Law School Discussion

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Messages - Maintain FL 350

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11
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: Question about LSAC transcript summarization
« on: March 11, 2015, 12:07:07 PM »
Typically, LSAC will count all college level courses attempted. If I'm reading your post correctly, it sounds like your community college courses do not fall within the exemption since the transcript lists both the grade and units attempted.

Your best bet is to call LSAC. They can give you more precise information.

12
It's difficult to say because nobody on this board works for your school or knows what their particular definition of "serious hardship" means.

But, just looking at the situation you've described I would think that it certainly qualifies. I'm not familiar with the 3rd year visiting thing. Does that just mean that you take your last year of classes somewhere else?

Ask your school what they require, and apply. That's all you can really do. They'll be able to give you better info than anyone here.

One thing to consider might be taking a little time off from law school. I know you said you're doing well academically, but maybe you could use a break? After graduation you'll need to prep for the bar, which can be quite stressful. It might be a good idea to sort out any problems now, before that whole process begins.

13
If you have no interest I taking the bar, then I would probably look for the most affordable distance program with a decent track record.

Even though you don't plan on taking the bar, I would still look into each school's bar pass rate. Why? Because some distance learning programs have never produced a single lawyer and others have pass rates in the 5-10% range. I think this probably says something about the program and your fellow students.

You want to get a good education. Look for schools with at least consistent pass rates, even if they're relatively low (compared to ABA programs). Some schools that come to mind are Taft, Oakbrook, and St. Francis. (St. Francis is new, but their program seems a little more selective than average).

14
General Board / Re: In Need of Serious Help!
« on: February 26, 2015, 12:00:22 PM »
As long as you weren't on academic probation or expelled or anything like that, you'll probably be fine. The bar is mostly concerned with people attempting to hide disciplinary actions or bad grades. A mistake like this will probably require an explanation and may slow down the moral character process, but you should probably be ok.

As Citylaw said, when in doubt disclose. It is imperative that you be 100% honest with the bar and your law school. If there is a discrepancy in your records, the bar will likely find it. It's much better that they hear it from you first. In these situations, an attempt to cover up is often worse than the infraction itself.   

15
General Board / Re: Transferring T4 to T1 w/ top %3
« on: February 18, 2015, 11:47:12 AM »
I somewhat disagree. The chances of transferring to Penn or Georgetown are pretty low, but Villanova/Temple etc seems realistic. Top 3% is very good, and neither of those schools are incredibly competitive in the first place. I know people who made similar transfers from So Cal T4s to Loyola, and they weren't even top 3%. More like top 10%.

I think the bigger issue is whether you have reason to believe that transferring is worth it. You could graduate near the top of your class from Widener, or (probably) middle of the pack from Temple. I'm not sure that a average student from Temple or Villanova is necessarily better off than a high ranked graduate from Widener. The schools you mentioned (with the exceptions of Penn and Georgetown) are not elite. Are their employment prospects really that much greater than Widener? I dunno, but I'd look into it. Personally, I wouldn't make a decision like this based on rankings alone.

Another option is that you may be able to leverage your ranking into greater scholarship aid. Graduating higher ranked and with little debt from Widener may be more advantageous in the long run than mid ranked (this happens to many transfers) and in debt from another school. Something to consider.

16
Sounds like you should contact LSAC and ask them directly.

Every school that I applied to required one application for the school, and then you also had to send in the LSAC report. Is that maybe what this school is requiring, that you submit the school's own application by June, but the LSAC report can follow?

That said, all the applications I submitted still required an LSAT score which was merely confirmed by the LSAC report later. Again, I'd call LSAC and maybe ask the law school for a deadline waiver if necessary.

17
Law School Applications / Re: Very Confused, Interesting Scenerio
« on: February 09, 2015, 11:45:49 AM »
I don't think the withdrawals themselves will make much (if any) difference, but the time you spent at community college may lower your LSAC GPA a little. LSAC adjusts your GPA according to different factors, and because community college is considered "easier" than a university, it may affect your GPA. Even if it does, the effect would not be too great.

Forcible Hospitalization

I'm not 100% sure, but you may be required to report this to the state bar when you submit the Character & Fitness application. Assuming that the problem is taken care of and you don't have ongoing episodes of hospitalization, it probably won't be a problem. Nonetheless, you'll likely have to fully disclose and explain the situation. Lots of people are admitted to the bar who have mental health issues, but they want to make sure that the problem isn't going to adversely affect your future clients. Call the state bar and check with them first.

LSAT

Do you mean that you actually have a 176, or you are just hopeful? If you don't have an actual LSAT score everything is speculative. Honestly, you really can't assume you'll score 176.

Study hard, take a prep course, and get a real score on the board. Until then, it's all pure speculation.

18
General Off-Topic Board / Mods, please help?!
« on: January 31, 2015, 11:32:08 AM »
Mods,

Is there any way to stop the invasion? This site is being completely overrun.

19
General Board / Re: How Serious Is My Situation?
« on: January 28, 2015, 12:06:43 PM »
I have a D average (1.4), but only because I had difficulty focusing on studying and exam taking.

A couple of points to address:

First, developing effective study and exam taking skills are absolutely crucial to law schools success. I'm not trying to be overly harsh, but when you say "only because I had difficulty" etc etc, it makes me think you're underestimating the problem.

You need to figure out what the obstacle is (anxiety, time pressure, distractions?) and come up with a plan to overcome it. Your law school probably has academic support programs. Look into them, they can be very helpful.

Until you get this figured out there isn't much point in worrying about internships or employment. You need to get a handle on this before the next round of exams and definitely before the bar exam.

Will I be able to get past this semester for internships and employment, if I do well?

This is tougher to answer because it depends on what you mean by "good employment" as well as your personal skills (networking ability, interpersonal skills, etc). If you're talking about big firms, prestigious federal positions and judicial clerkships, then yes, it's going to be a problem. Those jobs are very competitive. If you're talking about small firms, maybe local government offices, then it will be less of an issue as long as it is only one semester of low grades.

As far as post grad employment, one semester of low grades is not going to prevent you from getting a job. However, consistently low grades can be a problem.

As Citylaw said, lots of people stumble during their first semester. I know people who were disappointed with their first year grades and who went on to graduate and are now practicing lawyers. The factor they all had in common was that they went into overdrive to figure out and fix the problem .

Good Luck in your studies!

20
Yes, I think there was  post on the boards a few months ago about MASL closing down.

I'm not sure what the cheapest online law school is, but it probably depends on whether or not the student wants to take the bar. There are some non-bar qualifying degrees out there that are very cheap, but there's not much point unless you just want it for self enrichment.

As far as bar-qualifying degrees, I think that the California correspondence schools are much cheaper than Concord.

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