Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - marcusbarnes30

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10
31
I hate to say it but my personal experience would support your hypothesis. Too many of my peers who claimed to want to attend law school didn't even do the research, much less formally study. However, I'm loathe to extrapoliate a generality from my own anctedotal evidence.

Quote
My opinion about the LSAT is simple, I just don't think we take it as seriously as our white counterparts. White folks and asians approach preparation for the LSAT with a level of somberness and discipline that we typically don't. I know I am generalizing and the evidence I could present would be anecdotal anyway, but I think most would tend to agree. It has always been my contention that if brothers and sisters studied for the LSAT like they studied information when they were pledging (i.e. poems, prior lines,history...etc) we have on average scores in the mid to high 160s. There is no reason in terms of racial bias that person who graduated with 3.5+ gpa (regardless of the major) can't overcome any biases racial or otherwise if they have had the intellectual fortitude and academic discipline to secure a 3.5 at graduation in the first place, bUT WHAT DO I KNOW?


Thank you.
I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that studying for the LSAT is a rather abstract process in comparison to college coursework. Also, 99.99999% of people who make 168 and above have put in a level of committment that most people choose opt of. There are people that study this damn test for a year, some six months and others 3 months 3hours a day. Miss Cuibono I think you would be mistaken to suggest that on average we study for the test with the same amount of intensity as our white and asian counterparts

32
But my question is why Law. I don't have any statistics at my immediate disposal, but it really seems as though there are more Black male doctors, MBAs, PHDs and other post graduates than lawyers. Even within my own Frat(we almost 101 years old) I know of only a handful of brothers that aspire to be lawyers and even fewer who are lawyers. Is there something about the practice of law that we as educated Black men are turned off by?? Is it a lack of interest? What?

Actually the answer to this could be somewhat a look into the socio-psychological aspect of it all. Care to explain Pulchy? Why yes, I'm glad you asked ;) (Ok that was corny, but stay with me please).

Think about it, at least in the perception of black males what entity in the United States besides the political entity has been the most unfair and unjust to us? Yes exactly right the LEGAL system. Hold on though, I'm not at all saying that most of the AA men in prison are innocent, but there are more than a few that feel as if they have received a raw deal. There is such an amazing distrust in the law and anything legal that is ingrained in  African-American males that Law School is the furthest away from our minds as far as career opportunities.

The other institutions mentioned don't quite have the same effect on AA men as in law. Yes it's true that some feel that the medical community has no real interest in them, but the consequences of bad health doesn't hold the same emotional bind as spending a significant portion of your life behind bars.

So as a rebuttal one can say "yes Pulchy, I can see your point, but not all black men feel as if their life is leading them on the "prison career path" - (yes one can argue that the disproportionate amount of AA males in prison is almost like it being a career path. BTW that was meant to be tongue in cheek.)- but even amongst the achievers of the AA male community knows of or is related to another black male that in their eyes have been mistreated in the justice system. This leads to distrust in the legal system even with black males who aren't in the system themselves. Also for the achieving AA males that are upstanding citizens they sometimes feel that they are one traffic stop away from being just "anudda nigra"...see Crash the movie.

Basically there is just a general dis-ease about the legal system that African-American males have. Some of it unfounded I will admit, but as we all know sometimes perception is reality. Oh and there is the issue of that LSAT. So from the very few who do aspire to become lawyers, a lot are eliminated from the process because of the test. I'm not gonna go into what is fair and what isn't, I'll just say that the assessment is brutal to African-American males for a variety of reasons, therefore reducing the pool of aspirants even further.

Oh and why doesn't this seem to affect the African-American females as much? That is a very good question, and one of the answers is one of the reasons why I respect black women so much.(Warning this explanation will follow a path of digression). From the overall theory of oppression it seems as if the most efficient way to oppress a group of people is to attack and retard the progression of the leader or head of a particular group. In this case it was the black males. Through humiliation and demasculinization some of the inherent strengths of black males has been tapped. This led to a self replicating and almost indelible cycle of underachieving in the AA male community. Through it all the one pillar of strength and the glue who kept it all together has historically been the black woman. They have been the ones to step up to the plate and hold things down including playing dual roles in the family. So to me at least there is no surprise in seeing African American females doing so well in contrast to African-American males. This is my personal opinion here, but I feel as if the Majority feels less threatened by an upward bound population of black women than an upward bound community of black men, so they are more likely to promote the upward movement of "sisters" over "brothers". Again this is just my opinion.


Cliff Notes version: Basically there is a general uneasiness,distrust, and ignorance in the legal system in the eyes of black males, which could explain the lack of knowledge and interest in attaining legal education or even starting the legal education process.







My opinion about the LSAT is simple, I just don't think we take it as seriously as our white counterparts. White folks and asians approach preparation for the LSAT with a level of somberness and discipline that we typically don't. I know I am generalizing and the evidence I could present would be anecdotal anyway, but I think most would tend to agree. It has always been my contention that if brothers and sisters studied for the LSAT like they studied information when they were pledging (i.e. poems, prior lines,history...etc) we have on average scores in the mid to high 160s. There is no reason in terms of racial bias that person who graduated with 3.5+ gpa (regardless of the major) can't overcome any biases racial or otherwise if they have had the intellectual fortitude and academic discipline to secure a 3.5 at graduation in the first place, bUT WHAT DO I KNOW?

33
But my question is why Law. I don't have any statistics at my immediate disposal, but it really seems as though there are more Black male doctors, MBAs, PHDs and other post graduates than lawyers. Even within my own Frat(we almost 101 years old) I know of only a handful of brothers that aspire to be lawyers and even fewer who are lawyers. Is there something about the practice of law that we as educated Black men are turned off by?? Is it a lack of interest? What?

34
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Who Pwns D.C.
« on: June 29, 2007, 09:26:13 AM »
bump

35
Law School Applications / Re: Early Admit Agreements
« on: June 29, 2007, 09:15:18 AM »
Are the contracts for early admit/early decisions bull or do schools have a fairly sophisticated cross-reference system set in place to ding you automatically if you brake break the "covenant"

ex. uva and columbia both have policies relegating applicants to applying for EA/ED to only their school and their admittance would not be forefeited(ithinkthatshowyouspellit) otherwise.

I'm a little confused by the use of "relegating" in this context.  The whole sentence confuses me, actually.  All I can say is that if a school finds out that you are attending another school after being accepted ED to a school with a binding contract, the ED school has the right to contact your new school and tell them the circumstances.  I'm sure they can find out pretty easily through LSAC which schools you applied to.  hth.

since i am being picked on...the word relegated was used in the context of an issue or matter being "assigned"

Since I was perhaps picking on you a wee bit, "assigned" is a contract term of art with a very specific meaning having to do with the granting of rights to one who was not an original party to the contract. It's not appropriate in this circumstance.

You WIN!

36
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Who Pwns D.C.
« on: June 28, 2007, 04:54:10 PM »
In your eyes who really owns D.C. in terms of firm placement. UVa is ahead of Gtown in the rankings, but does the fact that it is not in DC offset Gtowns lower ranking and larger class size? Additionialy, with UPenn being a haircut and a shave away from DC all things being equal if a JD only sought firm placement in DC which school would he/she be better off with? Feel free to make sweeping generalization and/or comment in absolutes. >:(

37
Law School Applications / Re: Early Admit Agreements
« on: June 28, 2007, 12:41:55 PM »


since i am being picked on...the word relegated was used in the context of an issue or matter being "assigned"


Please do not confuse "being picked on" with "being offered candid responses intended to help keep me out of serious trouble."

RESPECT booyaakahsha

38
Law School Applications / Re: Early Admit Agreements
« on: June 28, 2007, 09:31:23 AM »
Are the contracts for early admit/early decisions bull or do schools have a fairly sophisticated cross-reference system set in place to ding you automatically if you brake break the "covenant"

ex. uva and columbia both have policies relegating applicants to applying for EA/ED to only their school and their admittance would not be forefeited(ithinkthatshowyouspellit) otherwise.

I'm a little confused by the use of "relegating" in this context.  The whole sentence confuses me, actually.  All I can say is that if a school finds out that you are attending another school after being accepted ED to a school with a binding contract, the ED school has the right to contact your new school and tell them the circumstances.  I'm sure they can find out pretty easily through LSAC which schools you applied to.  hth.

since i am being picked on...the word relegated was used in the context of an issue or matter being "assigned"

39
Law School Applications / Early Admit Agreements
« on: June 27, 2007, 05:03:09 PM »
Are the contracts for early admit/early decisions bull or do schools have a fairly sophisticated cross-reference system set in place to ding you automatically if you brake the "covenant"

ex. uva and columbia both have policies relegating applicants to applying for EA/ED to only their school and their admittance would not be forefeited(ithinkthatshowyouspellit) otherwise.

40
Just wanted to know you all's thoughts on why there is such a shortage of Black men pursuing law school. It seems that given the level of effort in becoming a doctor, enginee...etc there would be a pipeline of black male law students in place. Comparatively,  Sistuhs seem to be doing there thing. It took me two years to after I received my MBA to realize I wanted to go to law school and looking back I don't know why the hell that interest took so long to generate??

Any thoughts

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10