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Messages - avarist

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11
Minority Topics / Re: Should North African Arabs be considered URMs?
« on: October 15, 2012, 04:21:38 PM »
Many URMs may not be "decendants of slaves" (not of any importance one way or another)
And it's not meant to "make-up" for slavery or anything else.-Just to reflect that they are under represented.
Afterall if it were meant to mean that, then why would a fresh immigrant from Africa who is black be treated 100% the same as the decendant of a slave? Answer: It obviously has no impact in any way whatsoever.

You can't separate underepresentation from past discrimination, the two are not mutually exclusive. When affirmative action programs gained steam in the late 60's and early 70's the entire idea was to make up for past discrimination. There was a recognition that African Americans' underepresentation in higher education was directly tied to historical prejudices. (Check out the background info in Bakke.)

The idea of affirmative action as a means to promote "diversity" (that is, actively seeking to admit underepresented minorities regardless of past discrimination) is relatively new, and didn't get fully recognized until Grutter (2003). 

The OPs question was why aren't North Africans considered "African American" for the purposes of law school admission? That's the specific question I was addressing. The answer is because "African American" has a specific meaning; it describes black Americans of African descent. Those Americans were denied access to education for hundreds of years, which resulted in underepresentation. That is why the term "African American" does not simply describe any person from the African continent who now lives in America.

You need to get a reality check. It may have started for those reasons, but Obama is an "African-American" and none of his Family were ever slaves (although some may have owned some)
Just because Arabs are not considered African-American, any black Kenyan fresh off the boat is. Hope that simplified it for you. If not, too bad I guess. It's still true. (no one in their right might would ever ask you to "prove" you had slave relatives, find one example anywhere if you want to prove me wrong)

Oh, and just in case you havn't learned this yet "background info" (and even "dicta" written by the judge and attached to the case itself) is not law.

12
Minority Topics / Re: Should North African Arabs be considered URMs?
« on: October 12, 2012, 01:20:18 PM »
People seem to forget that one of the main goals of taking URM status into account is to attempt to "make up" for past discrimination. It is possible that a newly arrived immigrant from North Africa may experience discrimination, but it is the effect of multiple centuries of officially sanctioned discrimination suffered by African Americans that affirmative action programs have tried to alleviate.

African Americans, ie; the descendents of slaves, have been subject to particularized forms of discrimination that are not necessarily experienced by modern immmigrants who arrive in the U.S. voluntarily. It would therefore not seem to make sense to extend beneficial URM status to individuals who have not been confronted with same historical hurdles.

The other key aspect of URM status is the "underepresented" facet. Not all minorities are underepresented in higher education.

The last setence is the only part of that which matters. Many URMs may not be "decendants of slaves" (not of any importance one way or another)
And it's not meant to "make-up" for slavery or anything else.-Just to reflect that they are under represented.
Afterall if it were meant to mean that, then why would a fresh immigrant from Africa who is black be treated 100% the same as the decendant of a slave? Answer: It obviously has no impact in any way whatsoever.

13
As an ABA law student, I can tell you, thats nothing bro.

Most LawSchools require you to buy hundred of dollars of books written by the Schools Profs each tem to supplement the class books. (and often barely even use it)

It's kind of just par for the course.

14
Minority Topics / Re: Should North African Arabs be considered URMs?
« on: October 11, 2012, 09:26:35 PM »
It is vey sad that such a situation exists where a few people are granted the URM status but a selected few are not. The topic if discussed will lead to religious arguments. It would be better if the current URM status is not allowed to African Americans or if it is granted to all Africans. Peace. Check her for details of my work.
How is it "sad"? You either are a URM or you are not.
Seems pretty open/shut.

15
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: Help me pick an online law school
« on: October 11, 2012, 09:24:49 PM »
My friend is attending a DL school.  He attends classes live which may not be for everyone from a time commitment.  You may want consider that in your analysis.
How so?

16
Affirmative Action / The End of Affirmative Action?
« on: October 09, 2012, 10:26:35 PM »
http://news.yahoo.com/supreme-court-hear-case-brought-white-student-claims-112510107.html

Supporters of affirmative action fear that the Supreme Court could curtail or further restrict the use of race-conscious admissions policies at public universities.

On Wednesday, all eyes will be on Justice Anthony Kennedy, whose vote is considered pivotal in the case brought by a white Texan who has sued the University of Texas at Austin, claiming that she was denied admission to the school in 2008 because of her race. Abigail Fisher, who has since graduated from Louisiana State University, said she was subject to unequal treatment in violation of the 14th Amendment.

"I was taught from the time I was a little girl that any kind of discrimination was wrong, and for an institution of higher learning to act this way makes no sense to me," Fisher said in an interview clip posted on the website of the Project on Fair Representation, a legal defense foundation that's providing her with legal representation.

On the other side are lawyers for the University of Texas, who argue that, like many other universities, UT seeks to assemble a class that is diverse in innumerable ways -- including race -- and that "race is just one of many characteristics that form the mosaic presented by an applicant's file."

More than 90 friend of the court briefs have been filed in the case, with the Obama administration weighing in favor of the university. Others, who support Fisher, argue that diversity can be achieved through race-neutral programs, and that race-preferential admissions policies can do more harm than good.


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Distance Education Law Schools / Re: Help me pick an online law school
« on: October 09, 2012, 10:23:03 PM »
when do you plan to sit the fybx? Taken any pre-tests for it yet?

18
caveat: Get patents if possible, otherwise any published theory can be build upon by others to make working models and get patents (presuming of course the PhD is on an actual patentable thing and not just some junk polysci thesis/dissertation).

Seems pretty open and shut dosn't it?

what numbnuts.  julie hardly know where start.



then do the world a favor and don't.  :P

19
Law School Applications / Re: To disclose or not?
« on: October 08, 2012, 04:55:36 PM »
LSDAS policy is to disclose ALL courses taken for attempted college credit, even if not going for a degree. (so disclose)

As for the expunged record, each school may vary. But if they ask (as they often do) for ALL arrests, even those not leading to conviction, or those expunged, then obey the instructions given.  -If by some fluke they only ask for actual convictions on record, then only give what they ask.



20
I'm pretty sure the physical requirments for direct commission officers is a LOT lower than enlisted marines.

I saw Chaplains who didn't looked like whales. They had rank on their shoulders and were active duty.

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