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Messages - Mimimimi

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41
Now look back at Brooke Shields. Because we all praised her for getting medicated, the lesson to the average person having the kind of problem I describe above is "get mom hooked up on post-partum depression drugs". That message is an absolute SIN and Brooke Shields is partly to blame for promoting such a message. The more healthy thing to do, what my wife and i did, was talk about her depression, talk about her conflicting feelings of love and hate for the baby, talk about the rising frustration that builds up throughout the day with a baby that simply cannot be consoled and that will not stop crying. But people don't want to do this because it's hard work and is confessional in nature.

Post-partum depression is a lot more serious than just contradicting emotions about one's baby. It involves real symptoms of depression for the mother, which might mean she becomes so uninvolved that she's not taking care of herself or the baby, and the mother may DO dangerous things, not just have negative feelings she get work through by talking a bit.

If people are too medicated, it's b/c the doctor inappropriately diagnosed this disease. Obviously it's already misunderstood and underestimated by members of the public.

Completely agree.  BigTex, you simply have no way of knowing whether Brooke Shields was one of those cases that "really" needed medication or not.  So why presume she didn't? 

I have been moderately to severely depressed on and off for almost 15 years, and I have previously always dealt with it through therapy.  While I wasn't as anti-med as you, I sort of felt the same way like I should be able to deal with it without resorting to that.  And I did deal with it, to a certain extent.  I was constantly sad, did not get much pleasure out of life, and cried every night, but I was able to function.  This was until I had a really severe episode during the first semester of law school.

I don't think I can fully explain how absolutely horrible it was, so I won't try here.  Suffice it to say, I finally understood why people commit suicide.  No matter how much objective evidence there is to the contrary, I felt totally worthless, totally hopeless, and like a total burden on all my loved ones.  And the physical symptoms - I went for a month sleeping not at all to a maximum of 2 hours a night.  I had absolutely no appetite and ate maybe once a day; I lost 15 pounds in 2 weeks.  I tried to do my law school reading but I would stare at the page for 20 minutes and literally not be able to understand any of it.  It was like something had taken over my brain.  Finally, I agreed to go on meds, and within 2 weeks, I was functional again.

Maybe, with an extended period of therapy I could have pulled myself out of it without meds - who knows.  But by that time, I would have flunked my entire first semester and most likely dropped out and moved home with my parents, because I simply could not function.  It makes me sad now to think of all the years I've spent feeling miserable when I did not have to.  You say that meds sap intelligence, drive, and creativity, but in my experience, depression does that.  I have done ok for myself in life, but I know I could have done more, experienced more, if this battle were not always at the forefront of my life. 

I am sure I will not convince you of anything, but I wanted to share my experience because I refuse to be dismissed as lazy, cowardly, or otherwise by people who do not understand what I've gone through.  Bradzwest is right that talk like yours is often what prevents depressed people from seeking help in the first place.  Sure, there are examples out there like Brooke Shields, but that is not what most depressed people would take to heart - they take to heart the message that says they are worthless, lazy, that they should be able to get over it on their own - that depression is a character flaw - because that is the deepest fear that they have about themselves.

Please consider yourself blessed that you are able to espouse such opinions without having to confront the real dilemma of whether you would yourself adhere to them or take the "easy" route of medication in order to preserve your sanity and all you have worked for in life.   

42
Current Law Students / Asking prof to be a reference
« on: January 11, 2006, 10:43:03 PM »
I'm trying to decide if I should ask this one prof to be a reference for me.  I got an A in the class and it was the only class I really made substantive/semi-interesting comments in.  However, the professor is the type who never remembers anyone's name, and I never went to see him in office hours.  Should I ask him or one of the profs who knows me better but I didn't do as well in their class?

43
Current Law Students / Re: Study Groups
« on: January 11, 2006, 03:25:54 PM »
I don't think it's necessary at all.  I got together with a friend and worked through some of the examples in E&E, and also talked over our answers to practice exams, and that was helpful and made the study time have a little more variety, but I don't think my grades would have been any different if I hadn't done it.

44
Current Law Students / Re: School Curve
« on: January 08, 2006, 04:38:27 PM »
Fairly tough...but at our school only 10% get the A...also a C+ median...so our curve may not be harder per se, but it is harder to get a high GPA with fewer A's to go around...

BTW what is the proper way to write "A's" - an apostrophe seems incorrect, but if you just write "As" you're equally wrong...any ideas...

'A's?  As would not be incorrect (like 1980s).  The problem is it looks like the word "as". 

45

Our curve was something like 20% C's until this year, I'm glad they changed it before I got here since I didn't pay attention to that stuff when choosing a school.  Why do they want the 1L median so much lower at your school?

It really makes no difference where your curve is set (for any purpose other than maybe making you feel good about yourself).  Potential employers aren't looking at your GPA when they compare you to similar students at other schools.  Instead they look at your class rank and the relative strength/reputation of the schools.  A 3.1 at one school may be better than a 3.5 at another.


That's a good point, although at my school, they don't release class rank unless you are applying for a clerkship or when they announce Coif, so employers will definitely look at the GPA.  Most of the OCI employers would probably have a good idea of where it put you on the curve, but smaller firms that don't hire a lot of students every year (the type of firm I want to work for) may not know anything about the curve, so the relaxed curve will be somewhat helpful. 

46
Current Law Students / Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« on: January 06, 2006, 02:31:46 PM »
It seems a lot of people complain that law school and life as an attorney involves a lot stress, long hours, and depression.  I got a decent LSAT score but I've lately been thinking I would rather be a paralegal because I can still work in law but I would also have time to do other stuff like play with my future kids, sit on the couch and drink beer, and read mystery novels, etc.

So, I'm wondering what the draw is for you current students.  Besides high salaries, what about working as a lawyer attracts you to the career despite the negatives?  A ton of people go to law school, so there must be some good things I haven't thought of yet.

If you're a paralegal, you're going to absorb all the stress of a law firm and in addition to that be sh*t on by the lawyers.  If you want to work in law, may as well go balls out unless you think you'll feel ok with forever being pretty much an assistant in your field.  I had sort of a secretarial job after college, thinking it wouldn't be so bad to just work 9-5, enjoy my outside life, etc.  Frankly, even 9-5 takes a lot out of you and I'd rather spend 60 hrs a week being a lawyer than 40 hrs a week being a paralegal.  I will admit that I am somewhat prestige-driven, though. 

But even if you aren't prestige driven, I don't think being a paralegal would be much less stressful than being a lawyer.  When the lawyers are working late, who do you think is helping them?  However, you would save yourself the law school debt, I guess.

47
I have 2 B+s so far, which I think puts me in the top half...? But I have no idea really.  I was incredibly relieved to get the B+ in contracts, because I missed a HUGE issue on the final.  However that's also annoying b/c I know that if I'd gotten that issue, I probably would have gotten an A.  Oh well. 

ChemDr... that is an excellent GPA.  I don't think anyone has rankings yet, but do you know how your law school curves?  For example, my law school does roughly 20% A's, 70% B's, and 10% C's.  I'm not sure what the +/- breakdown is but based on that curve I'd think a 3.8 would be somewhere around top 10%?  Basically, you know what the average grade is if the professor tells you or if the curve is standardized.

Wish we had your curve...ours is 10% A, 25%b-B+...they want a C+ median for the 1L class, and a B median for 2-3L...

Our curve was something like 20% C's until this year, I'm glad they changed it before I got here since I didn't pay attention to that stuff when choosing a school.  Why do they want the 1L median so much lower at your school?

48
I have 2 B+s so far, which I think puts me in the top half...? But I have no idea really.  I was incredibly relieved to get the B+ in contracts, because I missed a HUGE issue on the final.  However that's also annoying b/c I know that if I'd gotten that issue, I probably would have gotten an A.  Oh well. 

ChemDr... that is an excellent GPA.  I don't think anyone has rankings yet, but do you know how your law school curves?  For example, my law school does roughly 20% A's, 70% B's, and 10% C's.  I'm not sure what the +/- breakdown is but based on that curve I'd think a 3.8 would be somewhere around top 10%?  Basically, you know what the average grade is if the professor tells you or if the curve is standardized.

49
Current Law Students / Re: internet surfing during lectures
« on: September 23, 2005, 04:41:24 PM »
If you are going to internet surf just remember everyone behind you can see your screen!  I saw a girl in front of me google "bacterial vaginosis."   :o

50
Current Law Students / Re: Studying Time and how to spend it
« on: September 14, 2005, 10:00:31 PM »
I'm at a T1 school and we also have about 30-50 pages of reading a night.  I have been spending maybe 3 hours a day outside of class tops right now, but I imagine this will increase because now we are getting more assignments for legal writing.  I don't brief, because really I can't see how this is useful for finals.  I see how it's useful in preparing for class, but since class participation isn't graded here, I don't think it's worth the time.  I seem to be able to answer the questions profs ask anyway just from doing the reading and highlighting the relevant areas.  I think when I am studying I may go back and do "mini briefs" like just state the case, super brief fact summary, issue and holding. 

I haven't started outlining yet but will probably start soon now that we are finishing up specific topic areas.  It seems silly to me to start outlining on the first day/week of class - like at that point, how can you see the forest for the trees.  Maybe I'm wrong but doesn't your "outline" then just end up being practically all your class notes + notes on the reading?  It doesn't seem like it would be very effective to have a gazillion page outline when it comes to the final.


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