Law School Discussion

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Messages - remiz22

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171
So I received notification that I was admitting over a month ago and I still haven't heard anything from them since, other than an email about Day at Northwestern Law.

Thoughout this whole process, they have yet to send me a viewbook, call, send a follow-up package, or anything else, just a letter I printed off offering admissions and a big scholarship to defer.

I know they admitted me contingent on deferring, but seriously, this is a joke.

Thoughts?

No, it's not just you. They suck.

172
Does anyone have any thoughts on the following options:

1) DePaul: $24k/year scholarship requiring a 3.3 GPA to renew
2) UC: $12k/year scholarship requiring a 2.0 GPA to renew
3) Akron: Full tuition + $10,000/year stipend requiring top 10% to renew
4) OSU: No scholarship offer yet
5) GW PT: No scholarship

I am from the Cincinnati area and would like to practice patent law in one of the few big Cincinnati patent firms after law school.  I have both a BS and an MS in Electrical Engineering.  I plan to pass the patent bar before entering law school.

I know GW is by far the best regarded school for IP law that I have been admitted to.  But, I would have to take on nearly 200k in debt to go there (unless I decide to get a job in the patent office while I attended part-time, but I think that would be way too much to handle).

DePaul has a strong reputation for IP law, but it is a regional school with strong ties to the Chicago area.  I would only have to pay about $6k a year in tuition and was virtually guaranteed a paying job during the summer between 1L and 2L due to a unique program they have for IP students.  But, I fear that after I graduated I could have trouble getting back to Cincinnati.

Akron has a good reputation for IP law and it wouldn't cost me anything as long as I could stay in the top 10% (which I realize could be a huge gamble).  But, I have the same regional concerns about Akron as I have for DePaul.

Ohio State would be significantly less debt than GW, but does not really have a reputation for IP law.  I think OSU students place well in Columbus and Cincinnati.

Cincinnati would be about $8k a year in tuition plus the cheapest living expenses of any of the schools I am considering.  It is also in the city I would like to end up in, but it doesn't have a reputation in IP law.

Is anyone else in a remotely similar situation or have any advice?  Anyone deciding among any of these schools?  I know that going to a school close to where you want to practice is ideal.  But, since I am pretty sure I want to practice patent law, will I be putting myself at a disadvantage by going to a school with few if any faculty who deal with IP law.  Does the intellectual property specialty ranking on USNWR carry any weight, or should I lean more torwards a school with a higher overall ranking?  Or, does the fact that I have a hard science background put me in a position where the regionality, ranking, and specialty of the law school I attend shouldn't matter as much?

Any thoughts, comments, questions, or concerns are greatly appreciated.  Good luck to all of you in this tough decision we face.

The Depaul offer would be awesome if not for the 3.3 requirement. A 3.3 is tough to get and it's hard to say how you will do at law school until you get there.

173
[I would be wary of Villanova though. With the addition of Drexel, there are now six law schools within 8 miles of downtown Philadelphia. This may not seem like a big deal now, but it will be annoying when you are applying for jobs in your home market and there is a glut of local law students applying for all of the same things.

(like NYC is different?)


New York City has 8.2 million residents. Philadelphia has 1.5 million residents. By that measure, NY would need to have over 25 law schools to be as saturated as Philadelphia.

The NYC legal market pulls from all over the country though, so the competition is easily more fierce...

None-the-less, Philadelphia is the 5th largest metro-area in the country (4th biggest TV market). It has 4 accredited law schools, none of which has a large class size -- they produce maybe 800 lawyers a year -- some of whom won't be staying in Philly anyway. I don't have any experience with the Legal market in PHL (and neither do you), but I really doubt that 4 schools will overload it.



I respect your point of view and I hope you don't think that I was denigrating your Alma Mater. Villanova is a fine school and the OP has a tough decision ahead.

174
Temple has an excellent rep for teaching litigation.

175
[I would be wary of Villanova though. With the addition of Drexel, there are now six law schools within 8 miles of downtown Philadelphia. This may not seem like a big deal now, but it will be annoying when you are applying for jobs in your home market and there is a glut of local law students applying for all of the same things.

(like NYC is different?)


New York City has 8.2 million residents. Philadelphia has 1.5 million residents. By that measure, NY would need to have over 25 law schools to be as saturated as Philadelphia.

176
If you want to practice in FL, UF is an excellent choice. However, outside of FL, I'm not so sure. FL is pretty different from the NE in terms of culture and climate. G'ville is an ok town, but there really isn't much else around there.

I think as with all of the decisions, where you want to end up is the most important factor.

This is really true. Florida is the best law school in the state and places great in the state, but will not help you enter many other markets. Maryland is also the best law school in the state, but will limit you to NoVA-DC-MD-Phila region. I would be wary of Villanova though. With the addition of Drexel, there are now six law schools within 8 miles of downtown Philadelphia. This may not seem like a big deal now, but it will be annoying when you are applying for jobs in your home market and there is a glut of local law students applying for all of the same things.

WTF are you talking about?  There aren't 6 law schools within 8 miles of Philly.  You have Penn, Temple & Nova - which both place well in Philly, and Rutgers-Camden.  That is 4 accreditted schools and Rutgers doesn't really place all that well in Philly.  A quick look at firms in Philly illustrates this.

There are five within 8 miles: Penn, Temple, Rutgers-Camden, Drexel, Villanova

177
If you want to practice in FL, UF is an excellent choice. However, outside of FL, I'm not so sure. FL is pretty different from the NE in terms of culture and climate. G'ville is an ok town, but there really isn't much else around there.

I think as with all of the decisions, where you want to end up is the most important factor.

This is really true. Florida is the best law school in the state and places great in the state, but will not help you enter many other markets. Maryland is also the best law school in the state, but will limit you to NoVA-DC-MD-Phila region. I would be wary of Villanova though. With the addition of Drexel, there are now six law schools within 8 miles of downtown Philadelphia. This may not seem like a big deal now, but it will be annoying when you are applying for jobs in your home market and there is a glut of local law students applying for all of the same things.

178

Another thing to consider: Indiana has four law schools and only one mid-size city in the state.

Indy is the 12th largest city in the U.S.  It is very spread out, however, and therefore may not "feel" as large as some other cities.  It has historically grown 'out' rather than 'up.'  As for the 4 schools crammed into one state:  I don't think this should be a concern for anyone considering IU-B.  Both IU law schools place heavily into Indy, and IU-B also places heavily into Chi-town.  Valpo doesn't hit either of these markets terribly hard; I'm pretty sure they place mostly in northern IN (Ft. Wayne, etc.).  ND, on the other hand, throws their graduates to the 4 winds.  Comparing ND and IU-B is not fair.  ND will give you more career flexibility than several top-20 schools, I venture to say. 

Having said this, if you wanted to work on the west coast, or in New England, IU-B may not be a sensible choice.  You could surely get there, but it might be an arduous journey. 

I don't think you would need to worry a great deal about getting a job out of IUB.  Their employment #'s are good, and I was told emphatically at a law school event (by a 3L) that they don't include non-legal jobs in their #'s.  That is, if a guy graduates and is working as a bouncer at some bar, they don't consider him employed for the purposes of their employment statistics.  92% employed in legal positions post-graduation is not too shabby. 


I think Indiana is a good school. The OP was just looking for some dissenting opinions.

179
So I'm an admit and forgot to declare a traffic violation that caused whiplash, and the question stated to exclude traffic violations that did not involve a minor injury.  For some reason I excluded this one.  I wrote them a letter explaining the incident, which is on my juvie record, and it was actually removed after I completed drivers ed and a year of safe driving.

Am I freaking out for nothing?  Has anyone ever heard of an offer being revoked for something that small, or has anyone had to submit a similar addendum? It's a T14 school.  Thanks.

It shouldn't matter. Don't worry about it.

180
what makes you say this, buddy?

One sister went to IU-B and the other one went to Notre Dame. Both had similar stats, but the one who went to Indiana didn't have great career options right out of school. She did say she loved Bloomington and would go there again for law school.

Another thing to consider: Indiana has four law schools and only one mid-size city in the state.

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