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Messages - Roman815

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21
Here is what i have heard about Cal Western as compared to USD. You have better job prospects at the bottom of your class at USD than finishing top of your class at Cal Western.

I sure hope you're right because I have no idea how I did on my finals.  ???

22
If you don't mind moving then go to the better school. If nothing else you will have an interesting story to tell recruiters as opposed to those going to school in the area.

23
I had looked at USD before and was pretty close to the bottom 25%'s for LSAT and GPA.  However, I retook the LSAT in December and with the classes I've taken this semester, I should raise my GPA (not by a lot, but enough to make me more competitive)

I'll have to give them another look and see if I stand a better chance now.  As far as my situation, yes I am going to law school straight after completing my undergrad in May.

I was in your shoes last year since my GPA was below the 25% and my LSAT was exactly at the 25%. Good thing I applied to USD anyways because I got in (I'm not a URM) with a $16,000 yearly scholarship and now I'm a 1L here. So write a great personal statement and don't give up hope!

24
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Anyone have problems w/ dell
« on: August 15, 2007, 05:55:35 PM »
The only problems I had with Dell were AFTER I got it. They did not include the right amount of memory, the printer had to be replaced twice, and the computer crashed and died forever after only 2 1/2 years. It was a very expensive paperweight.

I am a mac girl now.  :)

I'm sure you've heard of something called a warranty. It seems you didn't buy one and therefore your computer was not covered. How can you blame Dell for this? An Apple wouldn't be covered either after 2.5 years unless you had purchased an extended warranty for it. I've had both Apple and Dell computers and like Apple better but to blame Dell for selling you a computer that lasted 2.5 years is silly. Electronics fail all of the time so make sure to buy a warranty if you want to guarantee a piece of equipment. I know that my Dell will last at least 4 years because I purchased a 4 year warranty. I hope that makes sense.

25
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Kaplan LSAT course- your thoughts
« on: August 14, 2007, 01:32:19 PM »
Instructors matter more than the brand name.  That being said, Kaplan has one of the worst reputations in the industry.  I'm tutoring two Kaplan refugees now, and neither knew the difference between a necessary assumption and a sufficient assumption.

LSAT 180 is not a great book.  There's no structured method to take away for use on other games and much of their content doesn't match the things that LSAC does on the real test.

Anyhoo, I do recommend taking a class, but do your homework on the instructors before you drop all that money.

That's pretty funny. My Kaplan teacher thought us that from the beginning. I went from a 144 on the practice to a 161 on the real LSAT but maybe that's because I took Kaplan Extreme. Just get a good teacher and it won't matter where you went.

26
When I first read the thread title my brain processed:  "Opportunities for sex during orientation?"

That makes two of us. I bet the OP changed the title after we read it, lol.

27
Where should I go next fall? / Re: 3rd tier school w/ low GPA???
« on: August 05, 2007, 09:13:52 PM »
Well...I took the SAT's in 1994....so I doubt they would have any bearing on my applications. I am 2+ years out of undergrad, and I went part time for 6 years.
I do have to consider a school where a "non-traditional" student would be more the norm.
As for my perception of social justice I tend to think of it as a right to civil equality for all members of society- especially the disabled,women,children as well as  minorities of religious, ethnic and racial backgrounds. As a psychology major I am drawn towards "helping people"- but I simply don't having any interest in the therapuetic aspect of that. :-*


I asked about your SAT b/c it can help predict your LSAT to some extent, at least as a minimum.  If you take 1/2 your SAT, drop the zero at the end, and add a one a front, you theoretically get your likely LSAT score plus/minus three points.  (So 1400 = 170 or 167-173.)  This is a very rough shorthand with frequent exceptions, but you should probably be able to do at least as well as your predicted range if you study hard enough.  (You may also of course be able to exceed it considerably.)

Social justice as equality before the law makes sense to me.

I scored an 1130 on my SAT but got a 161 on the LSAT. This isn't exactly an accurate system.

The 1994 SAT isn't even scored like the later tests that went to 1600, so it doesn't really provide an accurate baseline. Second, people tend not to prep as much for the SAT (if at all), so that doesn't show what a person who preps for several months or takes a course might be able to do.


See below. There was a slight shift in percentiles at this time, but it wasn't that extreme.  An 1130 at that time, for example, would probably be more like an 1150 or 1160 today. 

Just wondering but what was your SAT score and what is your LSAT score?

28
Where should I go next fall? / Re: 3rd tier school w/ low GPA???
« on: August 05, 2007, 01:55:13 PM »
Well...I took the SAT's in 1994....so I doubt they would have any bearing on my applications. I am 2+ years out of undergrad, and I went part time for 6 years.
I do have to consider a school where a "non-traditional" student would be more the norm.
As for my perception of social justice I tend to think of it as a right to civil equality for all members of society- especially the disabled,women,children as well as  minorities of religious, ethnic and racial backgrounds. As a psychology major I am drawn towards "helping people"- but I simply don't having any interest in the therapuetic aspect of that. :-*


I asked about your SAT b/c it can help predict your LSAT to some extent, at least as a minimum.  If you take 1/2 your SAT, drop the zero at the end, and add a one a front, you theoretically get your likely LSAT score plus/minus three points.  (So 1400 = 170 or 167-173.)  This is a very rough shorthand with frequent exceptions, but you should probably be able to do at least as well as your predicted range if you study hard enough.  (You may also of course be able to exceed it considerably.)

Social justice as equality before the law makes sense to me.

The SAT to LSAT conversion only sort of works.  Both are scored on the same same 0-60 scale.  Thus a 700 would put you in the same % of test takers as a 1400 on the SAT.  Since they are scaled the same and test some of the same skills they are certainly some correlations.  On the other hand they do not test the exact same skills (probably you verbal score SAT is the better indicator, generally the people who take the LSAT are slightly better students than the SAT takers, people study more for the LSAT, and reported SAT scores don't match actually single SAT results because students are allowed to take their highest section scores from different SATs and combine them, thus three scores of 1330 (690-640 verbal-math scores), 1400 (760-640), and 1390 (700-690) would give you a 1460 when the highest individual test score is actually 1400.  So don't assume a 1400+ on SAT necessarily means you will probably get 170+ on the LSAT.  Obviously you cannot mix and match LSAT score sections.

In that case, I had an 1150. I took the SAT twice and got 1130 both times but the sections that I did better on switched up and therefore my score after the combination would have gone up. It would be nice if the LSAT was like that.

29
Where should I go next fall? / Re: 3rd tier school w/ low GPA???
« on: August 05, 2007, 02:42:41 AM »
Well...I took the SAT's in 1994....so I doubt they would have any bearing on my applications. I am 2+ years out of undergrad, and I went part time for 6 years.
I do have to consider a school where a "non-traditional" student would be more the norm.
As for my perception of social justice I tend to think of it as a right to civil equality for all members of society- especially the disabled,women,children as well as  minorities of religious, ethnic and racial backgrounds. As a psychology major I am drawn towards "helping people"- but I simply don't having any interest in the therapuetic aspect of that. :-*


I asked about your SAT b/c it can help predict your LSAT to some extent, at least as a minimum.  If you take 1/2 your SAT, drop the zero at the end, and add a one a front, you theoretically get your likely LSAT score plus/minus three points.  (So 1400 = 170 or 167-173.)  This is a very rough shorthand with frequent exceptions, but you should probably be able to do at least as well as your predicted range if you study hard enough.  (You may also of course be able to exceed it considerably.)

Social justice as equality before the law makes sense to me.

I scored an 1130 on my SAT but got a 161 on the LSAT. This isn't exactly an accurate system.

30
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: Dog Fighting vs. Police Work
« on: July 30, 2007, 05:05:40 AM »
Im not sure if this subject has been brought up already but has anyone considered the differences between dogs trained for fighting and dogs trained for police work? In my opinion, it's basically the same thing. Both situations force dogs to train. The owners in both situations train the dogs to either kill or be killed. ( Kill either a criminal or another dog. Killing the criminal is actually worse, in my opinion). The owners in both situations place the animal in potentially harmful situations. Ex: somebody calls in a bomb threat.--Police: send the dog in, I'm not about to die.--can anyone explain to me how it's any different? Does the law state that only officials trained to mistreat animals can do so?  Dog fighting is not uncommon; it happened all the time around my neighborhood. Bottom line, blacks do it, its dog fighting. Whites do it, its police work. Leave Mike Vick alone

You clearly gave little thought to either situation and have instead decided to create a theory based on racial stereotypes. I don't know how you did on the LSAT but your reasoning is faulty. First, you make the false assumption that everyone who participates in dog fighting is black and that every police officer is white. Secondly, you falsely assume that police work is the same as dog fighting since, in your mind, training a dog is training a dog, no matter what it's trained for. Using this logic, a dog that visits patients at a hospital or helps disabled people is the same as one that fights. Thirdly, you've done no research and don't realize that the police don't train dogs to "kill or be killed". They use dogs to either sniff for items or to intimidate criminals. Dogs are not used to attack people. If they were used for such a purpose, you'd see many lawsuits.

When was the last time you've heard or seen a dog kill a criminal? Never. I'm certain that the only time you've seen a police dog attack someone was when reading about the civil rights movement. Fourthly, the police use robots and bomb squads to defuse bombs, not dogs.  You also forgot to mention that the police use dogs to protect and to serve the public. They keep their dogs in good condition and don't use them to fight. People who participate in dog fights do so for pleasure and make sure to mistreat their dogs. You are clearly a bigot and a flamer who doesn't belong in law school.

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