Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - ....,,.,

Pages: 1 ... 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 ... 37
101

OP should still wait to see what fee waivers he gets, and he'll get a lot.

Yes.

102
i always meant to as you MP, were you born in Montana?  You are the first person I know from there.

Nope, I was born in Washington at an Army Base - which leads me to a question I was thinking about as I was drying my hair (random I know): when you're asked for your hometown, what do you put? The town/city you live in currently, or the place you were born, or just the place you identify most with out of all the ones you've lived in?  Because I have 7 places I could possibly list, but I'm never sure which one.


ah i c.  how long have you lived there/where have you lived before?

i don't have your prob...i've lived in the same place since i was 2 months old

Well that's part of the problem - I was born in Tacoma, WA but only lived there for 6 months. Then my dad got transferred (Air Force) to Korea and we lived there 4 1/2 years. Then Arizona for 2 years, Florida for 2 years, Hawaii for 4 years (4th-7th grade), Texas for a year, then my dad retired and we moved to Montana. 7 years so far. But I'm reluctant to claim MT as my hometown (and my parents are moving in a couple years anyway, probably back to Washington)

First semester freshman year I wrote an education paper on having more unified, national standards, curriculua, etc. for education.  One of my points was that students who move around a lot get screwed because different districts/states can have very different curricula.  From your experience, is there any validity to that?

I know that this question wasn't directed at me, but I was an Army brat as well, and I definitely feel that my education was hampered by my many moves.  It seems that each new district had comparatively worse standards and curricula.  Your claim has a lot of validity.

That was more the length of response I was expecting, but thanks for your in-depth response MP.  ;)

girlanon - how did it work when students in different states study different subjects each year.  For example, if you were going into 8th grade, and in your old district they did World History in 7th, and US History in 8th, but in the new district they do US in 7th, World in 8th, what happened?  Would you just take US with 7th graders?

103

As far as scholarship money goes, I'm pretty sure that the t14 schools could care less how much money he is getting at W&M (not to pick on them, just one i remembered from his list). Therefore, the money game really helps only with other peer schools at the top.


I'm not just talking about the T14.  His money at W&M could help at a school like BU or wherever.


I think saying: "The people who say 6-8 are wrong, just wrong, completely wrong." is a little over the top.

Haha, I agree.  I do think 6-8 is probably too few, but my passionate rhetoric wasn't meant to be taken seriously.


Each application is around $80 after LSDAS fees. $80 might not be a lot of money for you, but it is for some people. I just don't see the point in applying to more than one or two safeties. In general, I don't think applying to 14 is too many (obviously, look at my LSN), but for this situation it probably isn't needed. I was suggesting that Tetris take some time and REALLY think about going to some of the schools he is intending on applying and considering if he were to actually go there if accepted.


Just for the record $80 was a lot of money for me.  I paid my own way through college.  I spent about $2500 on the whole law school application process (app fees, visits, etc.) and as a college student with only a part time job, it took me a while to pay off the credit card debt...just didn't want it to seem like I'm some rich kid pretending money isn't a big deal.  But anyway, that was certainly the best $2500 I ever spent.  First of all, I probably got my money's worth just in free alcohol at ASWs.  Second, visiting lots of schools was helpful.  Third, I believe that Tetris, like me last year, is going into his senior year at college.  For other people who took some time off, they probably have an easier time narrowing schools down.  For a lot of people like me coming straight from UG, we really have no limitations in terms of geography, wife and kids, etc., and we're usually less sure of our long term plans so it makes more sense to apply to a wide range of schools.  After getting his LSAT score, Tetris is probably just now starting to think seriously about which schools he might go to.  If I were him, I'd prefer to apply to a lot of schools, and have a year to think about where to go, rather than take a couple months to try to narrow down which schools to apply to (while studying for a retake - I think he should be spending all of his time studying for the LSAT and maybe beginning to get together some thoughts on his PS, instead of spending serious time narrowing down his school choices, or spending time on this site for that matter).  Fourth, most people told me I didn't need to apply any lower than T10.  They were right, but applying to a couple extra safeties ended up helping a lot in negotiating.  I increased my offer at a lot of schools, but since I can only go to one school, I'll just mention that I got an extra $14,000 at the school I'm going to, which was an indirect result of the money I got at safeties.  This might not happen every time, but for me, a couple hundred extra bucks is worth the potential to get several thousand.

But did you find that T14s really considered non-T14s, when it came to scholarship matching?  That wasn't my experience.  T14s seem pretty limited in their definitions of peer schools.

yea CLS bascially told us that they are a top school and would only consider offers from other top schools


I think you're right about this.

The Dean of Admissions at Penn told me they would consider UVA, MICH, and the top 5.



Pretty snooty for a school that was ranked 12 not long ago.

I can understand schools not *matching* a lower-ranked school's offer, but if that lower-ranked school is offering a full-ride, that would seem to give you some leverage. 

Haha yeah I know.  But like deedee just said, Penn admissions/financial aid were extremely nice, understanding, easy to work with, etc., as opposed to schools like NYU.  And who knows, they may have kinda considered Cornell and NW, even if they said they wouldn't.

104
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Question on NYU
« on: July 05, 2007, 01:05:45 AM »
Does anyone have information comparing the cost of living between NYC and Chicago?

NYC is a lot more.

105
I looked through the glass menagerie and there were no montanans. Next year there will be at least 2. Oh and Bosco remind me to answer your ? later when im home at a keyboard

Answer my ? later when you're at a keyboard.

106
Affirmative Action / Re: How Do You Feel About Affirmative Action?
« on: July 04, 2007, 08:19:30 PM »
My argument was simply that because the LSAT is racially neutral, and the student has the ability to choose a school that fits them, therefore everyone has an equal shot at admission to law school without affirmative action.  Therefore, the admissions process will work itself out to ensure that there is a diverse student body without requiring quotas, index boosts, etc.

But certain races do better than others on the LSAT, even if the test is racially neutral.  If you were to get rid of AA at, for example, Harvard, there would probably be very few people now considered URMs at Harvard - meaning the student body would not be "diverse" - at least not in the way that the term "diverse" is usually used in regards to student bodies. 

So we get rid of AA --> schools are not "diverse" anymore.  I think you agree with that.  But you're saying that over time, schools will become diverse?  How will this happen?  (Sorry if this is tedious, but I'm not sure exactly what you're saying.)


107
3.82 (~3.77 LSAC?) History/Poli Sci double, LSAT: 167, Lots of leadership, URM + created a Native American Studies Program at my undergrad, great Recs (including a Duke JD who also taught there in the 90s), should well on my PS/DS.

T14 + Vandy/UT/GW/Emory

It really depends on how good your soft factors are and how well you present them. You probably have a good shot at Yale, but the retake might be worth it to retake. You should have CCN, and I would say a really good shot at YS, but if you think you could do better on the retake it might be worth it.


 :D I hope you are right!

FWIW, I think he's right - I don't see any need for you to apply outside T14.  I would also strongly consider a retake.

I've decided not to make a decision right now.  :D I'm going to spend the rest of July getting my LOR/PS/DS/Resume/Transcripts in order. THEN at the end of the month, I'll study a bit, take a PT, and decide. So, we will see!

Sounds like a good plan.  It's not like you would ever need more than 2 months restudying.

108
i always meant to as you MP, were you born in Montana?  You are the first person I know from there.

Nope, I was born in Washington at an Army Base - which leads me to a question I was thinking about as I was drying my hair (random I know): when you're asked for your hometown, what do you put? The town/city you live in currently, or the place you were born, or just the place you identify most with out of all the ones you've lived in?  Because I have 7 places I could possibly list, but I'm never sure which one.


ah i c.  how long have you lived there/where have you lived before?

i don't have your prob...i've lived in the same place since i was 2 months old

Well that's part of the problem - I was born in Tacoma, WA but only lived there for 6 months. Then my dad got transferred (Air Force) to Korea and we lived there 4 1/2 years. Then Arizona for 2 years, Florida for 2 years, Hawaii for 4 years (4th-7th grade), Texas for a year, then my dad retired and we moved to Montana. 7 years so far. But I'm reluctant to claim MT as my hometown (and my parents are moving in a couple years anyway, probably back to Washington)

First semester freshman year I wrote an education paper on having more unified, national standards, curriculua, etc. for education.  One of my points was that students who move around a lot get screwed because different districts/states can have very different curricula.  From your experience, is there any validity to that?

109
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Question on NYU
« on: July 04, 2007, 07:37:10 PM »
That all being said, it might actually make you stand out more if you were a conservative student with excellent grades who wants a clerkship coming from Columbia, as opposed to Chicago.   

I hope the same holds true for a liberal student at Chicago.  :-\

110
i always meant to as you MP, were you born in Montana?  You are the first person I know from there.

Nope, I was born in Washington at an Army Base - which leads me to a question I was thinking about as I was drying my hair (random I know): when you're asked for your hometown, what do you put? The town/city you live in currently, or the place you were born, or just the place you identify most with out of all the ones you've lived in?  Because I have 7 places I could possibly list, but I'm never sure which one.


ah i c.  how long have you lived there/where have you lived before?

i don't have your prob...i've lived in the same place since i was 2 months old

Same here.  My parents have been living in the same house for 35 years.

Pages: 1 ... 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 ... 37