Law School Discussion

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Messages - YeShallBeGods

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41
General Board / Re: Business Cards?
« on: February 16, 2007, 08:16:59 AM »
Well, if you have a business card from a prior biz, I think that is more acceptable.  If you have a card which says law student, I still think that's looks like a "symbol of unearned power."

Wait... so you think it's better to pass out business cards for a company you no longer work for, rather than handing out cards that truthfully state your present situation....?

42
General Board / Re: okay, how many hours do you REALLY spend studying?
« on: February 15, 2007, 02:47:00 PM »
1.) what's your schools's rank? FT, PT, or night program?

Top 10, only full-time program.

2.) how many hours in class?

Approximately equal to number of credits, give or take an hour; something like sixteen hours.

3.) how many hours studying outside of class?

Four hours every weekday night, average of ten hours a day on the weekend. So forty hours a week average.

4.) what results did you achieve?  (grades/rank)

Top 20%

5.) any pearls of wisdom from hindsight?

-I may be in the minority, but I would have read through the Examples and Explanations guide to Civil Procedure the summer before I started. Civ Pro is one of the most tangible, rule based areas of the law and therefore the easiest to grasp just based upon undergrad experience. A lot of professors do closed book exams on the subject, so it's especially worthy of advance prep.

-Spend whatever it costs for exam writing tools. I did both LEEWS and Flemmings, as well as reading the famous books like Getting To Maybe. You're already spending thousands on this education, spend the extra grand on the exam writing guides.

-Outline from the getgo. I spent my exam periods working through exams, while most of my peers were still trying to compile their notes into a working form.

-Take more practice exams than you think you need to... Harvard and a few other schools have enormous databases of old exams. A lot of people merely look at and/or discuss the exams. FORCE yourself to write them out. It's the one and only thing I'm significantly changing this semester, as I intend to write out even more exams.

-Get to know your professors. Don't waste your time running up to them after class: go see them in their offices. Invite them out to lunch. Pay for lunches without asking, and don't be afraid to go out on one on one lunches. Some of my best moments of the whole semester were spent eating with just a professor.

-Help others out. Always provide notes for others, be upbeat as much as you can, and never boast about your acomplishments to your peers.

-Take time for yourself! Even though I spent sixty hours a week doing school work, I made it a priority to take time for the girlfriend, for my hobbies, and for my health. Again, while everyone was working hard during exam time, I spent a few hours chilling every night during the exam period because I had prepared so well all semester long.



Note: these answers are only based on first semester, still got to finish up this one, though things are the same thus far.

43
General Board / Re: Law Review write on is approaching....
« on: February 12, 2007, 02:43:40 PM »
every law review article ever written is an example of this style.  Look something up on Westlaw

Except that I imagine few published articles were capped at ten pages and written within forty-eight hours ;)

44
General Board / Law Review write on is approaching....
« on: February 12, 2007, 12:34:34 PM »
Any tips from veterans?  ;)

Like most schools, mine is a combination of grades and the write on competition. When it comes to the write-on, my biggest concern is what exactly I'm aiming to write. I know it's an analysis of the write-on package materials (consisting of opinions, articles, etc), but are there any examples of this style of writing? My journals are completely unwilling to share any... suggestions?

45
Is a B a bad grade at a top 10 school?

All grades are relative to your curve... with a low curve it's stellar, with the curve at my school, it puts you in the bottom third of the class.

46
You're at a T10, who cares what your grades are?  You could take a dump on the exam and still get a 6 figure job.

I'm hoping to clerk and, ideally, teach after I graduate....

As TDJD guessed ;)

47
Studying and Exam Taking / Sometimes life really does send you up and down
« on: February 07, 2007, 03:26:17 PM »
But only if you let it :)

At a T10 school, had my first grade come out near the beginning of January as a B on a B+ curve. Needless to say, at least for anyone who's been dealt a law school grade, that was rather discouraging... spent an entire month feeling like I was doomed to be a sub-par student, only to get all of my other grades within the past forty-eight hours: every other grade was at least an A- and I've found myself launched into the top 20% of the class. Just another one of life's reminders that you can't let the defeats of the day keep you down, cause you never know when things can suddenly change.

Anyone else have tales of sudden changes in fortune?

48
I've worked ten hours per week, every week (even during exam time) since I started law school and I always took at least one entire day off from studying every weekend... top 10%, managing board on law review, V3 firm.

Though there is a certain base amount of time required for studying in law school, it varies widely depending upon how efficient you are at it... I worked a sixty hour per week job for a year or two prior to starting law school, and I think that experienced disciplined me to work hard and efficiently. I really believe that regardless of how smart or dumb you feel, you'll be able to do well if you just treat it like a serious job and work hard every day from 8:00-5:00 (or 6:00), plus a little more during the exam season. Likewise, always remember that the exam is all that matters, and you need to be able to game that system.

49
Quick question/clarification: registration starts August 22nd, right? Exactly what do you do to register? I just need to be sure to do that as soon as possible so I can get the loan process moving (show me the money!)

Also, where will the sections be posted?

thanks!

And there is no registration really--I think you may sign one or two things during orientation and get your photo taken (for the online photo directory--be warned!) but it's essentially automatic.

50
Rising 2Ls,  how many OCI an average person get. Goodfella, If you dont mind asking you, how many you have?

I've got thirteen for August week--I think you're allowed up to twenty-five for August week, and then another fifteen or so during the September week. The firms are randomly divided, with two-thirds going in August and one-third in late September. Generally speaking, the lower your grades, the closer you should get to the maximum, at least according to the career services people.

Sorry about the lack of sections. Now that I think about it, I only got my section assignment a week or so before classes started. And I didn't have all my assignments for the first day of class until mid-day Monday of orientation (don't panic if this happens to you, and don't be overwhelmed if you start reading your first case and feel like it's impossible). The section assignment list will be posted in the law school and sent out via e-mail the moment it is finished, likely in an excel file (use google docs to check it out if you don't have excel).

Happy to answer any other questions in these final few days :)

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