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Messages - Mimimimi

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21
Current Law Students / Re: Anon LS Dean here taking questions...
« on: January 19, 2006, 07:57:11 PM »
"Suredly" you don't expect us to believe that a law school dean can't spell "surely."

Anonymous Dean is in good company. "Suredly" is a term used in old literature and poetry, biblical writing, case law and a variety of other sources.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=suredly

22
Current Law Students / Re: Anon LS Dean here taking questions...
« on: January 19, 2006, 06:58:40 PM »
"Suredly" you don't expect us to believe that a law school dean can't spell "surely."

23
Current Law Students / Re: Research Help
« on: January 19, 2006, 05:17:16 PM »
Thanks again for the help. Yes, my professor just tossed us in the library, gave us a brief tour, and told us to start researching.

So far, I found under West's NY Digest 4th - Contracts and looked under Restrictive covenants, non-compete, etc. The topics all seem to apply to my fact pattern. I've pulled out several of these cases and read through them and they all seem to be have similar law/rules. Now what? How many rules/laws should I pull out? How do I know which one would be the leading case for NY? Arghh... I'm going crazy with this.

The most important cases to use are the ones from the highest court and most recent decisions.  Do you know how to shepardize/keycite on lexis or westlaw?  That way you can find out if a case is still good law.

24
Ok let's see if I remember Contracts from last semester...

Say A and B have a contract that should be within the SoF.  My understanding is that there is only an exception if A's partial performance has conferred some enrichment on B that it would be unjust to allow him to keep.

So, if A is going to build B's house for him and it's going to take 2 years but they have no written contract, if A has already laid the foundation and then B refuses to pay him, it would be unfair to allow B to retain that benefit at the expense of A. 

But if A has merely bought all the materials necessary to build B's house, and then B backs out of the deal, B has not actually received a benefit yet, so I believe then it would still be unenforceable. 

25
Current Law Students / Re: Research Help
« on: January 19, 2006, 07:45:56 AM »
Try using a secondary source first (like ALR).  Look up employment contracts, restrictive covenants, etc.  That will point you to the leading cases. 

26
Current Law Students / Re: Becoming an Assistant/Deputy District Attorney
« on: January 18, 2006, 08:19:42 PM »
Thanks for the advice Zemog- I appreciate it!


27
Current Law Students / Re: Becoming an Assistant/Deputy District Attorney
« on: January 18, 2006, 04:04:19 PM »
Yeah, I meant if it will help or hurt with the DA's office.  I guess what I worry about is getting into the criminal side of things and then finding out that I dislike it and not being able to do much else.  It seems like maybe you have more flexibility going corporate/civil --> criminal, but I could be wrong.  Like, I won't know if I ultimately want to work at the DA's office until I intern/extern there, but I don't want to get stuck there if I don't like it.

28
Current Law Students / Re: I don't understand the appeal of "big law"
« on: January 18, 2006, 04:01:41 PM »
i think that most of us who are in law school realize this - it's hard at this poitn to remain optimistic regarding big law when your professors are routinely reminding you of the "rigors" of big law. i think the draw still remains however, because 1) most of us will be in suffocating debt when we finish LS and we will require the big salaries (at least for a couple of years) to deal with the problem 2) biglaw is a gateway - it opens doors the things that we actually want to do (like work in-house for pfzier at 40 hours a week [those with firm experience need only apply] and 3) maybe we see it something akin to residency in medicine where you actually learn what the profession is all about. i've heard it from enough to people to know (in a general sense) that you somehow know nothing about the law by the time you finish law school - you learn the vast majority of what builds your career in your first couple years as a lawyer.

but other than that it appears to me as a dismal light at the end of a strenously dark tunnel. my neighbor, a 3L, who next year starts work for some NY big law firm, told me that he is starting to get the impression that law school is by far the best part of one's legal career (the pinnacle being the 2L summer associate summer for obvious reasons).

Yeah, I didn't mean to imply that there weren't legitimate reasons to go into biglaw other than the money - obviously it is an accomplishment to get that sort of job, and can open doors down the line in certain fields.  I think some people are realistic about biglaw and what they hope to get out of it, and some people just see it as sort of the next prize to be reached in their continuum of lifetime achievement. 

And, of course the loans are a big concern.  This is why I think that the knee-jerk advice of lots of people to "go to the best school you get into" is off.  That is great advice, if what you want to do is biglaw, or possibly super-low paying public interest where you'd get loan repayment.  But if you want to do government or a small-medium firm job where you're making 55k a year, then you're too rich for loan repayment and too poor to pay back your loans. 

29
You'll be fine.   Remember that to a large extent, law school is only as miserable as you make it. 

30
Current Law Students / Re: Becoming an Assistant/Deputy District Attorney
« on: January 18, 2006, 08:03:45 AM »
Interesting, thanks.  So would you say it is to a student's advantage or disadvantage to have private firm employment during the 1L or 2L summer?

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