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Messages - jarhead

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31
General Board / Re: Possibiility of working with FBI?
« on: July 10, 2007, 02:00:24 PM »
i originally applied for the FBI Phase 1 special agent postion when i was still in the military, i got out in '03. they just called me two weeks ago to see if i was still interested in phase II and i've had a full scope security clearance since 1998 (meaning i don't have to go through as rigorous a background check). 1.5 years is the time they tell everybody but realistically it takes 2-5 years from the time you apply until you enter into active service (if you have a squeeky clean record). that's for any government job that requires a security clearance, not just the FBI. do not work for the FBI. special agents start out at GS-10 which is somewhere around 50K. it takes an average of 10 years(if you're a jack bauer type) to, like most people, 15-20 years to get to a GS-15 which is somewhere around 100K. above that is the executive schedule 115K and above, but you have to wait for someone to die or retire to make that and there will be a long line of people ahead of you who've been waiting longer. if you want to work for the goverment with a law degree, the justice department is a better option.

Parts of what you say is true, parts are not.  I have a government job with a security clearance and it did NOT take 2.5 years to get lol.  I interviewed right out of college and was hired 6 months later. 

Also, most government positions are career ladder positions.  3 years later, I'm a GS-12 and eligible for my GS-13 very soon.  It's beyond 13 that things can take a while, but with the current climate of retirees it is a pretty good time to be a fed.  However, a lot depends on your series.  I'm in a pretty high demand series so the pay grade jumps have been good to me, however, there are a TON of higher grade attorneys in the government right now and therefore it is slow moving past GS-12 in many agencies.

It all depends on what you want.  I have no desire to work for the feds after law school.  If I did, I wouldn't be going through the hell that is law school because I can make a good government wage without it.


uh all of what i am saying is correct. if you got yours in 6 months then your security clearance was expidited, doesn't mean your're fully cleared they just grant you the lowest clearance you need to get into the building depending on the agency you work for. whichever agency you work for will still do a full scope etc. if you're not in the intelligence field series codes (0132) or (1811) then the the clearance process is different and less stringent. FBI special agents and intelligence support postions fall under the intellgence job series (0132) and (1811). they will still do a full scope background investigation which unless you've never had even a parking ticket can not be completed in 6 months. the FBI and some other agencies do not give expidited clearances. you have to be fully cleared and polygraphed before you can step foot in the building. in the 10 years i've been working in the IC i've never seen that entire process take less than 1 year and that's if they are really desperate. back to the FBI, they will still make you go through the entire security /polygraph process regardless of your current clearance status. if you have a clearance than you know how stupid and time wasting that is. even if you've just had your 5 year update they still take you through the entire process and re-polygraph you. i worked in the intelligence field from 1998- June 2007 for NSA CIA and DIA. i've not worked for FBI because their process is the long, time consuming and redundant. 

32
yeah i was gonna say the whole skirt suit thing sounded like something out of the 50's but i didn't wanna encroach on the ladies territory.

33
Black sweats and a hoodie.  Make sure your shoes are adidas though.




 :D :D nice dont' forget the bling

34
Hmm... I dont remember exactly what I paid for my suits, but neither one was over $400 given the clearance sale on both.  Both are brand names too (Brooks Brother's and Burberry), but were lower end suits by their respective brands.  I havent heard any negative comments on my suits yet, so I guess they look fine.


brooks brothers and burberry make fine suits. everyone is caught up on the price the point is get a nice suit. you got your's on clearance so they were cheaper, good. i borrowed the money from my parents for my first legit job suit. they were happy to give it, i paid them back.  this is not just "an interview suit" most of you will be wearing it to work. believe me when you guys start working as associates at your respective firms you will understand why $400.00 bucks for a suit is a sale. right now is the best time to look for a suit for August interviews. all of last years summer and winter suits will be on sale at the better department stores in order to make way for this year's stuff. nordstrom, bloomindales, neiman marcus etc. check it out i already got a nice pin stripped black (yes black) Ralph Lauren, notched lapel, single breasted, side vented, two button for $350. marked down from $850.00 at nordstrom alterations were free. they got some blues and dark greys left....

35
General Board / Re: Possibiility of working with FBI?
« on: July 09, 2007, 05:43:40 PM »
i originally applied for the FBI Phase 1 special agent postion when i was still in the military, i got out in '03. they just called me two weeks ago to see if i was still interested in phase II and i've had a full scope security clearance since 1998 (meaning i don't have to go through as rigorous a background check). 1.5 years is the time they tell everybody but realistically it takes 2-5 years from the time you apply until you enter into active service (if you have a squeeky clean record). that's for any government job that requires a security clearance, not just the FBI. do not work for the FBI. special agents start out at GS-10 which is somewhere around 50K. it takes an average of 10 years(if you're a jack bauer type) to, like most people, 15-20 years to get to a GS-15 which is somewhere around 100K. above that is the executive schedule 115K and above, but you have to wait for someone to die or retire to make that and there will be a long line of people ahead of you who've been waiting longer. if you want to work for the goverment with a law degree, the justice department is a better option.

36
General Board / Re: So my crap school has a guy working at Cravath
« on: July 08, 2007, 08:43:52 PM »
The bottom of the class at NYU or Columbia (and even at a couple of lower ranked schools) will still get 160k NYC if they want it. Cravath isn't a lock but once you hit T14 and, especially, T10, 160k in NYC is all but assured.



no one is arguing this, but making a statement about all big law firms based off of the one you happen to work at is what's not realistic. of course firms go deeper into classes of top 5-14 schools. but if you got to martindalehubbel or NALP you will be quite surprised at the myriad of schools representing at the big law firms, there are more than 5 by the way. if you're in a top 14 school great congratulations. but quit yanking your own you know what by implying that those who are not should "realistically" lower their expectations.

I can't tell if your use of the word realistic (or its derivations) twice in this post is supposed to indicate that you disagree with my assessment that, outside of the T14, it's unrealistic to expect to work in biglaw.  If so, perhaps I can refine that a little.  I'd agree that many schools just outside the T14 also place well in big law, for example, GW, UCLA, etc.  And there are also other schools that place well in their home market, for example, Fordham.  But at many, many law schools, and certainly virtually all schools in the third and fourth tier of US News, you have to be at the very top of the class to even be considered in biglaw.  Statistically, it's going to be a small group of people at these schools.  Perhaps we can agree that at many schools it's unlikely you will work in biglaw, rather than calling it unrealistic?

For what it's worth, I didn't go to a T14.  I went to a lower ranked school and excelled, so I've seen some of this first hand. 


i realized after i wrote it that i was addressing two different posts...i was half agreeing with your post while disagreeing with the "at my firm" guy. obvioulsy i'm not a lawyer yet but at the job i just left i worked in DC with lawyers every day for the past 9 years. in beltway terms i was a "consultant" which is a fancy way of saying i can't say what i actually did. you name a law school and i probably know someone who graduated from there, especially on the east coast. i got into harvard and a few other good schools this last cycle i'm thoroughly convinced because one of them put in a good word for me so i'm not being defensive. i said all that to say i read a lot of things on here that just are not true. this whole T14 or die is just BS, im sorry but it is. if you do well at a tier 1 school you have a realistic shot at a big law firm. you may not start in NYC but some of the regional branches of big law firms i.e. los angeles, s. florida, wherever in the south atlanta, texas whatever are not as particular. yes your chances for starting out with the wind at your back are great if you go to a T14 but the notion that you have to be 10% at your loser non 14 school is just bunk. i don't care what you're particular firm does there are a lot of lawyers out there who work in big law and make the big bucks who did not go to T14 schools. i know this because i worked with dozens of them every day for the past 9 years. i've also worked with the GT, Harvard, Yale guys and gals who think that they are god's gift because they went to those schools, usually they are not. it's usually the guy who went to the so called off brand law school (talking tier 1 still) who worked his as- off to get good grades (top 20%) who knows the law standing on his head. im not saying that all the T14 guys were like that because they weren't. but the ones who were were also the type that looked down on those who didn't have the pedigree. i've also had dealings with the firms, two here in washington come to mind, who only recruit from 1-5, who will only consider law review top 10% etc. from "lower ranked" schools etc. i personally would never want to work for any of those firms.  

37
General Board / Re: So my crap school has a guy working at Cravath
« on: July 08, 2007, 04:14:29 PM »
The bottom of the class at NYU or Columbia (and even at a couple of lower ranked schools) will still get 160k NYC if they want it. Cravath isn't a lock but once you hit T14 and, especially, T10, 160k in NYC is all but assured.



no one is arguing this, but making a statement about all big law firms based off of the one you happen to work at is what's not realistic. of course firms go deeper into classes of top 5-14 schools. but if you got to martindalehubbel or NALP you will be quite surprised at the myriad of schools representing at the big law firms, there are more than 5 by the way. if you're in a top 14 school great congratulations. but quit yanking your own you know what by implying that those who are not should "realistically" lower their expectations.

38
I'm going to jump in here and advise that men buy one really nice suit instead of two cheap ones if it is at all possible budget-wise. My husband has both and the difference a more expensive suit makes is actually quite noticeable. He spent about $450 on his new suit (major sale - it is an $800 suit) and it looks fantastic on him. The $200 suit just isn't as nice, the fabric doesn't look as good and the more expensive one just hangs better. Men are lucky and can get away with one nice suit and different shirts and ties. Women really do probably need 2-3 different suits.

For anyone looking to save some money, Nordstrom usually has a big sale in the end of July (it starts 7/20 this year) and you can get some good deals. I will probably be picking up a few more suits for myself at this sale for OCI, and shirts and ties for my husband. Nordstrom is more expensive than a lot of other places, but the service is good and at least for men, I think the suit alterations are free.

Macy's is also a good option, and a bit less expensive, and if you get their store credit card, you can often save 20%. For a major purchase that might be well worth it. Also surprisingly, Costco occasionally has dress shirts that are nice and fairly inexpensive.


thank you thank you thank you! this lady knows of what she speaks. i didn't want to come across as an a-hole but a $100.00 suit is really cheap and looks it. $400-500 is a bargain for a nice suit (meaning on sale). i know people argue the whole it's just a label thing but it's not. you do have to pay for quality when it comes to clothes.

39
General Board / Re: So my crap school has a guy working at Cravath
« on: July 08, 2007, 03:01:14 PM »
I wouldn't call it a pervasive myth -- it's largely true.  I don't think anyone on this board has ever said you must go to a T14 to have *any* chance of working in biglaw; rather, people have just said if you want to have a realistic chance of working in biglaw, you need to go to a T14.


i think you should read this board more thoroughly especially the prelaw side. i don't agree with realistic either...if you got to a T14 your chances are optimal yes, but to say that you can only or "realistically" get there from a T14 is not simply not true.

40
Isn't solid black suit only reserved for dinner event or funeral? 
Should I get stripe black suits for interview and work?


eeeeeh yeah kinda, it depends where you are. in NY black is standard you won't stand out for wearing black. black is classy and elegant (hence formal wear) but it's mainly an east coast thing. in other parts of the country it is considered more formal. if your worried about i would go with dark blue.

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