Law School Discussion

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Messages - Anti09

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61
This conversation about how brutal the legal market is reminds me a lot of what I heard before pursuing a career in the entertainment industry. As hard as it is, the legal field is not more competitive than entertainment.  From my experience, if you cultivate your talents, work hard and know the right people, you will most likely be marketable.  Turn that frown upside down and keep hustling  ;)

Too bad the entertainment industry has nothing to do with the legal industry.  You might be able to make a comparison if you ignore the fact that a law degree puts you potentially a quarter million dollars in debt whereas the entertainment industry doesn't.

1. Entertainment industry has nothing to do with the legal industry? So all those attorneys working in entertainment, and all those 'entertainment law' journals you find in law schools do not suggest a strong connection between the two industries?

2. Pursuing a career in entertainment can put you in just as much debt, if not MORE, as a relevant program at a private undergrad can be MORE expensive than attending law school.

Lol you can't really be so dense as to ignore the difference between working in the entertainment industry and working in entertainment industry law.  You also can't be stupid enough to fail to realize that going to law school requires undergrad as a prerequisite, and therefore would incur the same amount of debt PLUS law school costs. 

Crawl back in your hole, troll.

62
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Just over it...
« on: May 29, 2012, 10:56:25 AM »
Hey there.

Yeah, sort of given up.  Checking Chapman LSN's page...don't see too many people gotten off the waitlist.  And yeah, it really sucks to be waitlisted but I can't complain too much with my numbers.  Why are law schools so obsessed with numbers?  It just doesn't seem right...the numbers don't tell the whole story.

Yeah they should really be focusing on things like your personal statement and hopes and dreams since they are more indicative of your work product

Yes.  I believe that would be a better way to review an applicant.  Not I'm just saying this simply because my numbers are not the best.  It doesn't make sense to put such a high emphasis on the LSAT and GPA.  Many schools say that they look at your entire application holistically, but I just don't feel that is the case at all.

FTFY

Schools separate candidates by numbers because raw numbers are better predictor of your performance in law school than any other variable.  Believe it or not, they do evaluate candidates holistically, but they do so after the candidate meets basic predictors of performance based on past work (GPA / LSAT).  I agree that you don't have to be a genius to get good grades, nor are they necessarily reflective of intelligence on the whole.  Know what they are reflective of?  Whether or not the student gives enough fucks to go to class, take notes, play the game, and get good grades.  If you did bad in UG or on the LSAT, you'll probably do bad in law school too, and not because you aren't smart enough of good enough - it's simply because you didn't work hard enough.  Being a lawyer is hard work bruh, law school is too, and there's no reason to believe that a candidate who couldn't cut it in UG will do any better in grad school.

63
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Duquesne Law Part Time?
« on: May 28, 2012, 11:06:06 PM »
No.

64
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Just over it...
« on: May 28, 2012, 06:09:02 PM »
Hey there.

Yeah, sort of given up.  Checking Chapman LSN's page...don't see too many people gotten off the waitlist.  And yeah, it really sucks to be waitlisted but I can't complain too much with my numbers.  Why are law schools so obsessed with numbers?  It just doesn't seem right...the numbers don't tell the whole story.

Yeah they should really be focusing on things like your personal statement and hopes and dreams since they are more indicative of your work product

65
Where should I go next fall? / Re: 3 denials 7 still out
« on: May 28, 2012, 06:06:13 PM »

I'll admit I don't know too much about CUNY.  I've heard if you want to do public interest in NYC, that's the place to go. I wouldn't call CUNY a "no one gets a job" school, like Cooley or Appalachian.

If you want PI in NYC, NYU is where you should be going, not freaking CUNY.  Its not as bad as Cooley or Appalachian but that ain't saying much.

67
Where should I go next fall? / Re: 3 denials 7 still out
« on: May 28, 2012, 12:47:09 PM »
CONGRATS!  Given that your top choice is CUNY, this is the best thing that could have happened to you! 

Think of it this way.  Would you rather (1) no debt and no job; or (2) $100K debt and no job?

68
Where should I go next fall? / Re: NY Law vs. Hofstra Law
« on: May 26, 2012, 09:16:36 PM »
How is Hofstra absolute garbage?

Because only 50% of their graduates reported employment in a LT Legal Job.  Because only 60% were able to find any job that required a JD.  Because only 7.1% of their class reported making over $75,000 per year.  And because their non-discounted cost of tuition (before interest) is a staggering $252,000.  Those are awful employment stats.  Hofstra isn't just garbage, it's expensive garbage. 

Still better than NYLS, though.

69
Law School Applications / Re: grade trend
« on: May 25, 2012, 01:21:15 PM »
If you have an extenuating circumstance that contributed to your low grades, by all means explain to them in an addendum.  If you were just lazy and didn't do well, they'll have less sympathy.  Upward grade trend obviously looks better than the alternative, but it still looks worse than someone who consistently performed throughout school.

70
Law School Applications / Re: Go to Cooley, or retake LSAT??
« on: May 25, 2012, 01:19:04 PM »
If you take the LSAT twice, most schools will either average your scores together or use the highest score. I have no idea what happens if you take it three times. You may have to wait a while before you can take it again, check with LSAC.

I would definitley advise taking a course if possible. I took kaplan and found it to be very beneficial. They had a test center in my area and I went every single day and took at least one full LSAT under actual test conditions, then analyzed my answers. Very helpful. It is expensive, however. If you do take a class you will get out of it what you put into it. Work hard, review your answers (don't just keep re-taking tests without review), and make the LSAT your single focus.

If you're not in a rush and can wait a while, I'd say take a class and re-take the LSAT. If you do decide to go to Cooley, take the time to research all aspects of the school and understand what it's going to take to succeed both in law school and afterwards. Transferring is not easy, and you really should not go to any law school that you aren't prepared to graduate from.

I hope that helped, good luck!

Law schools aren't really averaging LSATs anymore.  USNWR now only requires the top LSAT to be reported so there's no reason for them to.  NYU and a few others claim to, but there is even dispute about whether they do this in practice.  Also, Kaplan may have worked for you, but the rest of the legal world agrees that it's pretty awful.  It caters towards the lowest common denominator and teaches you boiled-down version of Testmasters strategies.  Testmasters / Powerscore / Manhattan > Princeton Review > Taking pratice LSATs yourself  > Kaplan.

OP, for the love of God, don't go to Cooley.  It's a bottom barrel TTTTrash degree mill that wont get you a job and will leave you with mountains of debt.  Retake and apply to some splitter friendly schools.

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