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Messages - loki13

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41
Hello I need help! I want to go into either child advocacy law or criminal law and I want to know if anyone knows of any good schools with great programs for either of these majors? :o

1. There are no "majors" in law school. Just a JD.

2. Any school will teach you enough to go into child advocacy law or criminal law.

3. Do not believe the self-rankings of schools regarding their programs; with a very few exceptions (such as tax law, which you need an LLM for anyway) it doesn't matter at all. Certainly not for those areas.

4. Go to the school the you like, that is the least expensive, in the geographic area that you believe you will practice.

Finally, good luck. Those are two fields that I could never practice in. It's not the law - it's the facts, if you know what I mean.

42
Not enough information in this post.

As a usual rule, you have to disclose crimes and academic discipline. You will likely have to disclose this event to the law schools you apply to, and to any Bar that you take. You will need to be more candid than, "Put a little crudely, we got very loud[.]" Were you having loud consensual intercourse? Were you having a loud argument?

Assuming there are no other issues, so long as you are candid, this shouldn't be a bar for admission to a school, or admission to a bar.

43
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: August 08, 2016, 10:09:38 AM »
Oh ... Julie Fern.

Ha!

44
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: August 08, 2016, 10:06:48 AM »
Julie.........please stop pretending you know grammar or wtf strawman is..........

It is Julie!

Julie, you shouldn't have reverted back to your old syntax patterns. Too easy.

Story time?

45
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: August 05, 2016, 01:33:48 PM »
I lose cases

The only true thing you've said today.

You're kidding, right? Spicy Troll isn't an attorney!

After all, anyone who combines the emotional maturity of a spoiled six-year old with the internet acumen of your crazy grandfather isn't an attorney. Spicy Troll probably assumes this is the local newspaper ... sorry ... periodical commenting section.

That said, I did appreciate the unintentional comedy in someone who continually references the perfidy of Nixon, and then, without irony, employs the "silent majority" phrasing to back up their contentions. Good times!

Lol. Silent majority different than southern strategy. I knew trip you up.  You not good at this.

Is it actually possible for you to be less intelligent? I think not.

https://chnm.gmu.edu/hardhats/silent.html

46
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: August 05, 2016, 08:40:24 AM »
I lose cases

The only true thing you've said today.

You're kidding, right? Spicy Troll isn't an attorney!

After all, anyone who combines the emotional maturity of a spoiled six-year old with the internet acumen of your crazy grandfather isn't an attorney. Spicy Troll probably assumes this is the local newspaper ... sorry ... periodical commenting section.

That said, I did appreciate the unintentional comedy in someone who continually references the perfidy of Nixon, and then, without irony, employs the "silent majority" phrasing to back up their contentions. Good times!

47
There's a few different issues in your letter.

In no particular order-

1. How will a school view your withdrawal from another law school 20 years ago? Eh, whatever. If you withdrew because of personal drama and finances and youth (which it sounds like), it shouldn't matter at all, and what will be more relevant is what you've been doing for 20 years. What is most relevant is your LSAT score.

2. Will a school care that you turned them down 20 years ago? No, not really.

3. Can you get admitted somewhere? Probably. But you need to see how you do when you re-take your LSAT. You can't use a score from 20 years ago.

4. I don't know your exact age, but you will be going as a non-traditional student. Look at some resources for that. IME, non-traditional students tend to do better at law school than people straight out of UG, simply because they are more motivated and treat it like a job (that's a generality, and there are many bright, motivated people coming straight through as well - but you usually don't have non-trads that are "man, I don't know what to do with my life"). On the other hand, actual academics might be a shock to the system. Whatever you do, remember that you'll be missing out on three years of prime earning power if you go full time, and minimize your costs.

48
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: August 02, 2016, 08:16:30 AM »
One Bernie sanders supporter laid out the dark choices ...

Talking about yourself in the third person is the first sign of mental illness.

49
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: UMass going anywhere?
« on: July 29, 2016, 08:46:15 AM »
Meh, this is stuff that only undergrad people in LSAT prep, Deans, and the literal employees at US News&World Report worry about.

That's not quite true. The following statements can both be true-

The difference between Nos. 40 and 70 in the rankings is minuscule.
The difference between Yale and Cooley is vast.

As I've repeatedly stated, USNWR does a very poor job sorting similar schools. Is Stanford "better" or "worse" than Harvard? Is UNC "better" or "worse" than Arizona State? And so on. However, it does a fairly good job of giving people a general idea of the rough sorting of the schools- because it reflects the consensus esteem that the schools are held in, and the LSAT/uGPA scores of the students within the schools - and, yes, this tends to be self supporting, because to the extent that a school is "good" in USNWR, it will continue to attract good students (a virtuous circle) and to the extent it is "bad," it will struggle to attract good students, and those factors will impact the esteem in which the school is held (which is also part of the rankings).

And this matters. Because signalling matters. If you are looking to work near where your law school is located, then most attorneys know the school. But what if you aren't? Or what if you want to apply for clerkships in different areas? Yes, after some time in practice, your actual work (and, hopefully, book of business) will matter a great deal more, but until then ...

Whether it should matter or not is a different question. But the rankings both reflect reality, and reinforce it.


50
I have 2 cases on my record (both nonpublic). One for jostling (pushing someone)(misdemeanor) and the other for credit card fraud (felony). I've paid my debt to society with both and both are now off of my record. I also have an embezzlement charge which was dismissed. I am wondering if I am still able to go to law school and take the bar exam? Will this look TOO bad? I DEEPLY regret my actions and have not done anything since. All of these crimes have been committed within the past 3 years. Will they give me mercy? Do I still have a chance?

I'm going to give you a typical attorney answer. Maybe?

Let's start with the very bad. The number of crimes (three- that's more than one, or two, although it is unclear if the embezzlement was part of the credit card fraud or a separate incident). The type of crimes (jostling, alone, would be no big deal, but credit card fraud and embezzlement both go to honesty and character & fitness qualifications - in addition, expect some probing into your finances in many jurisdictions). And the timeline (they were within the last three years; it's hard to show evidence of significant rehabilitation within a short time frame). You are going to have problems, even though they are off your record.

Now, the good. Context will matter. Assuming you accepted responsibility, made any court-ordered restitution, and can adequately explain both why it happened then and why it won't happen again, you should have a shot.

Different states have different rules, and different schools do as well. Find out if there are any specific to the school/state you wish to practice in. The best rule of thumb is to disclose everything. The Bar will want to know about the charges, even if they were dropped or removed from your record.

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