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Messages - donwario

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31
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: WUSTL and W&L
« on: March 17, 2008, 10:32:25 PM »
That site is horribly inaccurate.  I summered with a DC firm with two other W&L students, and that site indicated that there were no W&L students at the firm.  It also underreported the number of Geargetown students, and overreported the number of UVA students at the firm. 

It looks like you summered in 2005. I think the site is actually quite accurate for the years that it uses data from.

32
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: UNC v Wake Forest?
« on: March 16, 2008, 09:47:44 PM »
your thoughts? in terms of prestige/rep/street cred

Wake Forest is far better in terms of student and faculty quality. I think the "man on the street" might be more impressed by the UNC name. The most troubling occurance at UNC is their money problem and loss of top faculty. It would be a concern for me in this rankings-obsessed world.

Why do you say student body quality is better?  Wake takes anyone with a pulse and a 160, so long as the GPA is over 2.0.  UNC is much more difficult to get into, and they tend to require a very solid GPA even with a great LSAT score.

 ???

Wake's 25th percentile is 161

Ok, maybe it is more like 162+.  The point is, UNC is a traditionally stronger school that is more difficult to get into, and the only reason Wake's LSAT numbers seem decent is because the school is small and admits applicants with solid LSAT scores and brutal GPAs, while UNC rejects every non-NC applicant below a 3.5 GPA.

Point taken. UNC has been a stronger school in the past and currently has a lower admit late. But I'm not sure that I follow the argument about the current student quality though. First, Wake should not be penalized for choosing to have a smaller class. Second, while it is no doubt a cause of their lower LSAT numbers, I'm not sure that the UNC admissions policy to reject every sub-3.5 applicant is relevant to the straightforward question of which school has the better student quality. Wake's 25th percentile LSAT is 3 points higher than UNC and its 75th percentile is a point higher than UNC. Also, Wake's 75th percentile GPA is only .06 lower than GPA obsessed UNC. Wake also has a nearly 10% higher bar passage rate than UNC for the North Carolina bar.

As for teacher quality, there is no getting around the fact that UNC is hemorrhaging its best tenured faculty. In terms of teacher accessibility, the "student to faculty" rate at UNC is nearly twice as high as the ratio at Wake.

Even with all this, I think the "man on the street" would still be more impressed by a UNC degree than one from Wake Forest.

33
Berkeley Raises $1.1 Billion to Keep Professors From Ivy League

By Brian K. Sullivan and Matthew Keenan

March 14 (Bloomberg) -- The University of California, Berkeley, the highest-ranked state college in the U.S., has raised $1.1 billion toward a war chest to fight raids on its faculty by wealthier schools like Harvard and Yale.

The money will endow chairs for 100 professors. Berkeley's teachers now often earn less than counterparts at Harvard University, may soon be underpaid by 30 percent, and are vulnerable to higher offers, Chancellor Robert Birgeneau said. The school will also overhaul management of its $2.9 billion endowment to match the 23 percent return at Harvard's $34.9 billion fund, Birgeneau said. ``These institutions are competing for exactly the same faculty that we are trying to hire and so an important question is whether the public universities are going to be able to compete,'' Birgeneau, 65, said in an interview.

Berkeley has been hit by increased competition for students as Harvard and other elite schools step up financial aid, becoming cheaper than Berkeley for some families. Berkeley has lost at least 30 faculty members since 2003 to its eight primary competitors, led by Harvard. The California school also faces a 10 percent cut in state subsidies under the budget proposed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Berkeley, which counts 44 Nobel Prize winners among its alumni and past and present faculty, is the highest-ranking public-supported university in U.S. News & World Report magazine's 2008 list, and places 21st overall. The school argues it deserves support because, unlike elite private universities, Berkeley has a mission of educating a broad cross-section of students, Birgeneau said. Thirty-one percent of Berkeley's undergraduates, most of whom are from California, are eligible for federal Pell grants for students whose family income is less than $45,000.


Harvard's Sticker Price

There are about 7,500 Pell-eligible students at Berkeley, more ``than are present on the campuses of all the Ivy League universities put together,'' Birgeneau said. Twelve percent of Harvard's students qualified for Pell grants, as did 9.4 percent of Yale University's in 2006, according to the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. Berkeley's fees, housing, books and other expenses bring the typical cost for California residents to $25,300. The sticker price for Harvard is $45,620. Competition for low- and middle-income students is intensifying, as Harvard, Yale and other schools have sweetened financial-aid plans. Harvard is waiving all costs for students from households earning less than $60,000 annually. Grants from Berkeley lower its costs to $8,000 for families making less than $40,000, Birgeneau said.Harvard is also instituting a sliding scale, with contributions from households earning up to $180,000 capped at 10 percent of income. Families earning $90,000 pay the full price at Berkeley, Birgeneau said.


Professor Pay

The average salary for a full professor at Berkeley in fiscal 2006 was $134,672, or 15 percent less than the average earned by counterparts at private institutions, according to the university. Associate professors made $88,576, or 14 percent less than peers. Econometrician Guido Imbens left Berkeley for Harvard in 2006; chemical engineering professor Arup Chakraborty went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005; and law professor Robert Post joined Yale in 2003.

Chakraborty, 46, worked at Berkeley for more than 16 years. When he was considering leaving for MIT, Berkeley offered to establish an endowed chair for him, narrowing the financial differences between the schools. ``It is true that over the long term, private schools do offer endowed chairs that are more sustainable,'' Chakraborty said. ``In general, for Berkeley, it is a bit of a problem.''


State Deficit

The state of California is projecting an $8 billion budget deficit by June 30, 2009. Schwarzenegger has proposed a 10 percent spending cut, while Democrats in the Legislature want to raise taxes to meet part of the shortfall. The state gave Berkeley $508.5 million in fiscal 2007, excluding research contracts. Harvard's endowment, meanwhile, soared $5.7 billion, and provided $1 billion toward the annual budget. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, in Menlo Park, California, made a $113 million challenge grant to Berkeley in September, the largest gift in the university's 140-year history.

The Hewlett grant earmarked $3 million so Berkeley could study how to manage its endowment to match returns at elite schools. Berkeley's assets are split, with $2.1 billion handled by the board of regents and $840 million by the University of California, Berkeley Foundation. Berkeley plans to form an investment company to manage the foundation's share, said Scott Biddy, 43, a vice chancellor.


Endowing Chairs

The school plans to raise $107 million from other donors and pair it with the Hewlett gift to create the 100 endowed chairs. There are 1,350 tenured and tenure-track faculty, and 351 endowed chairs backed by $458 million in assets. Craigslist Inc., the San Francisco-based provider of online advertisements, has pledged $1.6 million to establish Berkeley's first endowed chair for new media. So far, the drive has attracted 15 additional grants. ``Our base doesn't rival that of Harvard or Princeton, but it is enough for us to improve significantly our financial position,'' Birgeneau said. Berkeley gathered commitments for the $1.1 billion in advance of announcing a multi-billion dollar fund drive that begins next September, Birgenau said. The university hasn't set a goal or schedule for the drive. Berkeley's last campaign, ended in 2000, amassed $1.4 billion.
 



34
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: UNC v Wake Forest?
« on: March 15, 2008, 11:53:39 AM »
your thoughts? in terms of prestige/rep/street cred

Wake Forest is far better in terms of student and faculty quality. I think the "man on the street" might be more impressed by the UNC name. The most troubling occurance at UNC is their money problem and loss of top faculty. It would be a concern for me in this rankings-obsessed world.

Why do you say student body quality is better?  Wake takes anyone with a pulse and a 160, so long as the GPA is over 2.0.  UNC is much more difficult to get into, and they tend to require a very solid GPA even with a great LSAT score.

 ???

Wake's 25th percentile is 161

35
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: UNC v Wake Forest?
« on: March 13, 2008, 06:14:03 PM »
your thoughts? in terms of prestige/rep/street cred

Wake Forest is far better in terms of student and faculty quality. I think the "man on the street" might be more impressed by the UNC name. The most troubling occurance at UNC is their money problem and loss of top faculty. It would be a concern for me in this rankings-obsessed world.

36
Acceptances / Re: Fordham or Pepperdine??
« on: March 10, 2008, 11:24:41 AM »
There is no doubt that Fordham is a 10x better school than Pepperdine. But if OP wants only California, Pepperdine is going to place much, much better there. Fordham places well, but not outside NY.

37
So no consensus on this then...

I'm just really afraid of not getting that high paying job out of UT and getting saddled with debt whereas if this were to happen coming out of WUSTL, the debt would be minimal.  Also worried about UT raising tuition.

I think this is correct. Law schoool outside the T14 is a gamble. If you can avoid having any debt and still go to a T25 school, I would take it.

Your position assumes he is going to have the grades to obtain a decent paying summer gigs, otherwise he will still take out significant amounts of money for living expenses.  If you make that assumption, he has beat the game and will get a decent paying firm job after graduation, which makes the concern regarding debt:income moot.

I see your point. I guess I felt that living expenses will have to paid no matter where OP goes to law school and that the real debt issue comes into play with respect to massive tuition loans. If OP were to miss BigLaw at both WUSTL and Texas, I think he would feel a lot better about having paid for living expenses and gotten a free education than he would if he paid for living expenses and also had to be on the hook for $$$ in tuition loans.

38
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Want to go to LS in DC
« on: March 10, 2008, 11:04:31 AM »
Hey everyone whats up, I'm new.

I went to Michigan State Undergrad and have been out a couple years working in sales.

Here's the situation:  I had always planned (for the last 6 months) to go to school in my home state of Michigan.  I wouldnt get into U of M, but I got into Wayne State and MSU.  I got a 159 (the second time lol) and had about a 3.0 coming out of undergrad.  I feel like the work expirence helps and I think I have a good PS and LOR's. 

Anyhow, now my gf got a job in DC so I applied late (feb. 2nd) to the DC schools.  GW is a real long shot, American is a strech but Catholic is more in my league.  Now my gf has moved and I'm freaking out waiting to hear from any of those schools.  I know there is nothing anyone can do, but I was hoping that someone is having a similar expirence or something. 

Anyone going to CUA?  Think I'll get in?  Where do law students live in the DC metro area?

Thanks

You could try american part-time

39
So no consensus on this then...

I'm just really afraid of not getting that high paying job out of UT and getting saddled with debt whereas if this were to happen coming out of WUSTL, the debt would be minimal.  Also worried about UT raising tuition.

I think this is correct. Law schoool outside the T14 is a gamble. If you can avoid having any debt and still go to a T25 school, I would take it.

40
Hey guys, I have a question--but first the bio. Late Twenties African-American Male; Graduated from California State University, Sacramento with B.A. in mathematics(3.26gpa)--not a great school reputation wise; currently highschool teaching in inner city school(1 year); Served in Iraq for a year with Army in 2003(Military Police).
  The question:  What type of LSAT score do I need in June to go to a top 15 Law School. Thanks in advance for your responses.

First off, thank you for your service.

In response to your question, there is a big difference in what you will need for HYS and what you will need for T14. If you were willing to go to Georgetown part-time, a score in the mid to high 150's would make you competative with your background. In terms of full-time, you could be competative at many 8-14 with a score higher than 160. I agree with the earlier post saying 162 would make you pretty safe. With respect to HYS, I think you will need to crack the high 160's (maybe 168 or so) to have a good chance.

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