Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - jacy85

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10 ... 832
41
Bar Exam / Re: Two Q's for BarBri alums: What and When
« on: June 04, 2009, 08:15:05 PM »
I didn't put nearly that amount of time in, but I was taking the GA bar, which is not nearly as rigorous as NY or CA.  If I had taken one of the more difficult bar exams, I'd likely would have been on a schedule similar to yours.

42
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Are study groups worth the trouble?
« on: May 30, 2009, 07:13:30 AM »
As others have mentioned, study groups can be beneficial.  The best method, IMHO, is to have a schedule where everyone does practice tests and you discuss them.  This allows you to see what issues you may have missed, and it encourages you to study at a consistent pace which is conducive to learning the law.

However, choose your study partners wisely!  So many study groups devolve into "parties" rather than studying. 

Also, note that Wally's right: be wary of discussing irrelevant materials such as sub-sub-points or crazy policy tangents. 

I could have typed this post myself.  This was exactly how my study group functioned.  There was a core group of 2 or 3 of us, and occasionally we had 4 or 5 people.  Our core group did very well and we all ended up pretty highly ranked.

43
Bar Exam / Re: Two Q's for BarBri alums: What and When
« on: May 29, 2009, 09:25:31 PM »
1.  I used primarily the handout book we filled in during lecture and I made my own flash cards.  I went to the conviser when I needed something filled in.  I can probably count on one hand the number of times I cracked the big outlines.  Doing the questions, both MBE and essay will definitely help you learn the law.  But a word of advice - do NOT compare your answers to Bar/Bri's "sample answers".  They try to tell you that their answers are "real" but it's complete BS.  Definitely read their answers - it's a good review of the law.  But when it comes time to gauge  how your answers are coming out, see if your state has real past answers on the bar website or something similar.

2.  Don't freak about the Bar/Bri schedule.  It's next to impossible to stick to it.  During the time we had lecture, I went to lecture, made all my index cards from the day's handouts.  I would then do some of the MBE sets.  It was pretty much 9-5.  Then, after our last class, I then had the entire month of July to do nothing but write essays, do MBE questions, and go through my index cards.

Ultimately, don't forget what worked for you in law school.  Use the study methods that are proven to work for you.

44
General Board / Re: Tips for law review write-on?
« on: May 26, 2009, 07:16:09 AM »
The part I am wondering about is writing on worth the extra effort. By that, I mean not just the time spent writing the Note to qualify, but the extra work required for law review during the rest of school. How much extra time is required for the work, and did anyone find that it took away from studying for other classes?

No one can really answer this, as at varies widely from journal to journal, school to school.  In some cases, journal/LR isn't a lot of extra work.  In other cases, it is a huge time commitment. 

For me, it was a HUGE amount of work, but I would say that without a doubt that it was worth it.  It sucked, but I will always have that qualification on my resume, along with a line for being a published author.  And in this market, anything you have on your resume that might distinguish you from the next guy/girl is a good thing to have. 

45
General Board / Re: Overall most important post-1L course?
« on: May 23, 2009, 08:29:31 AM »
I agree with Matthies.

But for doctrinal courses, I'd say Business Associations/Corporations for anyone.  I'm a litigator and have been so glad to know a bit about corporate structure and the very, very basics of securities law.  It's even more important on the transactional side.  Evidence is also very important for litigators.

There really isn't a hard and fast rule on anything.  Even if you dont' take these courses, you can learn what you need to.  And with no information about what your interests are, it's hard to say.  Someone who is 100% sure they'll be a transactional attorney doesn't really need evidence, but someone who is going to head into a DA or PD's office and practice non-white collar crim law doesn't really need Biz Associations.  So it's all relative.

46
I thought the lectures were a mixed bag.

Substantively, some were incredible.  Some were horrible and not worth getting up for in the morning.

But some instructors were much better than others regarding giving tips and advice on actually taking the bar.  Prof. Whitebread was great, as was Prof. Espstein for Ks.  This type of advice couldn't be found anywhere in the materials. 

Not that it makes a difference at this point for anyone, since the time to reverse course and take a bar course is past.  So I'll also advise ryanjm and others studying on their own to NOT blow off the MPT if your state has it.  The lectures devote a whole class to it, but if you're on your own, you might blow it off.  They are horrific time crunches, and if you've never really looked at the MPT before, you're going to F it up.  (if you state doesn't have the MPT, lucky you!).

47
General Board / Re: Law student journal?
« on: May 19, 2009, 06:56:17 AM »
It's not a diary.  Law journals and law reviews are academic publications.  You either grade on or have to compete in a writing competition to "make" journal or LR, and then you get the privilege of working your ass off 2L year writing your own academic paper while cite checking and editing the articles your journal or LR has chose to publish in the upcoming volumes.

Yes, I know that, thanks. I'm talking about something else, but I guess no one knows.

Um...well, if you were really talking about something else, perhaps you could enlighten us as to what it was?  Because the only type of journal I've seen discussed on LSD is the law review type.

48
Transferring / Re: Should I transfer?
« on: May 17, 2009, 08:09:07 PM »
If you seriously want to practice in Seattle, then transfer.  There really isn't anything to think about here, as NESL is completely unknown on the West Coast unless you can find an alum or two.  More importantly, you have very little opportunity to network in the market you want to work in.

49
General Board / Re: Law student journal?
« on: May 17, 2009, 08:04:32 PM »
It's not a diary.  Law journals and law reviews are academic publications.  You either grade on or have to compete in a writing competition to "make" journal or LR, and then you get the privilege of working your ass off 2L year writing your own academic paper while cite checking and editing the articles your journal or LR has chose to publish in the upcoming volumes.

50
There are more openings, I think, because a lot of people don't really want to live in rural Texas, rural Georgia, etc.  So they either don't take the job, or if they do, they leave and move closer to a metro area as soon as they can. 

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10 ... 832