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Messages - donwario

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11
Where should I go next fall? / Re: BC vs. Money
« on: March 28, 2008, 02:07:02 PM »
so as everyone probably knows, i really have my heart set on bc for the fall. i just checked my fin aid package, however, and it's not so great. i have other schools that have offered me money, and at this point, i'm freaked out at having to take out so many loans, especially with my interest in pursuing a career in public interest. i still have loans from undergrad, my parents are not supporting me in law school (my dad isn't really even employed and my sister is still in ug herself). i don't know if bc will come through with merit money. there's also a private scholarship from my ug for which i'm applying, but again, nothing is a guarantee. should i just throw caution to the wind, say eff it, and go for bc, and work my tail off for any scholarship opportunities which might come my way? or should i consider some of the lower ranked schools who are throwing money in my face?

do you mind listing the other choices?

of course not. so far i've been accepted to northeastern, tulane, cardozo, all with money, and suffolk with a little bit of money (some sort of small grant). i feel like i'm missing some schools, but those are the important ones.

Tulane and Cardozo are certainly good choices. May I ask how much each one offered?

12
Apparently, Emory places well in the South East and in Chicago. At least that's what their "promo alumnus" told me on the phone. Since I've decided not to go there though, I didn't bother investigating further.


Emory does not place well in Chicago.

13
9 times out of 10, Michigan would be the clear choice. But looking at your stated facts (paying for law school on your own, being very anti-debt, not caring about BigLaw, wanting a collegial atmosphere, and not liking college towns) WUSTL seems like the best choice. Although if Vandy could up their offer, Vandy might be the right choice.

14
Where should I go next fall? / Re: BC vs. Money
« on: March 28, 2008, 12:25:17 PM »
so as everyone probably knows, i really have my heart set on bc for the fall. i just checked my fin aid package, however, and it's not so great. i have other schools that have offered me money, and at this point, i'm freaked out at having to take out so many loans, especially with my interest in pursuing a career in public interest. i still have loans from undergrad, my parents are not supporting me in law school (my dad isn't really even employed and my sister is still in ug herself). i don't know if bc will come through with merit money. there's also a private scholarship from my ug for which i'm applying, but again, nothing is a guarantee. should i just throw caution to the wind, say eff it, and go for bc, and work my tail off for any scholarship opportunities which might come my way? or should i consider some of the lower ranked schools who are throwing money in my face?

do you mind listing the other choices?

15
Is it easy to find jobs in NY or DC coming out of: UNC, Emory, Boston U?

I fear the answer is no.

The answer is not really. None of the schools do very well in DC, so you would need to be around top 15% to have a good shot at BigLaw.

Emory and BU do pretty well in NY. Top 25% (maybe even top 1/3 for BU) should give you a decent shot at NY BigLaw.

16
Where should I go next fall? / Re: BU vs BC ($$$) and Waitlists
« on: March 28, 2008, 12:17:07 PM »
The difference between BU and BC is minimal. If BC is offering significant money, it is worth it to go there over BU.

17
You're a fool.

Where did you get the idea that the 3L year will simply be playing gofer for a law firm?  The 3L year will still be mostly in a classroom setting, just as it currently is.  Although W&L is trying to brand this is some dramatic change, I really do not think it will be.

I think that some of the answers given by the W&L posters have been very misleading. When I asked whether the program allows for 3L's to opt out, Avicenna posted that it did. As it turns out, only the current students can opt-out, but ALL future students must submit to the new program as a 3L.

Now, this recent post by Lenny makes it seem as if the new curriculum is no big change and that 3L will still be mostly traditional classroom work. From all of the available articles, it seems that nothing could be further from the truth. Every article about the program identifies it as a radical change.

To get the truth, I went to W&L's own webpage:
-"The Washington and Lee University School of Law is embarking on a dramatic revision of its law school curriculum, entirely reinventing the third year"
-"Students will not study law from books or sit in classrooms engaging in dialogue with a professor at a podium.  The demanding intellectual content of the third year will instead be presented in realistic settings."

When it comes to your school, it is fine to be an advocate. But I don't think it is right to sell prospective students a false bill of goods. 

18
Acceptances / Re: Accepted at Rutgers Newark!
« on: March 25, 2008, 07:53:10 PM »
Congrats!

19
So, getting back to some of the original points, the school will be hiring the same kinds of professors who will be able to engage in the traditional scholarship on their area of expertise, as well as maybe some new stuff.

I doubt it. Unless they leave the third year teaching in the hands of adjuncts, the new focus on professionalism and practice will require that they hire a whole new set of "practice-oriented" professors. Either way, this will turn off elite faculty. It will also turn off elite faculty that they can only teach law electives to 2L's. As odd as it sounds, the most influential law professors are generally not interested in or familiar with "practice". They care about scholarship and academia.

This is very true. If anything, this move by W&L goes away from what top law schools are doing. Interdisciplinary studies, economics and the law, and PhD/JD programs are what top schools have been focusing on and also what attracts the best faculty. While the top 6 schools rule the roost in these areas, you can see efforts by the top 25 schools (especially at Vanderbilt, WUSTL, UCLA, and Illinois) to compete.

What W&L is doing parallels more with the kind of practical legal instruction being offered at schools like Northeastern and Drexel. Lesser schools have used legal practice to distinguish themselves in competitive markets, but W&L sould not need to do this. I find it very odd and perilous that a school of W&Lís stature is doing this. 


Very good points, but I do think W&L might be taking this approach in part due to necessity. The location of Lexington has made it difficult for the school to attract great professors as of late. In the last year or two, the school has lost some of its best people (Dean Partlett, Krotosynski, Johnson, Brown, Morant, Gallanis) in most cases losing them to less prestigious law schools. Part of it no doubt has to do with wealthier schools buying away professors and the remoteness of W&L pushing others away. With this in mind, it may simply be that W&L has decided that they cannot compete anymore for elite faculty, so they are taking a radical new approach to differentiate themselves. It took a lot of courage by W&L to set this program up, but it does seem like a huge gamble though.

20
If the requirements for keeping the scholarship are the same for each school, I would choose Cardozo.

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