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Messages - Einstein

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21
Hi, I have a question about being a 1L student without a car at U of San Diego. I currently don't own a car. I have a licence, but I haven't driven in the past 8 years, so, once I get a car, I'll need to learn driving all over again. My question is how is life in San Diego for a student who doesn't have a car? Have you met students who are without a car and manage to survive without it? Are there any grocery stores within walking distance of the campus? Is it possible to live within walkling distance of the campus for reasonable price? How is the traffic and parking? (i.e., If someone is an inexperienced driver is San Diego a scary place to be learning to drive?)

Sorry for not answering right away, I have been busy lately prepping for finals.

USD is on a HUGE hill.  And unless you live on campus, then you will have to walk up the hill.. assuming you live right in front of the school. I havent seen any grocery stores nearby either.  But there is a trolley system that has a stop about .5 miles from school (maybe less). 

The trolley stops at around Morena and Linda Vista san diego, ca
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=&saddr=Morena+and+Linda+Vista+san+diego,+ca&daddr=brunner+and+linda+vista+San+Diego,+CA+92110&sll=32.769775,-117.18981&sspn=0.008426,0.018582&ie=UTF8&ll=32.766798,-117.193823&spn=0.008426,0.018582&z=16

The Trolley goes all over San Diego, it goes straight through Mission Valley.  My apartment actually has a trolley stop at it.  It's called The Promenade at Rio Vista. http://www.promenadeliving.com/homeset.html
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=&saddr=Morena+Blvd+%26+Linda+Vista+Rd,+San+Diego,+CA+92110&daddr=8405+Rio+San+Diego+Dr,+San+Diego,+CA+92108&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=32.527387,76.113281&ie=UTF8&ll=32.767574,-117.178717&spn=0.033705,0.074329&z=14

USD is in a busy part of town.  Not right near school, but about .5 miles away, there are a lot of cars zooming around everywhere.  And it has a lot of hills, and the roads are all squiggly and deadend alot.  If you dont know the area at all, then you might have trouble.  I have not met anyone that doesnt have a car, but I am sure there is at least 1 person doing it. 

There are on campus housing.  I suggest, do the on campus housing, you can walk to class, and I think that campus takes shuttles to stores in San Diego.  Contact the university and ask if they do this. 

Good Luck!

22
MORE REPOST FROM ABOVE



Another thing, when you enter law school.. the first day (if you sit at the back of the class) you will notice that everyone will be taking notes in class in a pre-existing outline.  You will either be wondering "how do these people have outlines already" or you will be one of them.  If you are one of them, then you will have found a 2L that has taken the class before and has given you an old outline. You will then take this outline and think it is GOD.

Dont fall into this trap. Some people will be typing everything that the professor says... even the "ums and the uhs"
I call these the "transcriptionists".. Dont be that person either.

Buy Microsoft OneNote and create your different tabs, start a new sheet for each class, and label each sheet with "heading from outline if possible" and "date of class" ---> so later you can coordinate with your syllabus and the pages in your casebook which they correspond to...once you have this set up, then when your prof. talks about a case, type the cases name. a brief description of the facts, (ex. hubby that kills wife b/c she said she was cheating) then type the issue or args. of both sides, then what the court decides. (Maybe the "rationale" to)

And type anything important your prof. says about it.  this means, any test, majority, minority, any particular language the court used that is important, elements of a rule or test, etc.



Now let me talk about books once you get to LS... you need to buy your casebook obviously.. (color red probably)
then look to buy a "case brief" book, that is keyed to your casebook.  Keyed means it has the same cases your casebook has and it says it is for the author of your casebook.  (these books are worth their cost in Gold, for lack of a better description)... The only other thing I would consider buying is E and Es example and explamations books.. I use them from time to time, but sometimes I only open the book like 2 times in a semester.. they are hit or miss..

study groups are good, but law students like to act like they know what's going on but they really dont.  This is sometimes the deliberate intent of the student.. but the nature of the material breeds this type of behavior.  You might think you know something until you talk to someone else, then you realize that you have it all wrong.  But many times you will find that others have interpreted the material wrong, or have left something out of their analysis.

This is why you should be wary of groups.  You never know what you are going to get. (forest style)

It took me the first semester to learn the above... take the above and find what best works for you, and know that if you do then you will be 1 semester ahead of the others.. but that is only my opinion...

23
Thanks for your response! It was really helpful.  Another question for you... Do you recommend doing any sort of prep before classes start in August?   

OK someone deleted my post... hmm... good thing I saved what I wrote. Here is a repost of the information.

Thanks for your response! It was really helpful.  Another question for you... Do you recommend doing any sort of prep before classes start in August?   

First of all if you arent used to reading ALOT then you might need to rethink law school. Or get used to it really really quick.  Highlighters are your friend. Buy tons of them.

With that said, no you don't need to study anything before law school. Just method of studying.

Method of studying:
Everyone studies different ways. But let me describe to you what you are up against.

Imagine a class where they give you a textbook, and this textbook is like no other textbook you have ever seen before. 
The important thing to take notice of in this textbook is the first 10 pages which should be an outline of the textbook. The outline contains headings that guide you in what you will be taught throughout the semester. Starting the first day of class, take note of these heading and make sure you know which heading your professor is talking about that day.

You will be assigned 20-30 pages per day per class of reading to do... in this reading you will encounter about 5 cases and notes on these cases.  You will encounter said heading, and then a brief description of what the case will be about, then the case will follow... when you read the case, you will first be presented with the procedural history (Defendant appeals from a guilty verdict by trial court) this is not that important.  What is important is the arguments that each side makes upon appeal.  Look for this in the case.  And highlight or type it in your computer.
Then you will encounter the facts of the case (Def. killed wife when she told him she was cheating), this is obviously important but not as important as the arguments based on these facts.  Then the court will talk about the arguments of both sides and give a few cases that are either precedent (binding authority on the court) or persuasive authority (not binding). These precedents are important because they will give you insight as to why the court ruled they way they did. Then the court will state it's verdict. (this is obviously important). Then the court will talk about why they made this verdict... this is what I call the "rationale".  (this can include anything, ranging from legislative intent of a statute, to moral underpinnings of society, to racial tensions of that time period)... This is important to note because some professors will ask you "policy questions" on your exams, and if you have an arsenal of these "rationales" then you will do ok.

When you read a case, do not take it as the law of the land.  Read the case, note the above, but then proceed to the NOTES section right after the case... the NOTES section should tell you whether this verdict or opinion of the court is the "minority" view or the "majority" view.  Sometimes the casebook is written such that a case is presented but in the notes section, they say "almost no American jurisdictions have adopted the view of this court". I know, WTF?

You just have to pay attention and note that this "other view" exists, and on an exam be able to notice a fact pattern that presents similar facts, and argue the "other view" and also argue the "majority view".

Casebooks are full of "tests" that courts use in certain situations. Note these tests and be able to argue all of them.

Your exams are usually 1st half multiple choice and 2nd half essay. Multiple choice is easy if you know the material. But the writing gets people if you dont know what you are doing.  Learn to put your thoughts into a computer. (most important thing you can learn before law school) Because once the horserace that is lawschool starts, you will have little time to learn it. 

Your first year exams will mostly have the "racehorse" essay exam questions... this means that you will have to spot the issues, all the issues, in a convoluted fact pattern... You may think the professor is looking for an in depth analysis, but picture this.... a professor sitting there with a checklist of all the point, or issues that he thinks you should have written about... and each point or issue has 2-3 points attached to it.  If you mention the issue or point, then you are awarded that 2-3 points on the exam.. at the end of the exam, the professor adds up all of your points and compares you to the rest of the class.. if you fall in the middle you get all B's or whatever your schools curve is... if you did substantially better than the rest, then you get and A. 

I cannot tell you how to prepare for law school, but when presented with the above facts, can you devise a plan that will give you an edge?  What do you think you need to improve on to help you excel in the above circumstances?
Every individual is different, and everyone needs to improve of different things to be successful in lawschool because we are coming from different backgrounds. All I can do is try and show you what you are up against... the material is no that hard, you just have to know how the information will be presented to you.. NO ONE WILL TELL YOU THIS. This is what they mean when you hear people say that professors "play hide the ball" in class... they dont tell you what you need to know... They (the professors) just discuss the cases with you, and the different arguments presented in those cases... then the prof. might change the facts of the case a little bit "what if the wife had said that she was going to cheat on him, instead of cheated in the past tense?) Murder? or vol. manslaughter? What about under the Model Penal Code?  What does the Provocation formula say about this? What are the differing views on the provocation formula?

In your casebook, you would have read about a man that killed his wife upon her telling him that she had cheated on him , the court ruled that words cannot constitute adequate provocation to mitigate murder, to vol. manslaughter..(see, provocation formula provides a defense against murder, which reduces the sentence to vol. manslaughter)... then you will read another case where a man follows his wife to the woods, and sees her and another man enter the woods and come out of the woods 30 min. later.  Then he follows his wife to a bar, and right before entering the bar the husbands friend tells him that the wife has been cheating on him... so he goes in the bar and kills the guy that went in the woods with his wife, court rules that this IS adequate provocation.  The NOTES section of the casebook will say, when the 1st ruling was decided, words could never constitute provocation to mitigate murder, but the prevailing view includes the facts of both cases, with a minority of jurisdictions retaining the 1st cases view.

Do you get kinda what you are looking for? The professor will give you the general elements (things that will satifsy) the provocation formula, but it is your job to take down the min. an maj. view. and the elements presented in class.



Finally, all of the cases in your casebooks, and the hypotheticals given by your professors in class will only have 1 issue in them... or maybe 2.  But on your exam, your hypo will have 15 of them.  If you have not practiced on fact patterns with so many issues before, then your exam will eat you alive.  You must, must must, find fact patterns before the exam, that include multiple issues.  Then practice spotting them, and keep doing this until you are really fast fast fast at spotting them.


24
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USD v. UC Hastings
« on: March 30, 2008, 04:47:30 PM »
First of all, I can attest to the pull USD has in San Diego.  Second, with all the warm and fuzzy permeating this thread about USD law, I really need to plug my thread a little.

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,103246.30.html

If you want to see USD Law, then check it out, I took my digital video camera around the law school and campus then posted them to youtube.com. 

 

25
I am looking for 2 male roommates for the Fall semester.  If anyone is interested please let me know.  I need people that dont have any living room furniture.. I already have a full living room set, and tons of dishes and glasses.  All you need is whatever you want in your room and your bathroom.

I currently have a place, but will move if necessary.  Because I have been living in San Diego for a while now, I know where all of the safe nice affordable places are.  If you are from another state, then I can take care of your housing needs, all you have to do is move your things.  If you are interested, just let me know and we can talk about rent, and areas.. I can make suggestions of different apartments among other things. 

I want to either stay in the 3 bedroom I currently am in, or move to another 3 bedroom, or maybe a 2 bed. 

As a little incentive, if you decide to room with me, then I will give you all of my outlines, and notes :)

26
I am looking for 2 male roommates for the Fall semester.  If anyone is interested please let me know.  I need people that dont have any living room furniture.. I already have a full living room set, and tons of dishes and glasses.  All you need is whatever you want in your room and your bathroom.

I currently have a place, but will move if necessary.  Because I have been living in San Diego for a while now, I know where all of the safe nice affordable places are.  If you are from another state, then I can take care of your housing needs, all you have to do is move your things.  If you are interested, just let me know and we can talk about rent, and areas.. I can make suggestions of different apartments among other things. 

I want to either stay in the 3 bedroom I currently am in, or move to another 3 bedroom, or maybe a 2 bed. 

As a little incentive, if you decide to room with me, then I will give you all of my outlines, and notes :)




27
Hey I was wondering if you have any advice for my situation. I got into the USD evening program and was wondering what are the advantages/disadvantages of the evening program from the day program. Also how difficult would it be to transfer to the day program if I decide it would better suit me. I ask because I have the opportunity to go another school out of state that I like but full time. I would prefer to live in SD though. thanks 

Transferring to the day program is as easy as asking to do it.  I think you can even tell them once you get here and they will do it (not sure though).  I AM sure that after the first semester you can transfer for sure.  My lawyering skills class even polled the class after first semester to ask who was transferring to the day program, and about 20% of the class raised their hand. 

I like the night program, because I have time to gain legal experience in San Diego. I am already a law clerk at a firm 1L evening, there is one another law clerk from USD but he is a 2L with no prior legal experience.

If you play it right, you can graduate with 3 or more years of legal experience.  When you graduate, this may even negate a mediocre GPA. 

In reality, 1st year is very hectic, and adjusting can be hard.  Starting part-time, then transferring to day after adjusting to everything and learning how to learn in law school isnt a bad idea.

28
Do you know anything about the LGBT population/acceptance on campus??? Thanks!

Haven't noticed or payed any attention to this.. but I am sure that it is no different than any other school in SoCal.


29
If anyone has any questions about USD School of Law, San Diego, or Law School in general, or if you want me to shoot footage of something else, feel free to just ask!

Thanks for all the good responses, my thread in the "Where should I go" forum tending to do better in this category lol  :)

30
If anyone has any questions about USD School of Law, or San Diego, or Law School in general, or if you want me to shoot another video of something then feel free to ask!

Thanks for all of the good comments  ;D

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