non-native english speakers like me getting a dictionary next to the LSAT because I don't have a good command of english. If you can do fine with regular time, I would go for that.

Why should it be held against them?  If they had a documented disability that puts the applicant at a disadvantage under standard time, how should recieving extra time to level the playing field be held against them?  If I have a documented disability, how could an accommodated test not be considered an objective measure? that does not seems right.

17
Should or is an applicant be at a disadvantage in the admissions process due the fact they got extra time on the LSAT due to a disablitity/impairment?

18
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Test Accommodations Good News/Questions
« on: June 05, 2007, 12:49:18 PM »
no no no

on the actual test you will be either even with others or advantaged depending on how bad your disability is.

however, you might be disadvantaged (or you might not...i'm no pro) when it comes to the actual admissions process. Admissions officers will know that you received extra time on the test(LSAC puts an asterisk by your score when it is sent out and i think an explanation as well) and might say, well he got a good score with extra time, but will he be able to keep up with a disability of that kind in law school? if you're applying to T14 schools they might not think you'll be able to...anyway, thats just a thought and by no means fact.


If you have a documented disability, aren't they supposed to provide accommodations?  It would seem that it could help add diversity to a law program, no?  I would hope not, as it wouldn't be fair. 

19
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Best letter to guess?
« on: June 05, 2007, 12:32:10 PM »
B,C,D should be your better bet. 

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Studying for the LSAT / Re: Test Accommodations Good News/Questions
« on: June 05, 2007, 12:25:58 PM »
dang man, extra time would be nice...keep in mind that your score will have an asterisk by it so adcomms will know you were given extra time. Could be good, could be bad.

How could that be negative?  Wouldn't having an impairment/disability but me at a bigger disadvantage with just 35 minutes a section, or could the extra 17 minutes help level the playing field?  I appeal to the latter.

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