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Messages - jacy85

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61
General Board / Re: Just started outlining now
« on: April 25, 2009, 01:41:10 PM »
I think you may be at the point where making your own outline isn't worth it anymore. Try to find old outlines and a good hornbook.

Agreed on getting an old outline from someone who had your prof in the last year or so.  Then spend a day or so updating it thoroughly.  Updating serves 2 purposes - first, you make sure the outline actually covers what you did in class, and second, it serves as a pretty good review of the material (which is sort of the point of outlining to begin with).

62
General Board / Re: Anyone Else Worried about OCI?
« on: April 19, 2009, 09:40:29 PM »

Iím afraid Fall 2009 OCI will be an absolute bloodbath for those that went in thinking like this.

I fear you're absolutely right.  Fall 2008 was bad, I think this year will be worse, as firms try to protect the people they have, there's no real need for SAs.  With all the experienced talent cooling their heels right now, I think the only reason firms will still do OCI at all is to keep open the pipelines to the top schools through the downturn so as to not lose their edge to other firms once (if) the market recovers. 

Out of curiosity, does the condition of the market change the calculus at all for anyone who passed up free rides at TTT safety school in order to pay full fare at a Tier 1?  Less debt vs. even worse job prospects?

Don't kid yourself.  Firms aren't trying to protect anyone.  The only people the firms care about losing are the partners with books of business who are thinking of jumping ship.  As for associates, from junior to senior, they're all replaceable.

But the overall point is that until there's more work to do, firms won't tripping over themselves to hire anyone, least of all SAs.

How about "as firms try to avoid public layoffs of the people they have?"

Sure, avoiding public layoffs of attorneys already in the office is great. But I can guarantee a good number of firms will be conducting 6 month/1 year reviews of current first years and then make some "performance based decisions" to make room for incoming classes.  Of course, this is assuming the firm hasn't announced pushing back start dates until 2010 or outright rescinding offers.  These firms seem to be making at least some commitment to the attorneys already there.

63
General Board / Re: Anyone Else Worried about OCI?
« on: April 19, 2009, 05:28:19 PM »

Iím afraid Fall 2009 OCI will be an absolute bloodbath for those that went in thinking like this.

I fear you're absolutely right.  Fall 2008 was bad, I think this year will be worse, as firms try to protect the people they have, there's no real need for SAs.  With all the experienced talent cooling their heels right now, I think the only reason firms will still do OCI at all is to keep open the pipelines to the top schools through the downturn so as to not lose their edge to other firms once (if) the market recovers. 

Out of curiosity, does the condition of the market change the calculus at all for anyone who passed up free rides at TTT safety school in order to pay full fare at a Tier 1?  Less debt vs. even worse job prospects?

Don't kid yourself.  Firms aren't trying to protect anyone.  The only people the firms care about losing are the partners with books of business who are thinking of jumping ship.  As for associates, from junior to senior, they're all replaceable.

But the overall point is that until there's more work to do, firms won't tripping over themselves to hire anyone, least of all SAs.

64
Not having any loans at all does change things.  Right now (and for a long time to come, most likely, until law school fundamentally changes and isn't so overpriced), there are SO many law school grads with a mountain of loans and either no job or a job with pay that makes those monthly loan payments a crippling burden.

As for what BA degree to get, more challenging degrees may help you if you have a high gpa; but over all, the primary focus will likely be on the gpa alone.  So get a degree in what ever makes you happy (or whatever makes you least miserable)

65
Why have you decided on law as a career?  Are you interested in the law at all?  Or is your primary motivation to get a well paying job to support your family?

If it's the latter, than law school is a horrible decision unless you get a decent scholarship that isn't tied to high academic performance (i.e. you have to maintain a 3.0 when the school's curve is set at 2.7).  Otherwise you'll be saddling your young family with a huge amount of debt and a potentially high likelihood of not having a well paying job (and well paying is relative to the amount you have to pay in loans each month).

66
General Board / Re: Note Taking
« on: April 16, 2009, 07:15:33 AM »
Ultimately, what you do should what works best for you/what you feel most comfortable with.  There is no one way to take notes.

What ultimately worked best for me was this:  I used my laptop and took notes in OneNote.  I loved the organization features.  I busted my ass doing my class reading and took excellent and thorough reading notes.  Then, when I was in class, I would highlight topics from the reading my professor emphasized and added things that were missing.  I ended up taking down relatively few notes, as most of the information was already there.  And I did surf the internet/played solitaire while I was sitting in class.

But this worked for me because I learn best while reading and taking notes.  Class just gave some additional focus and narrowed down the information from the reading.

Other people, especially those who are advising you to never, never do anything in class other than giving 100% attention to the professor, may learn best in lecture.

So go back to the prelaw boards, have some fun for the next few months, but think about what classes you did best in while in undergrad and how those classes were set up.  This way you can get an idea of what type of learning style suits you best.

67
General Board / Re: Question about morals in a career in law
« on: April 14, 2009, 10:34:56 PM »
Let me summarize:  "Yatta, yatta and yatta."

When you're a laywer, he who pays you is right.  Full stop.  Obviously, you don't lie and you don't suppress or hide information... but there is no moral conflict.  This is your profession:  deal with it.


Some people might practice law like that, but not everyone does.

68
General Board / Re: Should I quit?
« on: April 08, 2009, 09:49:42 PM »
Only stay in law school if you want to be a lawyer, donít stay if you whole purpose was just to increase your salary over other job. There are easier and more satisfying ways to make money then going to law school to be a lawyer if youíre not passionate about the being a lawyer thing. More $ as primary motivator for anything you have to go into a lot of debt for is not a good idea. If when itís all over being a lawyer is not enough to keep you happy regardless of pay, then donít go to law school to learn how to be one. 

Right on the money.  If all the OP wants is a bigger pay check with no interest at all in being a lawyer, he or she should get out now instead of wasting any more time and money.

69
General Board / Re: BarBri / PMBR -- are they necessary?
« on: April 08, 2009, 09:46:59 PM »
Bar/Bri is necessary; PMBR is not.

70
General Board / Re: Usefulness of print legal dictionaries?
« on: April 08, 2009, 09:46:13 PM »
I never used mine for class.  I did use it at home when it was easier to look the damn word up than open a browser page, got to westlaw, and type in the word.

I use it a lot more often now in practice, as my Black's is usually more reliable than google and the westlaw black's is no longer free.

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