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Messages - tankbrain

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51
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Yale Law School to allow military recruiters
« on: September 22, 2007, 01:56:56 AM »
It seems to me that military recruiters have as much a right to be present as anyone else. If one has a personal objection to their policies or to the military in general, one has the freedom to not interview with them. Not that I think anyone from Yale would be interested in JAG, strictly from a monetary standpoint.

This is simplifying the issue a bit. The issue is that employers who discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation shouldn't be allowed to recruit students from Yale Law School. Whether students want to work or whether students can easily decline to inteview with them is immaterial. They only have a right to be there if they meet certain guidelines that all employers must meet.

Shouldn't Yale not accept money from these same disciminatory employers?

They aren't accepting the money from the discriminatory employers. They are accepting it from expenditures authorized by Congress. The United States benefits by producing research in various disciplines including law, producing academics, scientists, etc.



They are accepting money from the federal government while also barring employers from the federal government. It is hypocritical.




I don't see your point.

If Yale makes a personal determination that the government is a discriminatory employer and wishes to bar them from recruiting on campus, it seems inconsistant to then accept money from that same discriminatory employer.

It seems especially hallow to argue that it is okay because only one segment of the employer discriminates.

52
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Yale Law School to allow military recruiters
« on: September 22, 2007, 01:47:40 AM »
It seems to me that military recruiters have as much a right to be present as anyone else. If one has a personal objection to their policies or to the military in general, one has the freedom to not interview with them. Not that I think anyone from Yale would be interested in JAG, strictly from a monetary standpoint.

This is simplifying the issue a bit. The issue is that employers who discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation shouldn't be allowed to recruit students from Yale Law School. Whether students want to work or whether students can easily decline to inteview with them is immaterial. They only have a right to be there if they meet certain guidelines that all employers must meet.

Shouldn't Yale not accept money from these same disciminatory employers?

They aren't accepting the money from the discriminatory employers. They are accepting it from expenditures authorized by Congress. The United States benefits by producing research in various disciplines including law, producing academics, scientists, etc.



They are accepting money from the federal government while also barring employers from the federal government. It is hypocritical.



53
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Yale Law School to allow military recruiters
« on: September 22, 2007, 01:11:45 AM »
It seems to me that military recruiters have as much a right to be present as anyone else. If one has a personal objection to their policies or to the military in general, one has the freedom to not interview with them. Not that I think anyone from Yale would be interested in JAG, strictly from a monetary standpoint.

This is simplifying the issue a bit. The issue is that employers who discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation shouldn't be allowed to recruit students from Yale Law School. Whether students want to work or whether students can easily decline to inteview with them is immaterial. They only have a right to be there if they meet certain guidelines that all employers must meet.

Shouldn't Yale not accept money from these same disciminatory employers?

54
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Yale Law School to allow military recruiters
« on: September 22, 2007, 01:07:29 AM »
I think Yale shoud've still kept the recruiters off campus.

I think they should've too. Of course, I think the government has a right to make such a choice unbearably difficult as well.

No, its stupid. Employers should have to respect the policies of the individual schools. If you don't want to employ openly gay or lesbian people then go elsewhere. If Yale students want to get a job with the Army or whatever, they'll call the military.

How can Yale refuse government employers while also accepting government money for research? If Yale feels the government policy is discriminatory, shouldn't they simply stop accepting money and sever all relations?

55
Law School Applications / Re: T25 vs. top 10% in T26 - 50
« on: August 26, 2007, 09:39:49 PM »
It was suggested to me that if one cannot earn admission to a top 25 law school, the next best thing is to graduate in the top 10% of a school ranked 26 - 50. I am speaking of career prospects in a major urban center here. Does this make sense? Of course, I think this discussion will have to exclude the very elite schools. I'm not going to suggest that the top of the American University class will be viewed by hiring partners the same way as a Yale graduate.

The reason why I discuss this is that I am very seriously considering the University of Florida. I believe that I am a very good candidate for admission and the in-state tuition is ridiculous. I liked the area and the campus when I visited there. Plus, I really do like living in Florida. I do not, however, want to completely eliminate the prospect of employment in the Northeast, or possibly Chicago. I am not being so presumptuous as to guarantee my placement in the top 10% should I be given the opportunity to attend UF, but I am haunted by the thought that I will forever lose my freedom to choose to live elsewhere. Thank you for any feedback you can provide.

By Northeast, do you mean NYC and Boston?  NYC is more forgiving to out-of-towners, and 10% would probably get you some interviews.  Regardless, top 10% will get you a solid job in the Southeast and will not preclude you from going to NYC in the future if you desire.

Going to top 25 or so schools in the region you're interested in will allow you to place lower in your class to have the same career prospects as someone from outside the region.  But keep the cost in mind, especially if you are financing your education with loans.  In my opinion, better to have little to no debt from Florida than full tuition/nonresident loans from Iowa, Minnesota, WUST, Vanderbilt, Fordham, George Washington, Boston College, Boston University, Notre Dame, Illinois, etc.

I have to disagree. Some of those schools you mentioned are just outside the T14 and are worth the extra debt. Law school is a life long investment.

56
I would vote for Wash U. Not only is it ranked higher, but it continues to rise (not only in law) while BC seems to be generally sliding. A lot of the rankings has to do with money and Wash U is loaded. Furthermore, BC seems to play second fiddle to BU in rankings, money raised, and placement. Lastly, if you really did want to practice in DC or Chicago, Wash U will place a lot better than BC.

dumb.  dumb dumb dumb.

BU is ranked 20, BC is ranked 28
BC has traditionally had the lowest endowment of any private law school among the top 50.
BU is generally more represented at V50 firms than BC.

57
If WashU has better placement, why isn't it on this list?

http://mblog.lib.umich.edu/OCSlawcareers/archives/2007/02/largest_law_fir_1.html

Also, according to this study, WashU is behind BC in national placement, at least at elite vault firms:

http://www.autoadmit.com/studies/ciolli/ciolli.final.pdf

I'm not sure why some people think WashU is so much better, besides a marginal difference in ranking. One thing that a lot of people fail to realize is that law firms' perceptions of what the best schools are is far more cemented than the marginal fluctuations of the USNews rankings.

As I said before, neither school is truly elite and neither will be breaking into the top 15, ever. Both are semi-national, regional law schools. It appears BC has a decent edge in placement over WashU though.

One more thing:

Although recruitment isn't quite the same as placement, it is interesting to note that only 185 Nalp firm offices come to WashU, while 289 come to BC.

Check for yourself:

nalpdirectory.com


In all fairness, the autoadmit article uses stats from 6 years ago. As I noted earlier, BC has fallen in the rankings during that time period while Wash U has entered the top 20.

Doing a cursory study reveals that BC law has an abysmal presence in Chicago among elite firms: zero lawyers at Skadden; zero lawyers at Winston & Strawn; zero lawyers at Kirkland & Ellis; zero lawyers at Mayer Brown; zero lawyers at McDemott, Will, & Emery...the list goes on and on. In fact, searching V100 firms (Chicago or elsewhere) for BC law alumni reveals a huge concentration in Boston. There is no arguing that BC cleans up in Boston. BCs overwhelming Biglaw placement in the Boston market produces impressive general placement stats, but OP indicated her/his desire to work in Chicago or DC. Wash U. would be much better for such a goal.

58
I would vote for Wash U. Not only is it ranked higher, but it continues to rise (not only in law) while BC seems to be generally sliding. A lot of the rankings has to do with money and Wash U is loaded. Furthermore, BC seems to play second fiddle to BU in rankings, money raised, and placement. Lastly, if you really did want to practice in DC or Chicago, Wash U will place a lot better than BC. Maybe you should tell Wash U about your situation and see if they could offer you any dough.  :)

59
Where should I go next fall? / Re: UC Hastings v. Maryland...HELP!!
« on: May 04, 2007, 05:30:46 PM »
So I have a huge dilemma and need some help/opinions/advice from anyone willing to give it to me!

I got into both UC Hastings and Maryland Law and I can't decide where to go since the two schools have the same rankings. Factors to take into consideration:

1. I'm originally from Los Angeles so I get to pay in-state tuition at Hastings, which is about 24K a year. On top of that, I received 5K a year from them, which means I would have to pay about 18K a year for tuition for three years. Maryland hasn't given me any money yet. First year tuition is about 30K and then 20K for second and third year. However, money/financial aid fortunately isn't a significant factor when making a decision.

2. I'm may be interested in applying for joint degree program. Maryland offers the program that I'm interested in while Hastings does not offer it at all.

3. I visited both schools and got a better vibe from Maryland. The surrounding area, the people, the building (only a few years old!) and facilities at Maryland were much nicer than at Hastings. Overall, I just had a better feel at Maryland. However, the library at Hastings is brand new and I know I'll be spending most of my time there.

4. Since neither school is my dream school, at the end of my first year I MAY look into possibly transferring into a better school. And the name of the school is pretty important to me. Since I have a business background, I'm potentially going to work in the family business. This means I MAY not have to worry about job prospects in the future and the name of the school I graduate from is all I have to work with (aside from passing the bar in whatever state I choose, of course). I THINK Hastings has a better name overall but maybe that's just because I'm from the West Coast. Anyone from the East care to shed some light on that matter?

I need to make a decision soon and any bit of advice would help. I've been battling back and forth with schools and have finally narrowed it down to these two. Please help!  ???

Thanks!

I was in the same position as you. I'm not from MD and was deciding between a school in my home state compared to UMD. Also like you, I will be taking over a family business and the ability to do a quality dual degree program made the difference for me in deciding between schools. I'm doing JD/MBA at Maryland and start MBA classes in the summer. Smith (Maryland's business school) also has great facilities and just cracked the top 25 for business schools. Additionally, the MBA only takes an extra 28 credits to earn. If you liked UMD and want to get the dual degree, you should come to Maryland.

60
Wait List / Re: Waitlisted @ Maryland- whatr my chances?
« on: May 02, 2007, 10:15:40 AM »
K, so Im a student at the University of Maryland, College Park. I love Maryland, I bleed the black and gold. Maryland is my first choice by far, but I was put on the regular WL (I heard from them in December or January). I sent a LOCI. My LSAT is 160 and GPA is 3.436. I am white but my dad is a Soviet refugee and I speak 3 different languages-which i guess makes me diverse, unless thats not the "diversity" that UMD seeks to celebrate and augment. What do y'all think are my chances of getting in?

You could always request to be considered for part time to be sure you get in. A lot of the part-time students are younger and end up switching to the day program after their first year.

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