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Messages - lp4law

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1
Bar Exam / Re: CA Bar Prep Recommendations?
« on: May 26, 2007, 02:29:51 AM »
Rez -

I took the Feb 2007 CA bar exam.  I just found out I passed today.  For bar prep, I went with LECC (professor Schmitt from Southwestern Law School).  I'm very pleased with the results, especially since I was working full-time during the bar prep period.  Schmitt has an abrasive personality (he's actually just a ham), but his outlines are outstanding, and he teaches a very practical approach to writing the exam.

Good luck on the bar.


Hey aero2law...

It's been a long time since I've been on this site.  I believe we emailed before.
Anyway, I am leaning towards BarPassers too.  They have an iPod option that allows you to view the lectures anytime and anywhere.  I don't know about you but I am tired of going to classes.  BarPassers' flow charts are great.

Anyway, just my $0.02.

2
Bar Exam / CA Bar Prep Recommendations?
« on: October 01, 2006, 05:31:20 AM »
OK...I'm getting ready to plunk down the money for a bar prep course.

I'm an evening student who works full time during the day.  I'm finishing my last semester right now.  Taking the Feb 2007 CA bar exam.  For bar prep, I'm looking primarily at options that are well established, and have CDs available for home-study of at least the substantive material (I work/live about 1 hour north of LA, and want the CDs to use on my long drives to school).  So far I've narrowed it down to the following:

1.  Barbri (w/CDs)
2.  Barpassers (w/CDs)
3.  Professor Schmidt (LECC) -- local program with pretty good rep.  He'll let me use the CDs or the live lecture, not both.

I'm leaning toward Barpassers right now, because the materials seem comparable to Barbri, with flowcharts added in to boot.  Anybody have experience with these, or informed opinions about them?

Thanks.

3
General Board / Re: Tell me great gunner stories
« on: September 14, 2006, 04:36:23 AM »
Right when I started law school, we had the classic over-zealous young buck in the front row who would constantly ask questions that were off point, or well beyond the scope of the professor's lecture.  It actually got to the point where the prof would ask the class a question, he would raise his hand, then ask a completely unrelated question back to the prof without answering the question the prof asked. 

After a few weeks of that crap, I decided I'd calculate how much money this guy was costing the class per minute of wasted time.  At about $1/minute/student (tuition + books), with 90 students in class, it came out to about $90/minute.  But I didn't stop there.  I went ahead and built a spreadsheet macro on my computer that would trigger with the press of a button, and it would start counting $$$$ throughout his rants and the obligatory responses by the professor.  Each of his useless interruptions ended up costing the class an average of $120 of wasted class time.  In my book, any time you ask a question in class, it should be clear, concise, and worth the money it's about to cost everyone.  You have to ask yourself, "is this a $120 question?"  Otherwise save it for office hours.

It's like some people are raised not to understand that everything you do impacts those around you in some way.  Dudes like that are just one of many reasons the draft should be reinstated -- no sense of teamwork, discipline, judgment or situational awareness.




The above comments seem to be the type only a gunner would make...hmmm....

Pure conclusion with no analysis.  Congratulations...you've just wasted more of the class's valuable time just to hear the sound of your own keystrokes. 

Gunner.   ;) ;D 

4
General Board / Re: Tell me great gunner stories
« on: September 13, 2006, 03:15:27 AM »
Right when I started law school, we had the classic over-zealous young buck in the front row who would constantly ask questions that were off point, or well beyond the scope of the professor's lecture.  It actually got to the point where the prof would ask the class a question, he would raise his hand, then ask a completely unrelated question back to the prof without answering the question the prof asked. 

After a few weeks of that crap, I decided I'd calculate how much money this guy was costing the class per minute of wasted time.  At about $1/minute/student (tuition + books), with 90 students in class, it came out to about $90/minute.  But I didn't stop there.  I went ahead and built a spreadsheet macro on my computer that would trigger with the press of a button, and it would start counting $$$$ throughout his rants and the obligatory responses by the professor.  Each of his useless interruptions ended up costing the class an average of $120 of wasted class time.  In my book, any time you ask a question in class, it should be clear, concise, and worth the money it's about to cost everyone.  You have to ask yourself, "is this a $120 question?"  Otherwise save it for office hours.

It's like some people are raised not to understand that everything you do impacts those around you in some way.  Dudes like that are just one of many reasons the draft should be reinstated -- no sense of teamwork, discipline, judgment or situational awareness.



5
General Board / Re: To law students 29+
« on: August 16, 2006, 10:30:53 PM »
I'm a former Marine myself.  Trust me -- when you're in class and people start whining about how hard it is getting called on, or how mean their professor is, you're going to laugh your *ss off.  Most of these people haven't been tested under the kind of simultaneous mental, emotional and physical stress that you have.  In fact, almost all of the day and a good percentage of the part-time programs are filled with people who are too young to have even held down a full-time job.  I'm sure you'll do well.
 
I often wonder if I am being over confident Im 33 I've been working for ten years now and have a very high stress/pressure job. I was also a Marine for five years, I'm just not thinking that all the horror stories i hear about law school and how much work it is will bother me. Im no stranger to hard work, I've been dealing with dealines and such for a long time now ...and i just dont think academic work is that difficult if you put in the time and effort...am i crazy?

6
I don't disagree with the OP's advice to women.  But for the dudes on this board, there is a second pearl hidden in her little oyster of wisdom:

I am currently good friends with a guy who attends harvard law.  He is being harassed by fabulous job opportunities, and, as my friend, will gladly help me in the future.  He could care less that I go to a T3 school.  No, I'm not sleeping with him, either.  But he appreciates our friendship and says that many people at his school, while brilliant, are very one-dimensional.

So what's the lesson here?  If she's as attractive as she says she is, this Harvard guy wants to bang her.  That means that the only reason she isn't "sleeping with him" is that she knows this dork will give her the keys to his world (that he presumably worked so hard to get into) without her having to fully satisfy her end of the deal.  The guy she's really sleeping with wouldn't put up with this bullsh*t.  Beautiful women generally sleep with A-holes who understand the concept of an equitable exchange of goods and services, not dorky nice guys who give them the world for nothing.

7
General Board / Re: To law students 29+
« on: August 08, 2006, 03:39:47 AM »
This isn't to toot my own horn - but to demonstrate what's possible if you keep all the "plates" balanced and spinning:

I'm 36, and about to finish up law school as an evening student.  During my entire time in law school, I've worked a full-time day job as an engineer for a large aerospace company, been a founding partner in a growing start-up technology company on the side, and commuted 3 hours to get to school and back 4 evenings/week.  Still I'm in the top 30% of my class and graduating a semester early from one of those schools with a so-called "killer curve." 

I believe there are three primary reasons I've been able to manage all of this comfortably:  1) I have enough real-world experience to actually be interested in the details of the subject matter taught in my classes (whereas most younger students consider law school to be academic torture, or just a place to "pay their dues"); 2)  I can write my *ss off (again, real-world business/work experience paying off); and 3) I maintain tight control of my personal life: Thus far I've managed to avoid marriage, kids, spousal support and child support.  Avoiding the pitfalls of marriage/kids (and their likely after-effects) has left me the ability to pay for a new home, my dream car, and school without relying on mommy or daddy's money. 

My home is my sanctuary....a fortress of solitude, if you will.  It is completely devoid of all nagging, bitching, whining, complaining, and any other unnecessary noises, stresses, manipulations, or distractions.  Because I have absolute dominion and control over my home, I can create, at will, an environment of absolute peace and tranquility, like something out of a Disney movie...with soft music, the smell of fresh plants, birds chirping and sh*t like that.  I can completely concentrate in that environment, which substantially reduces the amount of studying I require. 

I stay fit.  When I want to hang out with friends and family, I make time for them.  When I want to get laid, I know who to call.  I'm happier than I've ever been, and becoming even happier with each passing day.  My stock is constantly on the rise, and I don't have to answer to anyone about what I do with my time, my money, or my d*ck.  Life is good my friend.

Anyways...I probably went well beyond what you were looking for in a response, but I figured I'd just put it all out on the table for you.  The bottom line is you just have to find your own balance.  If I can do it, you can do it.

Best of luck to you...and remember, above all else have fun.

8
Southwestern / Re: Who's Attending Southwestern?
« on: May 16, 2006, 09:29:53 PM »
Hey Sarah.

I just finished up my 3rd year (evening).  I'll actually be done by December (3.5 years total).  I still look forward to each new semester.  Let me know if you have any questions when you start.  I certainly have opinions about certain professors, etc.

Good luck and remember to have fun.

P.S. -- I don't check this site all that frequently. So if you have questions for me, send me a message and I'll get an email notifying me to check.

I, too, am about to enter the Evening Program...

So it's been about a year, how are you all feeling now?

9
General Board / Re: patent bar study aides
« on: February 08, 2006, 01:45:03 PM »
Question:

I'm an evening 3L about to graduate in December '06. I was planning on taking the Patent Bar at the end of this Summer.  However, I just found out through my school that there will be IP firm interviews at Loyola Chicago in August, and I need to have my resume handed in by mid April.  Even though I have a bunch of work experience as an engineer and CAD designer, I really want the Patent Bar on that resume for a competative advantage.  That gives me about 3 weeks to take the test, so the results will come in on time to be included in my resume.  I have already completed courses in both Patent law and Trademark law, and am taking a current course in patent application drafting.

My question is, what's a good study aid course that has CDs that I can listen to in my car (I have a lot of daily commute time that I want to use)?  My attention has been drawn toward Patbar.com so far.  Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

10
General Board / Re: Serious Responses Only Please
« on: January 27, 2006, 01:43:23 PM »
If you're the auburnchick from the other board, I'd say you need to move out to an LA law school, and I'll cover room and board.

In all seriousness, do you have any work/personal background that draws you to the law school experience?  This is something I wonder about a lot with my peers, who seem to struggle because they view law school as academic torture rather than a source of valuable information.  They're focused on the ends rather than the means.  This is how I was in undergrad, so I can relate.  But because I spent several years involved in engineering and entrepreneurial ventures following undergrad, every night I come to law school with a real thirst for information.  The personal risks I'm exposed to in my line of work are substantial, and I'm in law school primarily to help me navigate shark-infested waters that I'm already swimming in.  That can really motivate you.  As a result, I actually enjoy law school.  I think your success in law school hinges more on your perspective rather than pure intellect.

Do you at least have some mentors or role models in the field of law?  Do you have personal experiences or memories of times when legal knowledge would have been valuable to you?  That might help you establish a perspective that allows you to enjoy your law school experience more.

Best of luck to you.

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