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Messages - ladi

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41
I'm a prospective law student who identifes as being an African-American. Well, this is my first post and I was just basically wondering which law schools make black students feel the most welcome? I'd like for as many people to respond to this post so I could gather a sense of what schools that I could apply to. I am aware of the BLSA being prominent at many law schools, but I wanted to know more information. Thanks! :)


Well, I am about to start my first year at Richmond. The impression that I get is that the school is very welcoming of black students.  The associate dean of admissions is very caring and seems to really want minorities on a whole to be successful.

Of course, I will most likely have much more to say when I begin but I would encourage you to visit the schools that you are interested in to really get a feel for the place.

What schools are you interested in?  Any preferred region?

42

My comment refers to recent Caribbean (& African) immigrants/descendants and our accomplishments in this country.  I am grateful for my experience, very proud of what people of my background are doing as a small minority here.  Grateful to be a part of that group because of the struggles of my immigrant family (and others). Instead of being so suspicious and making assumptions, why not first inspect your own touchiness? It does not bother me one bit when African-Americans celebrate their accomplishments so why do you take issue with other people who do the same? While this could be incorrect, something in your post seems to reek of an inferiority complex. If you do not feel you are “special”, please do realize that is your issue and no one else.

Further, since when are you the only one who has the right to point out who you are? Is it because for so long, certain people have robbed/insulted your identity, that now you are suspicious of and/or even dislike to see “others” be comfortable with theirs? Think more deeply about your comments. You call yourself African-American, but then the rest of us ought not or at least be careful to distinguish ourselves as West Indian, African etc.? Frankly, that sounds like the mentality of those who attempted to force our ancestors to forget their tribes, languages, traditions etc. It is not about benefit, it is who about we are. Because in case you have forgotten, everyone has an experience, a history, culture, legacy, heritage etc. Our accomplishments would be shorter if not for African-Americans? Let me assure you that our accomplishments are long regardless, and no one has gotten anywhere without help from someone else, African-Americans included. (And just to add, while I certainly recognize the benefits we enjoy due to African-American efforts, the liberation of African peoples did not start with the Civil Rights Movement and the spark did not necessarily occur on American shores…but yes, that’s another convo, which I have no problem entering in.)

So no, I will not be "losing" the "get over it" statement. In regards to my initial comment, everyone has their own experience...that reflects mine.


You can do one of two things:

a) You can continue to engage me by defending your poorly thought-out counterargument and end up exposing/embarrassing yourself.
b) You can realize that your post goes a long way toward validating most of my claims, cut your losses and shut your trap.

Pick one.


In other words, you have no response. Do yourself a favor and take your own advice.

 :D

43
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Early Summer Start
« on: April 26, 2007, 11:21:17 AM »
I am doing the early entry program. There is also the option to graduate a semester early, if you enroll one additional summer. The associate dean told us that the only time it is not recommended is if a person is coming straight out of undergrad because people usually need a break.

44
I am...my only concern is for those still under the thumb...

Edit: I'm going to stop being so cryptic...

I'm a little...no...a lot...touchy about this subject given my IRL interaction with members of this so-called model minority.  Like you, Ladi, they all seem oh so thrilled to bear the label of "model minority"...I personally think that's insulting but whatev...my major beef is that hand in hand with the eagerness to conform and be accepted into the fold goes a baseless sense of superiority towards African-Americans.
I've heard immigrant blacks make too many disparaging comments about AA blacks (for e.g. even though it isn't inflammatory, think about the implications of this sentence from the article: As one immigrant Jamaican friend once told me, "I'm too busy working two jobs to worry about the white man's racism.) and I'm tired of gently and not-so-gently reminding folks that that list of accomplishments that they so lovingly recite to anyone who'll listen would be a whole lot shorter if not for the efforts of African Americans. (this usually results in those folks trying to use the civil rights movement to underscore just how whiny and lazy their AA counterparts are...but that's another convo)

So fine, people may not want to acknowledge this, or may choose to direct those grateful feelings elsewhere but at the very least they should be pragmatic if they plan to make a life here...because while folks can think they're special and different all they want and that their two jobs can protect from them institutional racism...the stats show a regression to the mean by the third-generation...so that means their grand-kids will be neither special nor different.  Maybe, just maybe, people should direct a little of the energy they pour into detailing the difference between themselves and AAs into something more useful...like I dunno, focusing on improving the system so it won't have a chance to fail their children...throwing their political capital behind educational reform so that regression won't have to equal reversal...I mean, if their descendants are going to be African-Americans, maybe it isn't such a hot idea to help perpetuate stereotypes that will harm them...

When I see articles (like this one and the one on home ownership in NYC etc.) that chronicle strides being made by the black people but are careful to point out that they are "other" (West Indian/African) I'm a little suspicious...because I wonder for whose benefit is this distinction being made?  I'm not saying that people shouldn't be proud of their heritage...what I am saying is that they should think more deeply about what they might be trading away in their quest for positive reinforcement.  You may not match up to my perceptions of you Ladi, and if that's so...here's a tip...lose the "get over it"...         

My comment refers to recent Caribbean (& African) immigrants/descendants and our accomplishments in this country.  I am grateful for my experience, very proud of what people of my background are doing as a small minority here.  Grateful to be a part of that group because of the struggles of my immigrant family (and others). Instead of being so suspicious and making assumptions, why not first inspect your own touchiness? It does not bother me one bit when African-Americans celebrate their accomplishments so why do you take issue with other people who do the same? While this could be incorrect, something in your post seems to reek of an inferiority complex. If you do not feel you are “special”, please do realize that is your issue and no one else.

Further, since when are you the only one who has the right to point out who you are? Is it because for so long, certain people have robbed/insulted your identity, that now you are suspicious of and/or even dislike to see “others” be comfortable with theirs? Think more deeply about your comments. You call yourself African-American, but then the rest of us ought not or at least be careful to distinguish ourselves as West Indian, African etc.? Frankly, that sounds like the mentality of those who attempted to force our ancestors to forget their tribes, languages, traditions etc. It is not about benefit, it is who about we are. Because in case you have forgotten, everyone has an experience, a history, culture, legacy, heritage etc. Our accomplishments would be shorter if not for African-Americans? Let me assure you that our accomplishments are long regardless, and no one has gotten anywhere without help from someone else, African-Americans included. (And just to add, while I certainly recognize the benefits we enjoy due to African-American efforts, the liberation of African peoples did not start with the Civil Rights Movement and the spark did not necessarily occur on American shores…but yes, that’s another convo, which I have no problem entering in.)

So no, I will not be "losing" the "get over it" statement. In regards to my initial comment, everyone has their own experience...that reflects mine.

45
I saw this show yesterday and after listening to the stories, I started to cry.  These young girls that are struggling and have all these challenges - have hope.  They are disciplined, hardworking and focused!  I could feel their strength, their character.  Really, we have nothing to complain about.

It was very inspirational.

Thanks



I absolutely agree. I loved the special and found very inspirational.  The leadership academy website has the special on sale.  I am definitely going to get it as it is something worth showing to my future children and others...  :)

46
Affirmative Action / Re: Black LSAT statistics
« on: March 31, 2007, 02:01:58 PM »
Reading some of this I thought I should add that not all blacks born in the United States are African-American. I know many black people who have parents who were both born in Trinidad, or Gayana, while they were born here in the U.S. By saying that only African-Americans should be able to check the box, that closes the door for a lot of other American blacks. Personally I've never noticed the box with the option of only African-American, for me it's always said Black/African American which brought up my question in the first place.

It's difficult to really get on anyone's case about being foreign born and raised, then checking the African-American box when, as shown in the confusion displayed in this topic, there is such a lack-of-clarification, ignorance, and indifference surrounding the requirements for any given box.

That being said, I find it interesting that some surveys go the extra step and tell you if you aren't sure, or are of mixed heritage, to check the box of whichever option you appear closest too.

Interesting discussion. I believe the statistics included all ethnic African descendants, for lack of better words. There are boxes that only say African-American which for me is problematic. Neither do I care for the black/african-american box as to me it is equating the two as one in the same.  I am American of Caribbean descent and also of mixed heritage. I will generally mark "other" and specify, mark or "black" if listed  without African-American. Nothing else. That is what I did for law school and am in at my school of choice.

Hispanic and even some Asian options are listed out by ethnicity.  The same is not done for non-Hispanic people of African descent.

But this is the United States and this country is not necessarily known for ethnic consciousness...

47
I am grateful to be a part of the invisible 'model minority' and hope that our statistics improve.  It's true that Asians are NOT the only model minority.  I did not vote because I am unsure as to the effect this could have, if any.  But there are some interesting points made in this article...



There must have been some sort of "model minority" award dinner. (invisible of course to keep with the theme)  That's the only way to explain why you're grateful...because the whole model minority bit is wack. 

"We, the majority, have decided that this is the way you, the minorities, should act if you wish to be embraced as our equals.  Never mind that we don't even hold ourselves to these standards and that when our folks get out of pocket we just put it down to a tough break...it's just the way it works...you've heard of the Golden Rule haven't you? So play nice...

Ish is infantilizing as hell...



Get over it.

48
I am grateful to be a part of the invisible 'model minority' and hope that our statistics improve.  It's true that Asians are NOT the only model minority.  I did not vote because I am unsure as to the effect this could have, if any.  But there are some interesting points made in this article...

49
Law School Applications / Re: DECISION DATES FOR 2006/2007 CYCLE
« on: January 20, 2007, 09:43:42 AM »
Never mind. Frustration gone.  I'm in at Richmond!   ;D

50
Acceptances / Re: First acceptance: Richmond!
« on: January 19, 2007, 09:26:36 PM »
Congratulations!!!

If you go, I may be your fellow classmate!

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