Law School Discussion

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Messages - livinglegend

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 35
1
Great post. The Tuition rates are an issue, but as a member of the younger generation I cannot tell you how frustrated with the sense of entitlement and lack of personal responsibility I see. Even these tuition rates they are high, but nobody forces you to go to law school or pursue higher education .

Maybe Monterey can be one of the schools that shows some of the issues with the tuition rates and creates young lawyers willing to take personal responsibility for themselves and succeed in the legal profession by going good lawyers.

That is the other thing to finish my rant all these unemployed grads say it is not fair, but never seem to be able to indicate they will be good lawyers or good in whatever field they are pursuing. You have to bring something to the table if you want to get hired.

2
Where should I go next fall? / Re: South Florida law schools
« on: February 12, 2014, 10:46:24 AM »
That is great news! However, one thing to look at with law school scholarships are the conditions. Usually a merit scholarship will be contingent on maintaing a certain GPA or class rank. i.e the scholarship will be 16,000 per year contingent on a 3.0 GPA the first year is guaranteed money, but if she falls below a 3.0 the scholarship is lost for 2l and 3l.

Maintaining a 3.0 sounds easy since anyone attending an ABA law school achieved that quite easily in undergrad. However, law school is different it is full of smart, hard working, motivated people and the way most schools work is that only 35% of first year students can achieve a 3.0, which means there is 65% chance the incoming student will not keep their scholarship year two and three.

Each school is slightly different, but really read the conditions on the scholarship. If they sound burdensome negotiate for better ones and also don't be afraid to ask for scholarship money from Miami.

Your daughter has good options and should be proud of her accomplishments, but many people don't understand the scholarship system so I like to inform incoming law students.

3
Frankly no matter what Industry you get into starting out will be tough. The reality is that anything worth having is a struggle and if you want to be a lawyer then go to law school. There are number of jobs for lawyers, but you have to go and get them the law is a tough profession and nothing will be handed to you.

As to your question often times in more rural areas legal work is easier to find as there is less competition. People at Harvard, Yale, Stanford etc are not likely to strive to work in Scranton nor are experienced attorneys typically looking to move to Scranton. The more rural you go the less lawyers will be around.

If you want to be a lawyer and have realistic expectations it can be a great career, I love it!

Good luck with whatever you decide and feel free to continue using this board.

4
Frankly no matter what Industry you get into starting out will be tough. The reality is that anything worth having is a struggle and if you want to be a lawyer then go to law school. There are number of jobs for lawyers, but you have to go and get them the law is a tough profession and nothing will be handed to you.

As to your question often times in more rural areas legal work is easier to find as there is less competition. People at Harvard, Yale, Stanford etc are not likely to strive to work in Scranton nor are experienced attorneys typically looking to move to Scranton. The more rural you go the less lawyers will be around.

If you want to be a lawyer and have realistic expectations it can be a great career, I love it!

Good luck with whatever you decide and feel free to continue using this board.

5
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: July 2013 Bar Exam Results
« on: January 28, 2014, 10:37:16 AM »
Granted Cooleys Michigan pass rate is on par with other Michigan ABA schools. Most schools pass rates drop substantially when their students take bars in other states. A lot of it is probably the stress of students simply adjusting to a new environment.

I will also add that I honestly believe whether someone passes the bar or not has more to do with the individual than the school they attend. Whether you went to Harvard or Cooley if you don't put the long hours of studying and practice exams in it is unlikely to go well and whether puts those hours in or chooses to Party, procrastinated or whatever else is up to them.

6
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: Practice of "Law" w/out a License
« on: January 17, 2014, 10:41:11 AM »
YOu can also represent yourself and defend yourself against bill collectors etc much more effectively with some legal training.

While in law school I was able to get out of tickets, b.s medical bills etc, probably saved 10k.

7
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Please help make law school decision
« on: January 17, 2014, 10:37:27 AM »
Glad to  hear it helped I know how scary being a OL can be, but if you use common sense, which most 0ls myself included when I was one often fail to use.

8
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: taft law school
« on: January 16, 2014, 10:43:40 AM »
Very good post by the Taft student. The reality is at an ABA law school you are mainly self taught as well and there is no homework or personal feedback.

Upon graduation you may be able to obtain a public defender position in some of the smaller Califirnia Counties and maybe DA in a rural California county such as Siskiyous to gain experience.

Good luck on the exam and stay positive

9
As usual maintain offers some great advice and I would like to add onto it, but please remember anyone writing on this board or others myself included are nothing more than anonymous Internet posters so take any advice received on this site or others with a grain of salt.

With that said there are really two things to consider should you retake the LSAT and is law school with your current family dynamic realistic.

With a 2.82 and 155 you can get into some NY schools Touro, CUNY, Pace, maybe Albany if your in Upstate NYmaybe a Jersey school like Seton Hall could work if your in Manhattan. You are unlikely to get scholarship money though. If you retake and improve to 160-165 some scholarship money could come, but a 2.82 will limit you. It is also possible you won't improve, but only you know if you were able to give the LSAT everything you could when you got a 155.

Your family situation is a red flag and I usually think part time school is a bad idea, it works for some, but many part timers fail out and lose 50k in tuition. That is just part timers with no family obligations your situation sounds even more difficult. You can do it, but it may not work out well and I really think if law school is what you want go all in and become a full time student, because law school is intense and a joke compared to the bar exam, which you will eventually have to take.

If you are going to attend then I think a better option than St. Johns would be CUNY because it is about 20,000 a year cheaper or 60,000 cheaper over three years. You will also get the same for your money the reality is any ABA law school will teach you the same thing the law is the law and the supreme court cases you read do not change if you attend St. Johns or CUNY.

It is a very difficult whether to attend law school and where so I do recommend you visit the NY schools your interested in talk to professors, students, admins etc and see what your gut says after the visit. You know better than anybody else what works for you.

The law can be a great career for the right person and miserable for the wrong one. Go into law school with your eyes open and realistic expectations. I wish you the best whatever you decide

10
As usual maintain offers some great advice and I would like to add onto it, but please remember anyone writing on this board or others myself included are nothing more than anonymous Internet posters so take any advice received on this site or others with a grain of salt.

With that said there are really two things to consider should you retake the LSAT and is law school with your current family dynamic realistic.

With a 2.82 and 155 you can get into some NY schools Touro, CUNY, Pace, maybe Albany if your in Upstate NYmaybe a Jersey school like Seton Hall could work if your in Manhattan. You are unlikely to get scholarship money though. If you retake and improve to 160-165 some scholarship money could come, but a 2.82 will limit you. It is also possible you won't improve, but only you know if you were able to give the LSAT everything you could when you got a 155.

Your family situation is a red flag and I usually think part time school is a bad idea, it works for some, but many part timers fail out and lose 50k in tuition. That is just part timers with no family obligations your situation sounds even more difficult. You can do it, but it may not work out well and I really think if law school is what you want go all in and become a full time student, because law school is intense and a joke compared to the bar exam, which you will eventually have to take.

If you are going to attend then I think a better option than St. Johns would be CUNY because it is about 20,000 a year cheaper or 60,000 cheaper over three years. You will also get the same for your money the reality is any ABA law school will teach you the same thing the law is the law and the supreme court cases you read do not change if you attend St. Johns or CUNY.

It is a very difficult whether to attend law school and where so I do recommend you visit the NY schools your interested in talk to professors, students, admins etc and see what your gut says after the visit. You know better than anybody else what works for you.

The law can be a great career for the right person and miserable for the wrong one. Go into law school with your eyes open and realistic expectations. I wish you the best whatever you decide

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