Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - Jets

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 ... 192
11
Transferring / Re: Transfer to Penn from t14
« on: January 30, 2009, 02:48:57 PM »
I am from Philadelphia and I am currently not happy where I am at (T14). The median is 3.3 and right now my GPA is above a 3.5. I plan to work in Philly following graduation and love to go to school there. Does  anyone have a educated guess of my chances? I know lateral transfers with personal connections are supposed to be easier.

Thanks for any help

You'll almost certainly get in.

12
General Board / Re: Splitting 1L Summer
« on: January 30, 2009, 08:07:29 AM »
Do firms generally allow 1Ls to split summers?

Also, what is the normal amount of time you are given to accept/decline an offer?

I did this, got an offer to return (my firm didn't allow permanent offers for 1Ls).

13
Transferring / Re: Transfering from USC to GULC
« on: January 18, 2009, 09:13:50 PM »
Hi, I just received my first semester grades from USC and I have an A in torts (2nd highest grade in section), A+ in civ pro (highest grade in section), A- in contracts, A in legal writing (highest grade)... They haven't released the law, language and ethics grade yet (course unique to USC i believe) but I am pretty sure I did well.

I know that GULC has an early action program where you can transfer based on 1st semester grades and I was wondering whether it would be worth transferring.

The largest pro is that it would be a safety move in case I dont do as well in the second semester and my chances of transfer get diminished...

I would like to practice in a large law firm setting in the LA area after graduation, and would transfer to Georgetown simply because i have better BigLaw opportunities at Gtown (particularly given this downhill economy)...would appreciate the advice. 





I was similarly situated after the first semester of my 1L year. I applied early to GULC out of "fear" of a grade drop so I'd be able to go to a better school if things went south. Sounds logical at first blush, but it simply doesn't work. You almost certainly will not have your second semester grades back by the time you have to deposit upwards of $750 at GULC. It's not worth it. Particularly given that, in all likelihood, your grades will be about the same when all's said and done.

Good luck.

14
Transferring / Re: middle of the class at Cornell to... ?
« on: January 12, 2009, 09:18:40 PM »
jets:

thanks. does your comment include lateral xfers?


Yes and no. I think you MAY be able to pull off a lateral transfer at the median if you have good reasons to transfer to the school, but the odds are somewhat against you because the lateral schools will be more inclined to take the guy who was top of his class at a Tier 2.

But I said what I said because median at Cornell gets you a lateral school at best, and a worse school at worst; so I don't think it's worth it either way.

Cornell's a fine school; why would you want to transfer?

15
Transferring / Re: middle of the class at Cornell to... ?
« on: January 12, 2009, 07:55:14 PM »
i went to a good undergrad school with a passable GPA and got a 169 lsat.

what are my options?

thanks.

If you're talking about transferring, the answer is you can't transfer anywhere worth transferring to.

16
General Board / Re: Should I do Mock Trial?
« on: January 12, 2009, 01:27:58 AM »
I don't see the point much... just a ton of extra work.

Is it worth the pain?  It seems "everyone is doing it".

Do it. It's fun, and believe me--it's hardly any work. I did barely anything, and made the board for it.

Since you went to GW -- what about the ADR board?

Naw, not that one. I competed, but was not a skillful negotiator. But I did make moot court, too--and that was a ton of fun.

17
General Board / Re: Should I do Mock Trial?
« on: January 12, 2009, 12:51:15 AM »
I don't see the point much... just a ton of extra work.

Is it worth the pain?  It seems "everyone is doing it".

Do it. It's fun, and believe me--it's hardly any work. I did barely anything, and made the board for it.

18
My opinion: No, it cannot be learned but the skills required can be manufactured.

What do I mean? I'm referring to making canned answers--something I've discussed in previous posts at length and won't go into detail for the time being. If you follow my strategy meticulously, and it will take you a ton of time throughout the semester and well into finals, you won't run into the problems you detail at length in your original post.

Specifically, you (likely) won't be bogged down in senseless claims because you'll know the law better (from writing your own personal "treatises" keyed to your professor) and will be able to dispense with them sooner. Law school exams are not a forum for creativity, and you won't feel the need to distinguish yourself in that manner when your use of this method will provide an independent and impressive way to do so--if you do it right, you'll be one of the few people in your class using string cites with signals, etc.

Further, even if you do waste time discussing nonsense, you'll have time for it if you can type fast. This method essentially allows you to type detailed (pre-prepared) articulations of the rule before jumping into your analysis. Since you won't have to reinvent the wheel in stating the rule, you'll really only need to "write" the issue/analysis/conclusion section from the IRAC paradigm. And while you type your rule into your exam, you'll think of new points you'd perhaps missed initially. In my experience with this method, I managed to get an A+ on a three hour exam after losing 30 minutes at the beginning due to computer malfunction. I was so freaked out that I couldn't read the questions, write or think until my computer was fixed by the tech; so I sat there, waited for it to be repaired, and was able to finish an exam most of my peers couldn't complete EARLY (and with the top grade) simply because I had my rule sheet handy.

I'm happy to help more if you or others have further questions.

19
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: How Do You Read LR Articles?
« on: January 11, 2009, 11:17:26 AM »
I've been reading Levmore's scholarship, particularly his essay in "Torts Stories" about Wagon Mound and foreseeability/causation analysis, and I think I've been reading all wrong all these years.  Suddenly, it hit me: I was reading it like it was a book, rather than trying to find the thesis and meat of the analysis before constructing the essay around it.

So how do you read LR articles?  Do you go for the gold?  Read it like a book?  Make a cup of coffee and peruse the footnotes for six hours before jumping into the main text?

Perhaps I might ask: how *should* you read LR articles?


I really doubt you'll be as passionate about your legal studies by next month.


still happy about #4?   :P

No. I hate #4. Thanks for reminding me to change that.

20
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: How Do You Read LR Articles?
« on: January 11, 2009, 11:12:48 AM »
I've been reading Levmore's scholarship, particularly his essay in "Torts Stories" about Wagon Mound and foreseeability/causation analysis, and I think I've been reading all wrong all these years.  Suddenly, it hit me: I was reading it like it was a book, rather than trying to find the thesis and meat of the analysis before constructing the essay around it.

So how do you read LR articles?  Do you go for the gold?  Read it like a book?  Make a cup of coffee and peruse the footnotes for six hours before jumping into the main text?

Perhaps I might ask: how *should* you read LR articles?

I really doubt you'll be as passionate about your legal studies by next month.

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 ... 192