Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - smujd2007

Pages: 1 ... 248 249 250 251 252 [253]
2521
I scored the same as you and you can tell by my screen name where I'm going to school.  Just look at the numbers that you have, look at the schools, and see if they fit.  In my case, they did. My GPA was significantly higher than yours( almost 4.0), but law school is a big numbers game.  My best advice to you is to apply early.  And, if you are still in undergrad, I would not retake the LSAT.  It has been my experience that the October LSAT falls right in the middle of midterms - which does not lessen the stress of the test.  Anyways, good luck.

2522
Law School Applications / Re: Multiple Addenda?
« on: July 10, 2004, 05:04:10 PM »
I would just write one statement integrating all of the issues.  You'll save time, and save the admissions people a big headache trying to keep up with all of that paper. But have a theme linking all the issues - though these may seem like problems, they have actually strengthened my commitment to law - or something or other.  Maybe something not so cheesy - I hope you get the idea.

2523
Studying for the LSAT / Re: LSAT Score--Need Advice
« on: July 10, 2004, 04:15:22 PM »
To Simone05,
I was in your shoes a year ago.  I was a minority, I did LSAT self study for two years, and bam!  I take the darn test and got a 147.  Though my GPA was significantly higher than yours,  I thought that my dream school was out of reach, and it is nowhere near NYU in the rankings.   You mentioned that you were a minority - I am too. Take advantage of that. Call NYU admissions people, and people of the other schools that you want to attend, and ask them what your chances are, given your grades, LSAT score and minority status. Use the personal statements to tell the admissions people who you really are. Work really hard on the personal statements because they will make or break your application. Others may know more about NYUs admissions or whatever, but if its meant for you to be there, you'll get in.  As for the test, from personal experience, I wouldn't retake it.  And to the poster that says that NYU is out of reach with your numbers, I heard the same advice. "You'll never get into SMU Law with that LSAT score." But I did.  And, like I said, I wouldn't put myself through the test again;  chances are, it might be a waste of time.  I knew several people who retook the LSAT in October after taking it in June, and they did about the same (two people did worse). So, just take this as a minor setback and good luck!!

2524
As for the member of this board who got a 178 with self study, good for him.  He is probably rare.  Everyone that I know who did self study didn't do well, and most people that I know that did the review courses still didn't do much better than those who didn't. I used plenty of LSAT prep materials, including almost ten years of back exams, and I still scored a 147. Standardized tests don't predict much; the people at my high school who did well on the SAT (I was not one of them) went on to college to flop. I didn't do well and I graduated, as a transfer student, with the highest GPA in the political science department of a private university. My 1120 SAT DID NOT predict this, and I suspect that my 147 on the LSAT will not sentence me to the gloom and doom of the bottom of my law school class. My point is, standardized tests are not very useful - they're just a way for schools to find an easy way to reject applicants.  But that's my personal opinion.

2525
I didn't like the LSAT because it gives an unfair advantage to people who can afford to take review classes and do well during one exam.  I work my butt off in school, and I graduated with a good GPA at a decent private school and I am off to a first tier law school, first generation.  I think the lsat shouldn't count as much as it does because:
1)everyone doesn't have the money to pay for those courses (and that's if the course actually guarantees success),
AND
2)like so many other things in life, success is measured by consistent performance, such as four years (or less) in undergrad all the time. The GPA is a more dependable measure . . obviously, if it weren't schools wouldn't still be using it!!

2526
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Full scholarships
« on: May 28, 2004, 11:05:32 PM »
SMU Dedman, 3.94, 147 (I was a special case).
The school gave me half, I got another half through another scholarship connected to the school which equals a full scholarship.

Pages: 1 ... 248 249 250 251 252 [253]