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Messages - loki13

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31
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: November 14, 2016, 12:06:12 PM »
Too bad he's behind in Michigan, Florida, and Pennsylvania.

No Cinnamon, this race will be called pretty early. He'll lose Florida. Not by much, but he'll lose it. After that, he's done. He'd have to pull off an upset in Michigan and Pennsylvania, something like that. Not gonna happen.

Just curious, what will you do when HRC becomes POTUS? I'm not exactly happy about it myself, but what will your narrative be then? Let me guess, it was rigged?

I am excited for the day after tomorrow.

Because I assume that Cinnamon Julie Troll will be back on her meds.

Still excited?

I'll be excited, but only to the extent that Cinnamon Troll stops posting. I haven't made any substantive comments about this election since July (when I wrote that I was worried, except for Cinnamon Troll's confidence). Having followed the 538 models, I was seriously concerned about the actual outcome that we saw- a popular vote win for Clinton, but an electoral college loss.

Unfortunately, being (somewhat) plugged in to the local political establishment locally, I saw some early warning signs the day of, and I knew he had likely won by 7:30pm EST. I am still in a little shock- not so much because I didn't see it coming, but because I lack the imagination to believe that many Americans would vote for Trump, despite the fact that I knew they were doing so.

So I balance on that knife's edge- the pessimism that Americans elected our first internet troll, who ran on a lark and has no idea what to do, versus the optimism that democracy is the belief that people deserve what they vote for- good and hard.

32
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: November 07, 2016, 01:59:36 PM »
Too bad he's behind in Michigan, Florida, and Pennsylvania.

No Cinnamon, this race will be called pretty early. He'll lose Florida. Not by much, but he'll lose it. After that, he's done. He'd have to pull off an upset in Michigan and Pennsylvania, something like that. Not gonna happen.

Just curious, what will you do when HRC becomes POTUS? I'm not exactly happy about it myself, but what will your narrative be then? Let me guess, it was rigged?

I am excited for the day after tomorrow.

Because I assume that Cinnamon Julie Troll will be back on her meds.

33
Law School Admissions / Re: Any good ideas for my undergrad?
« on: November 07, 2016, 06:52:46 AM »
Hint: (since I already predict a lack of digestion on this very simple concept)

If you were to IVY for undergrad, you are most likely to STAY in IVY after that (even if you have to bounce to other T1 schools, its still WAY easier to get in with an IVY undergrad-it just is, it just is)

I know I shouldn't engage, since despite your frequent name changes, you still evince a complete inability to stay focused on the issue. But here goes-

Two things-

1. The OP was asking about college majors. This has nothing to do with that.

2. Correlation is not causation. Law schools do not care where you went to undergraduate. Certain schools (Ivies, for example) are able to attract "better" (as in, more likely to do well on standardized test, for example) applicants. Therefore, when these same undergrads take the LSAT, they are (all things being equal), more likely to do well than a similarly situated person from State U., even assuming no difference in education during the undergraduate period.

It's another example of the Big Fish/Small Pond v. Small Fish/Big Pond scenario. There's no law school that's says, OMG, look at this Harvard UG- we have to accept him despite his 150 LSAT!

That said, there are a (very) few anecdotal examples of a small preference being accorded for certain cases- see, e.g., a triple eagle (BC High School, UG, Law School applicant). And going to Harvard (or another Ivy) may give you collateral benefits (networking, the ability to say, "I went to a school in Boston ... oh, which one? So glad you asked.").


34
Law School Admissions / Re: Any good ideas for my undergrad?
« on: November 04, 2016, 10:30:59 AM »
@#!* it go to cooley, apparently no one cares about anything anymore

Not the point at all. Your law school matters greatly, as does your relative rank within the law school and what you did at the law school (law review/journals, moot court, trial team, research assistant, book awards, summer gigs etc.). This will help you get your first job and will follow you for a period of time (until you have some real experience, a book of business, etc.).

That's the thing- for law jobs, it's the law school (and performance therein) that matters. Not the undergraduate performance or degree. The undergrad performance only matters to get into the good law school. In a certain way, that performance is "baked in" to the law school.

35
Law School Admissions / Re: Any good ideas for my undergrad?
« on: November 03, 2016, 12:16:56 PM »
As for as getting IN to the JD I agree with the last two posters.

BUT

ONCE THEY KICK YOU OUT OF THAT COMFY WOMB AND MAKE YOU GET A DAMN JOB..................

It matters a LOT. Maybe it didn't used to, but it does now days. Employers want those transcripts from undergrad too if you plan to work for someone else. Most specialty types of law "prefers" (requires) specific undergrad too.
Plus of course if you ever want to do anything even remotely patent related its a LEGAL REQUIRMENT
or if you want to do tax you can just forget it if you aren't also a CPA or have an LLM in tax law

Stupid? Sure. True? Yeah.

This is not accurate, in my opinion and from my observations. If you do have an interest in patent law (which you did not indicate ... patent law is pretty much the polar opposite of environmental and civil right law), then I would recommend a B.S. But that's not at issue.

My first job was in BigLaw- they never inquired about my uGPA (undergrad GPA). Since then, I have never been asked for my uGPA at any position, and as someone who has hired other attorneys (including those fresh out of law school), I have never asked about the uGPA. Because I don't care. No one I know cares.

Maybe there's someone, somewhere, who cares. But I have yet to meet them.

They don't care about your major, either, unless it's for conversation (some interesting major you can talk about). No one cares. Not a little, not a lot, about what you did in undergrad, or in high school, or in grade school. C'est la vie.

36
Law School Admissions / Re: Any good ideas for my undergrad?
« on: November 01, 2016, 09:47:31 AM »
Your undergraduate degree (given these choices, and your stated desires) doesn't matter. Honestly.

Choose the one that you have the most interest in. Do really well (your GPA matters a lot). Then take the LSAT. But law schools don't care, at all, what your major is in undergrad- especially when it's a standard "liberal arts" major. So choose what you like, and do well.

37
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Low Diagnostic Score & Study Timeline
« on: September 19, 2016, 08:19:55 AM »
Please forgive me, I'm sure this is a regurgitation of someone else's post, but I just took a diagnostic test and am unhappy with my score: 134. In my own defense, I was not concentrating (at all), skimming through the passages, and did not time myself (i.e., not working "under pressure").
I am set to take the LSAT in December, and have signed up (cringes) for an online Kaplan prep course, coupled with a few study guides (LSAT for Dummies and Barron's). Assuming I really "hit the books", is there a realistic chance I can score in the 150s-160s range?
I am not aiming to go to a top 10 school, my desire to attend law school is to come back to my small town and help in the education sector in helping low-income families navigate the system as well as revising policies (I am a teacher right now and am finishing up my Masters, if that's of any benefit).
Any feedback would be much appreciated. Thank you much.
-A

So, let's start with the basics.

First, that is a really, really low score. There's no way around it. And time pressure should make it worse, not better. It would be easier to analyze if you had taken it more seriously.

What does it mean? Well, the LSAT does not correlate perfectly to professional success, but it does have some predictive power in "thinking like an attorney." If, after real preparation, your score does not significantly improve (to, say, 150 minimum) I would seriously reconsider going to law school.

So two points-

First, the two primary areas that you can see improvement on are general test taking strategies, and logic games (or whatever they are called now). Some people just aren't good at understanding how to approach standardized tests- this is something that you can work on. Logic games are something that can be improved through specific strategies that you may not have. Remember that- and work hard on learning how to do them.

Second, the benefit of a high LSAT score given your desires is to get a scholarship at a lower-ranked school. Scholarships will be based on your uGPA (undergrad GPA) and LSAT score. You want to minimize your cost of attendance- look at state schools as well.

Finally, there are websites (such as lawschoolnumbers) that will provide snapshots of how other applicants are doing, and websites (lawschooltransparency) that provide good metrics on the lawschool based on publicly available information. Do you research, and don't rely on the schools' brochures.

Good luck.

38
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: POTUS
« on: September 08, 2016, 10:12:12 AM »
To those hundreds of folks who check into this thread

I think Julie needs a wellness check.

I think, like, five people read this thread. Julie, and four people to make fun of her.

39
too long and pointless, didn't read............reality remains reality.


If anus hurts too bad to absorb the majors part, focus on the clinics part.

Awwww... what was your law school major? Was it learning how to find a process server?

40

Not true, MANY have majors as options, and without question concentrations on the rest, and different quality of clinics for options (if any at all in those specific areas)

Muahahahaha!

Many law schools have "majors" as options? Really?

So, when I'm on the hiring committee, and someone tells me that they received a JD with a major in corporate law* ... do you think I'm going to laugh, or just toss the applicant's file?

So, moving on from that foolishness (you get a Doctorate in Jurisprudence, not a Bachelor of Science/Arts with a major), let's address your other incorrect points.

Do schools offer concentrations / certificates / gold stars? Of course they do! After all, they need things to put in brochures for impressionable 0Ls. You know, the kind that think, "I wanna be an international lawyer!" Allow me to rank the value of these concentrations / certificates / gold stars in the real world (assuming you haven't been practicing for a while, in which case, who cares what you did in school?)-
1. Class Rank/School.
2. Law review/ Moot court.
3. Trial Team
4. Jobs / Positions taken during 1L and 2L summers
5. RA to Professor, other academic work.
6. Secondary journal.
7. Cool facts about the person, like their middle name.
....
38. Concentration.

I kid, but only slightly. Because these "certificates" and "concentrations" have no more validity than what the school says they have. They are just another thing to on your resume - nothing more, nothing less. And they are almost all a big joke.

Do some schools have better clinics? Sure. Can I think of a school that doesn't offer clinics in criminal law? No. Is this something that someone will easily find out, as opposed to every single school saying they offer "amazing clinics, with hand-on ability to work with actual clients and practitioners!" Nope. Isn't it true that only a small percentage of the student body will usually take advantage of the amazing opportunities, while the vast majority won't- yep (and can you blame some of them- if you're going into transaction work, why the heck do you need a litigation clinic)?

Finally, let's look at the request. Even assuming you weren't wrong (which is difficult, but we're analyzing a hypothetical here), the specific question was directed toward criminal law and child advocacy law. Now, I respect people that can practice in those fields. And while "child advocacy law" is somewhat ill-defined for purposes of the question, family law and criminal law as fields are the two easiest areas to break into, if that's what someone would like to do. I'm not saying that all areas of each are equally easy to get into- the difference between federal prosecution and state public defense is ... not small.

Anyway, to sum up- please don't believe the crud law schools are shoveling at you.



*Except someone with that lack of knowledge wouldn't say corporate law, they'd say M&A, because of course they would.

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