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Messages - iscoredawaitlist

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71
Incoming 1Ls / Re: computers in class
« on: November 30, 2007, 06:11:56 PM »
I take my notes by computer and outline by hand. But I don't think there are many who follow that quirk.

72
No.

If people from T14 schools go to secondary markets, it's primarily because of personal connections or QOL issues.


or they bombed virtually every test and finished dead last.

and that makes no economic sense.  there are 180 Yale J.D.s each year, and most of them sure as hell don't even consider Austin.  i would imagine that luring them from NYC would require a little extra.

You're out of your mind. Austin has one of the best quality of living in America (http://money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/bplive/2006/snapshots/PL4805000.html).

1) No state income tax.
2) Many firms in Texas (including Fulbright) pay NYC market (160k) rate. You don't get extra bucks for going to Yale or elsewhere.
3) Cost of Living is way lower.


So let's reiterate: yes, as a Yale grad you're going to earn as much money as some T2 (such as Baylor) grads. Despite a belief you may somehow be superior to these people, hiring partners are unlikely to buy it.

Among other reasons, you go to a higher ranked school to give you a better chance at landing a good job. In the aggregate, Baylor graduates will pale in comparison to Harvard grads. But that doesn't mean that all Baylor grads earn less money than Harvard grads.

For what it's worth, you'd have to pay me a hundred thousand dollars or more than my nearest offer to make me even consider working in New York. I'd never pretend that "most" T14 grads would want to go to Texas or other "mid-markets," but many will choose it either now or down the line.

Or look at it this way: do you think firms have any interest in trying to pull in people from prestige schools who have no interest in remaining there after they've made a few bucks? They're smarter than that. They're paying 160k as an investment, not because you're actually worth that to them right away.

73
Well just a theory I guess, but if you say that Top schools focus more on "thinking" like a lawyer, and lower schools focus more on "learning" (black letter) law, then I think you have a general answer. Studying more doesn't necessarily help when the object is to think and conceptualize something, but it DOES help if you're trying to memorize and that kind of thing.

I can't explain Cornell.

I think conventional wisdom about people working harder at lower ranked schools because it's harder to get jobs may be correct, but I'm not really sure how much of a difference it makes. Fear can only motivate so much for so long.

74
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Question for USC law students
« on: November 27, 2007, 06:58:16 PM »
I saw on USC Law School's website that there is this one program where you study abroad in London School of Economics and Political Science for a year and graduate with both a JD and an LLM.  How competitive is it to get into that program?

A good question. My impression is that it's not so much that it's competitive as it is that it requires you to give up a LOT to do it. That said, there are 4 spots a year for it, and variation in how many are applying by even a few will make it markedly more or less competitive.

I'm currently considering it, but the downsides to it are fairly large.

75
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USC 1L taking questions
« on: November 20, 2007, 06:53:59 PM »


For people coming out of state, just know that LA is a car city. Whenever i hear people say that LA is all concrete, I just laugh. There are few places in the world where you could surf on a great beach on Friday and then go snowboarding the next day.  There are tons of trails and places to go hiking, we're surrounded by mountains!

It's a whole helluva lot of concrete. Before coming I heard the "where else can you go from skiing to swimming in the ocean in one day" thing a lot. While it's nice and it illustrates that there are options around, it's kind of misleading: this is not an American Interlaken.



You went swimming in the ocean in Interlaken?

I'm talented

76
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USC 1L taking questions
« on: November 20, 2007, 05:27:26 PM »


For people coming out of state, just know that LA is a car city. Whenever i hear people say that LA is all concrete, I just laugh. There are few places in the world where you could surf on a great beach on Friday and then go snowboarding the next day.  There are tons of trails and places to go hiking, we're surrounded by mountains!

It's a whole helluva lot of concrete. Before coming I heard the "where else can you go from skiing to swimming in the ocean in one day" thing a lot. While it's nice and it illustrates that there are options around, it's kind of misleading: this is not an American Interlaken.


77
In LSAC studies, the LSAT correlates to first year GPA at about .4 which is fairly low. It's still higher than the .25 that UGPA correlates to first year GPA though.

78
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USC 1L taking questions
« on: November 19, 2007, 12:03:24 AM »
How "college-friendly" is Los Angeles?  When I think of LA, I think of an awesome city with a lot to do, but I'm concerned that it might cater to the famous and the mega-wealthy.

It's an expensive city if you let it be. Rent will be expensive pretty much no matter what. My girlfriend's place is around 1400 for a 2bedroom in hollywood, but that's about as cheap as i've heard anywhere. I pay about 920 to share my two bedroom apartment in grad housing.

Going out can be really expensive if you figure either paying for a cab or paying for parking, but if you share it with enough people it's not terrible. You can certainly find things to do that don't cost nearly that much. I don't go out all that much, and as a result I don't spend too much.

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Are there any decent places for recreation (parks, trails, etc?)  How's USC's gym?

There probably are, but I haven't seen them. LA is one big hunk of concrete for the most part. USC's gym is adequate. I play racquetball there quite a bit with my roommate, and it serves me well for that. For a large size university, I'd say that it's pretty good but not spectacular.

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How spread out are the students that don't make it into the housing that you are at?  How bad do the commutes get?

They're really spread out. The commutes vary from 5 minutes to an hour. It really depends where you're okay living.

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Outside of USC, do you think the people in LA are ultra stuck-up/fake in any way?  (There has been a trend of every stereotype being very far from the truth, I'm hoping this one is as well)

This is something that I was really worried about when I came here, but it really hasn't been a problem. I'm sure there are stuck-up/fake people as this is the center of the entertainment world, but it doesn't touch my life often.

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According to student surveys, USC students study less than those at 99% of law schools.  Do you think this is accurate?

That's interesting. It's hard for me to really compare to other schools since I don't go to other schools. I'd say we study a fair amount. but it's not extreme. I don't really understand what people would study for 6 hours a day every day. I can't see that being helpful at all. And to be fair, 3 hours a day when you're already in class for 2-6 hours already is still pretty significant. I usually stay in the library after class for 2-3 hours so that I don't have to lug my books back with me, I'll get to school early once or twice a week to work for a while and I usually make it to school for 5-6 hours one of the days of the weekends. The only thing I do at home are my memos, and that adds a significant chunk of "study" time to my week if I have one due.

Ask me after I get my grades back, but the vast majority of law isn't putting hours into the books. It's all about "getting it" and that doesnt' necessarily come from putting in more hours than another person.

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I like meeting new people.  Do you think USC students get a chance to meet more than their ~170 classmates?

It's fairly difficult. I met and started dating a sound editor this semester, but I think I'm in the minority there. There are some people who will have lived in LA and have friends from before who you'll probably get to meet, but you'll find yourself almost exclusively hanging out with law school people. That's just the way it is.

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How bad is the transportation like in LA?  Is there any late-night public transportation?  Can you waive down taxis?

Terrible. There are buses and there's a metro, but I've taken neither. I got a car here about a month in (a wonderful civic hybrid that I'd recommend to anyone) and it improved my life a lot, but the traffic here sucks. My girlfriend lives in hollywood about 5 miles away and if I leave at the wrong time it can take me 40-45 minutes to get to her place.

You can certainly waive down taxis, and if you go out to clubs and bars in the hot spots, they're all over.

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How bad is the area around campus?

Not that bad really. I wouldn't want to walk alone at night if I was a girl, but it's not terrible. There's definitely crime around, but it's mostly not directed at students. The best advice is to be smart, and you'll avoid most problems. That said, the area is run down, and I wouldn't live here unless you're living in the grad housing.

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What are the 2-3 biggest cons about USC in relation to other schools in the 15-25 range?  What type of person should not go?  What type of career is not fostered as well there compared to other schools?  On the flip side, what are the 2-3 biggest pros, what type of person should go, and what type of career does USC foster better than its peers?

Cons:
1. The focus is definitely on Southern California. It's not necessarily that the reach is only SoCal, but when 80-90% of your student body wants to practice here, wouldn't you spend the majority of your resources on cultivating that? Basically what this means is that if you want to leave Southern California, firms don't find you, you have to find the firms. At least this is what I've gotten from talking to 2 and 3Ls.
2.  I'm not sure there's really any career that USC doesn't foster, but common wisdom is that our international law is pretty weak. That's a priority of the Dean's, though, so I expect at least some inroads to be made on that by the time you graduate.
3. The writing class is both graded and curved. Also, there's a separate research class that takes up a significant amount of time in the first part of each semester. These two things suck. There's no need to curve a class of 16 people. Also, my writing prof is really bad (this is the exception rather than the rule, however.)

Pros:
1. The class size is tiny. 195 is our current tally. There are 64 people in my big section (4 smaller sections combined), and compared to other places, that's really small. It means you get lots of interaction if you want it.
2. The school definitely cares for its students, and not just in ways that will get it rankings bumps.
3. The students are laid back for the most part, and they're pretty happy. Sun will do this for you.
4. USC especially fosters entertainment law. There are plenty of opportunities to get your foot in the door with this. I haven't had any interest in this, so I don't know first hand, but it seems that my friends who want to do this are going to things all the time. Also, the Public Interest is huge at USC. There are millions of "PILF" clinics you can do even as a 1L.

I can't think of any more at the moment, but I'm sure as discussions progress more will come out.

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so it's close to the ugrad rez? strike that. where does everyone else live?

it's actually north of campus, so it's not actually by any of the undergrad residences, but the off-campus housing around is occupied by a lot of undergrads. People live all over from Long Beach to Pasadena to West Hollywood to Downtown.

79
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USC 1L taking questions
« on: November 18, 2007, 09:10:55 PM »
Why USC instead of your other admits? what made the difference? from your LSN you didn't seem all that sold at first...?
I visited W&M, Emory and USC. BU was out because I wanted to get away from the cold unless I had a good reason not to (i.e. Michigan).

At first I didn't think much of USC mainly because I didn't think much of LA or California in general. I applied because I felt I needed another target, mostly. I think also I saw it as the second best law school in a market which I think is common for east coasters given a lack of knowledge of the schools.

What sold me was visiting. Visiting didn't necessarily cure me of my bias against LA, but I loved the school. The main thing I found was that people were really happy, and no one felt like they were the second best school in LA. To me, happiness is the number one thing to look for. It's a symptom of many things going right in the school.

I found at W&M that the people were really nice, but not all that ambitious, and really not focused at all on private practice. Its reach was also something of a worry. I found the people at Emory somewhat cold, and the atmosphere was more of the "just survive law school" approach rather than a genuine enjoyment of the place. I do quite like Atlanta though.

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Does the reputation of USC in general hold true in law school?
Do you mean "University of Spoiled Children"? If so, it doesn't much. There are a few rich kids who don't really seem to understand that not everyone has the money to spend, but they're by far the minority. Everyone pretty much is at USC because they're smart and driven.


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How's living in the rez/that neighborhood in general? Is it primarily kids direct from undergrad?
It's not very nice, but it's not that terrible. It's loud on weekends with the sounds of undergrads partying (halloween was especially loud), but it's not unlivable. Actually, I think if you asked people here, they'd rather get rid of the church across the street than the undergrads around. You can pretty easily tune out the undergrads as you go to sleep, but tuning out the horrible singing while you work is much harder.

I will, however, be glad to move elsewhere next year.

80
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USC 1L taking questions
« on: November 18, 2007, 08:43:45 PM »
I was PMed a few minutes ago who asked me to make a thread like this. Since it's already here, I thought I'd just bump it. If you do have any questions, please feel free to ask. However, I'll reiterate what I've already said: my ability to determine your chances of getting in are no better than most other people on this board.

The best questions are those that I'll know from personal experience rather than reading off of a website.

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