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Messages - artsci10

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1
Thomas M. Cooley / Re: Is it worth it?
« on: February 10, 2012, 11:14:15 AM »
And clown college.

2
Thomas M. Cooley / Re: Is it worth it?
« on: February 08, 2012, 12:53:19 AM »
Let me make this as clear as I can. If your goal is to become a successful and employed lawyer:

HYS > T14 > T20 > T1 > T2 > T3 >T4 > secretary school > barber college > clown college > Devry > online unaccredited law school > watching Law & Order reruns > driver's ed > Subway sandwich artist school > Cooley

3
Thomas M. Cooley / Re: Is it worth it?
« on: February 05, 2012, 01:04:41 AM »
If you want $100k in student debt and a job as a secretary (but with a JD) go to Cooley. Othewise, wait. It's THE bottom of the barrel of American law schools and unless you have a ready-made job set up through your own personal/family connections, you have basically no job of working in a law firm after graduation.

4
Oh Canada! / Re: Why? Dear God Why?
« on: January 23, 2012, 07:01:00 PM »
Lower cost of education in Canada a result of two simple factors:
1) De facto absence of for-profit universities. There are a couple out west, but its seen as a mark against you if you have a degree from a private university in Canada. Every major Canadian University, including all the ones that have law schools are public.
2) Government funding. Not as big of a factor in law school, but undergrad in Canada is subsidized over 60% by the federal and provincial governments. As a result, tuition at Canada's best school is as low as $5,000/year in BA  or BSc programs (a bit higher in business or engineering).

Canadian view access to education with a different mindset than Americans. There's a mentality of 'if you get the grades, you get to go' and government-funded grants and zero-interest loans make higher education a reality for anyone who deserves it.

5
Oh Canada! / Re: Is an ABA JD enough to practice in Canada?
« on: January 23, 2012, 06:56:25 PM »
Quebec is a nation, but one that exists within the Canadian state. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qu%C3%A9b%C3%A9cois_nation_motion

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Oh Canada! / Re: 3.92/160 Chances?
« on: January 20, 2012, 12:27:23 PM »
With your GPA you can probably get in almost everywhere besides U of T. And apply to U of T anyway, because your GPA is awesome and who knows. Plenty of people with LSATs lower than yours get in to U of T with 163s and 164s so it's worth a shot.

7
Oh Canada! / Re: 2.76/166/172 - Canadian Law Schools?
« on: January 20, 2012, 12:25:40 PM »
You have absolutely zero chance at U of T - they won't take anyone with less than an A- average. You have a great LSAT and most Canadian schools only look at highest score, but that GPA is a killer. I'd rule out Western, Ottawa, Queen's and Osgoode most likely on account of that.

You should apply to Windsor, New Brunswick, Calgary, Manitoba, and Thomson River. Throw an application to Western and Queen's because you never no, but I doubt you'll get in.

What's your Last 2 years GPA? That makes a big difference, especially in the western provinces.

8
Oh Canada! / Re: Why? Dear God Why?
« on: January 20, 2012, 12:22:25 PM »
You asked why: there are basically two categories of Canadians who do law school in the states:

1) Top-tier - Some students may go to T14 schools thinking it will help there prospects in Canada. This isn't necessarily the case; they still have to go through the NCA process, but many of them do so nonetheless.

2) Back door - Admissions standards are significantly lower in the US than they are in Canada. This isn't to say that the US doesn't have plenty of fine and elite law schools that are hard to get into, but Canada simply does not have anything like 4th-tier schools where just about anyone with an undergrad degree can go. Even the lowest ranked Canadian law schools require about a 160 LSAT and a minimum of 3.4 or so GPA. Plenty of Canadians who can't get into our schools will go down south for a back door into the Canadian law scene. This usually backfires because it's difficult to practice in Canada with a US degree (you need to go through the NCA process which requires extra courses and exams, and is time consuming and expensive) and because it's really frowned upon in the Canadian legal community, so unless your Daddy is a partner on Bay Street, you're pretty much out of luck.

Also worth noting, Canadian law schools cost $10k-15k per year (except Osgoode and U of T, the most elite schools, who charge around $20k per year) so Canadians who go south pay for it big time.

9
Oh Canada! / Re: Is an ABA JD enough to practice in Canada?
« on: January 20, 2012, 12:15:26 PM »
Yes, anyone with a foreign degree who wishes to practice law outside of Quebec must go through the NCA process wherein your credentials are evaluated, and based on your marks, professional experiences, and course selection in law school you have to take a certain number (it changes significantly from applicant to application) of NCA exams and courses. For example, practically every US law graduate would be required to take Canadian Constitutional Law.

Following completion of the NCA process, one still needs to article in order to be called to the bar, though depending on the province this may be waived if you have 5+ years of experience as a lawyer in your home country.

In Quebec the process is completely different. I'm not sure there even is an accreditation program for Quebec, but if there is, it would require you to learn a completely new legal system (Quebec uses Civil Law instead of Common Law) and knowing La Belle Province, I'm nearly certain that you'd have to be fluent in French to even apply.

Hope this helps.

10
Oh Canada! / Re: Requirments to be a lawyer in Canada
« on: January 20, 2012, 12:14:08 PM »
ABA is basically meaningless in Canada (the "A" stands for American, after all). Canada has only about 2 dozen law schools and they're run with strict control by the Law Societies (equivalent to Bar Associations) and provincial governments. Canadians view legal education quite differently than Americans - there are no private law schools or bottom-tier schools where no one can get a job - and even the lowest ranked law schools in Canada require about a 160+ and 3.4+ for admissions.

Yes, anyone with a foreign degree who wishes to practice law outside of Quebec must go through the NCA process wherein your credentials are evaluated, and based on your marks, professional experiences, and course selection in law school you have to take a certain number (it changes significantly from applicant to application) of NCA exams and courses. For example, practically every US law graduate would be required to take Canadian Constitutional Law.

Following completion of the NCA process, one still needs to article in order to be called to the bar, though depending on the province this may be waived if you have 5+ years of experience as a lawyer in your home country.

In Quebec the process is completely different. I'm not sure there even is an accreditation program for Quebec, but if there is, it would require you to learn a completely new legal system (Quebec uses Civil Law instead of Common Law) and knowing La Belle Province, I'm nearly certain that you'd have to be fluent in French to even apply.

Hope this helps.

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