Law School Discussion

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Messages - BlackDuck

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Studying for the LSAT / Re: Junior In College, Ready for LSAT?
« on: June 10, 2011, 11:50:42 PM »
Yes, second year of undergrad completed.

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Studying for the LSAT / Junior In College, Ready for LSAT?
« on: June 10, 2011, 08:03:34 PM »
I am a junior in College, working on a B.A. in Business Adm. Pre Law. What can I do to gradually begin getting ready for the LSAT. Any advice you can give me will help. I am serious about getting a good score.
Also, please keep it positive.


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General Off-Topic Board / Re: Music For the Brain!
« on: May 12, 2011, 11:18:24 PM »
On a more serious note, a good artist is Iraida Noriega. She is a Mexican Jazz singer.
I hope all of you can enjoy some of her music.

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General Off-Topic Board / Music For the Brain!
« on: May 10, 2011, 11:08:28 PM »
List the music you listen in the background while studying.

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General Off-Topic Board / Re: What literature do you recommend?
« on: May 07, 2011, 02:05:25 PM »
Chuck, thank you for the advice. As you can see I need to work on my writing. I greatly appreciate the advice from the forum.

Thanks.

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General Off-Topic Board / Re: What literature do you recommend?
« on: May 06, 2011, 11:44:34 AM »
Talk to my prelaw advisor, told her that I wanted to improve my writing. She said that one of the most effective ways to improve writing is through reading allot. As a result, I am now on the mission to read books daily. What books do you recommend?

Dude, seriously, it's all I can do right now not to tell you to stop doing this.

You got bad gouge from your prelaw advisor.  This is a rabbit trail that will get you nowhere.

You have 2 main missions right now:

1.  Getting into the best law school you can.
2.  Getting the best grades you can in that school.

If you do that, you'll get the best law job available.

Wasting your time on anything that doesn't contribute to #1 or 2 is a waste of time. 

Not saying that you should never waste your time, but don't waste it on things you don't want to do, in the belief that doing so will help you in your pursuit of a JD, when that's just not true.

Forget doing a bunch of reading of this, that or the other.  Focus on getting the best GPA you can get if you're in school.

Then, prepare for the LSAT.  Take some prep classes, or if you can't afford that, buy the powerscore books or some other prep books and work them so you can get the best possible score on your LSAT.

That's it.  Anything else you do won't matter one whit as far as what you should be focusing on right now.

When you aren't working on #1 and 2, relax, enjoy your time, spend it with friends, catch up with family, recharge your batteries.  Once you start law school, you won't have time for much of that anymore.
Wow! Thank for the advice. That what my pops keeps telling me. It is nice to hear it from someone else. Yet reading the WallStreet Journal does not sound like a bad idea.

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General Off-Topic Board / Re: What literature do you recommend?
« on: May 05, 2011, 08:00:47 PM »
What if I wanted to read more to increase my reading ability and vocabulary for the LSAT. Then what would you recommend? Any good novels? 

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General Off-Topic Board / Re: What literature do you recommend?
« on: May 05, 2011, 03:46:43 PM »
Legal writing is unlike anything else in the world, and reading literature will only get you farther from where you want to be. If you really want to get a sense of what it is to write like a lawyer--clearly and succinctly--go to your local courthouse and talk to one of the judges. Ask who the judge considers to be one of the best writers; there shouldn't be many. Also ask how the judge feels that lawyer's writing could improve and keep that in mind. While you're there, get as much information as you can about the real practice of law, which will likely destroy any ideas your pre-law advisor gave you about being a lawyer. Once you've gotten what you need from the judge, go to the clerk's office and request the file for one of the lawyer's cases and read everything in it. This will do two things for you: first, it will give you an idea of what good legal writing is and how it's structured; second, it will give you an idea of what lawyers really do. If you can get through that file and maintain an interest in doing that for the rest of your life, go to law school. If you only get a few pages through the complaint (the first document) before wanting to gouge your eyes out, it's time to rethink law school.

If you're just interested in how to write law school exams, FalconJimmy's advice is best.

Thanks for this advice. I am wondering if the judge will have time to talk to a undergrad student?

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General Off-Topic Board / What literature do you recommend?
« on: May 04, 2011, 10:54:48 PM »
Talk to my prelaw advisor, told her that I wanted to improve my writing. She said that one of the most effective ways to improve writing is through reading allot. As a result, I am now on the mission to read books daily. What books do you recommend?


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General Off-Topic Board / Re: Best way to Stay up late studying?
« on: May 03, 2011, 06:54:56 PM »
Thank for the advice, I will have to order that book on amazon this weekend.
 8)

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