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Messages - Jeffort

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21
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« on: February 14, 2012, 01:54:04 PM »
I'm a 2010 law school grad and currently a lawyer.  I would advise you major in something more useful like business/Economics or science or engineering.  This will give you an edge on the job market after law school ... The job market for lawyers is currently dismal.  I'm a very optimistic person, and even I can admit that.  It doesn't look like its getting better, so you shouldn't count on that (but it would be awesome if things improved!)   Also, if you have an engineering or hard science background, you can do patent law / ip which is in higher demand.

I'd recommend minoring in English or philosophy (or just taking courses) to get the edge for writing / reading and the LSAT.  Also, a foreign language, especially Chinese could be helpful.


Oh and also... Make sure it's your dream to be a lawyer and not a law student.  While I enjoyed law school, 3 years is fleeting, and then you have to be a lawyer ... Which is often really different than what ppl think it is.  Also, do research on the law school scam and the state of the legal economy so you know what you're getting into.  And know that document review jobs are what new lawyers today are fighting for in ost places, as sad as that may seem.



I pretty much agree with almost all of it since it's good realistic advice that matches up with the current state of affairs.

The part I must caution about is choosing a hard science major such as engineering, chemistry, biology bio-tech, etc. if one is not really interested in the field and willing to put in a lot of hard work in the associated classes. 

The classes are tough and very demanding.  They will rip apart your GPA and sink your brain as fast as Seal Team Six pulled Osama Bin Ladens brain out the back of his head and sank him in the ocean if you are not interested in the classes and consequently don't do the homework because you hate the classes/subjects and homework load involved.

If you are into hard sciences/engineering/bio-tech/etc., it is a great way to set a path to become a patent lawyer or a lawyer that deals with patent and science issues related litigation.  There is still a steady demand for lawyers of that type that are armed with specialized knowledge.

Also, don't do a drama major or some other similar --free/easy A's for everyone-- not very academic/very little reading involved major of the type that are meant for people who want to be actors/artists/musicians/famous entertainers/etc.  Law school admission committees at good schools will likely just laugh a bit when they read the application and then put it in the denied stack unless you have a top notch LSAT score, GPA and compelling soft factors that show you can and will be a book worm that is cool with spending a lot of time reading and writing.


22
Studying for the LSAT / Re: LSAC GPA Q
« on: January 08, 2012, 07:46:53 AM »
They probably will be factored in since they were college classes and LSAC requires that you submit transcripts from every college you have taken classes at, but I'm not sure with your situation since you were in high school at the time you took them and it's not clear from your post whether they were college courses or just satellite high school classes held on a college campus. 

If you were issued a transcript from the college for the classes you must submit it and the grades will be factored in.

The best way to get a definitive answer is to call LSAC and/or email them about it to see what they have to say.  LSAC staff is helpful with answering questions about the law school application and admission process. 

Don't be afraid to call them and tell them the details or email them with the details and questions, they don't bite.

 


23
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Sincere Inquiry from a Starter
« on: January 04, 2012, 03:30:13 AM »
Certainly do not start working LSAT materials for a few years.  Your main academic priority should be earning and maintaining a high GPA.

For law school admissions your undergraduate major does not really matter unless it is something really easy and non-academic along the lines of arts and crafts, horticulture, pottery, etc., but your GPA does matter a lot.  Do not select your UG major and classes based on what you think law school admission committees might favor. They seek to put together classes of people from diverse backgrounds that have performed well in prior academic settings.

Pick a major that you are interested in.  You should explore the options to find the one that is the best fit for you.

Regarding specific undergraduate classes that may help you be better prepared for the LSAT several years from now when you take it, basic statistics classes and basic logic/philosophy (NOT symbolic logic!) classes would help.  Those classes teach the fundamentals of valid methods of logical and analytical reasoning and the many common flawed methods of reasoning that are the bread and butter of what many LSAT questions (especially in the LR sections) revolve around. 

LSAT questions are designed to test reasoning skills/abilities with fairly basic logical concepts as well as English reading comprehension/grammar/vocabulary skills. 


24
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Easily confused topics/words
« on: December 18, 2011, 10:43:21 AM »
oh my.

Julie, I know you could have come up with something better and that rhymes in this thread than another "oh my". I'm disappointed. 

PS:  Site owner Andrew Sinclair did something to the board that ate the avatars of many older user accounts.  You, IrrX and other LSD long time regulars need to re-upload your avatars.

oh my.



PS: Glad to see that the avatars are back.



25
nothing wrong with knowing how get test-ready, whenever that happen.

True, but there is something wrong when an LSAT clueless person claims to be an expert prep service provider in attempts to get naive students to hand over credit card information in order to take their money.

IrrX cleaned out this spammer/scammer so the problem here is solved for now. 

26
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Easily confused topics/words
« on: December 14, 2011, 04:11:28 PM »
oh my.

Julie, I know you could have come up with something better and that rhymes in this thread than another "oh my". I'm disappointed. 

PS:  Site owner Andrew Sinclair did something to the board that ate the avatars of many older user accounts.  You, IrrX and other LSD long time regulars need to re-upload your avatars. 


27
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Easily confused topics/words
« on: December 13, 2011, 07:57:47 AM »
oh my.

Have to give him a little credit though, he deleted his foolish spam post in this thread.  Hopefully he'll change his username to something other than 'Win'


28
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Some funnies for finals week
« on: December 10, 2011, 05:48:27 AM »
LMAO

All 16 of those are epic funny!  :D :D

29
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Easily confused topics/words
« on: December 09, 2011, 03:10:21 PM »
Hi gottajiboo,

Although there are too many variations of words to give you a list, you bring up a good point: a lot of points can be had or missed on the LSAT by just being sensitive to words.

Before you mark your right answer, make sure its scope and direction matches the question's and passages'.

Best of luck.

Let us know how it goes.

Are you sure you are qualified to be an LSAT teacher or tutor?  This is another duh obvious -this dude has no clue about what he is talking about concerning the LSAT- post from you.  It demonstrates major reading comprehension failure and lack of simple knowledge about basics of the LSAT including ignorance of the ground level basics regarding dates when it is administered.

The user you responded to was scheduled to take the October 2011 LSAT two days after posting this thread.  The US/Canada regions December 2011 LSAT was administered last weekend December 3rd and Monday December 5th for Saturday sabbath observers.  The saying "A day late and a dollar short" is far to generous to describe you. 

Please learn something about the LSAT before continuing to try to sell tutoring/preparation services to students. 
You should start here:  http://www.lsac.org/JD/LSAT/about-the-LSAT.asp



 

30
Waking up your brain takes more than waking up early.

Plan for how you will have LSAT energy when you need it.

Yes, waking-up early may be a part of it, but so is going to sleep early, eating right, exercising, etc., etc.

Your LSAT score reflects how you get your brain ready, so make sure on test-day it is as crisp, clear, and as powerful as possible.

Hey supposed LSAT tutor and junkie Win, you are a little late trying to help this student.  The test the student was getting ready for was administered last Saturday.



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