Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - louiebstef

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10 11 12 ... 16
61
General Board / Re: The Da Vinci crock
« on: October 11, 2010, 08:31:50 AM »
This thread is simply "out there."

62
Non-Traditional Students / Non Trads and Judicial Clerkships
« on: October 11, 2010, 08:25:18 AM »
Does anyone know if non-trads can be at all competitive for selection as federal law clerks?  For me, that
is something so far the road that I need binoculars to see it (LS class of '15), but other non-trads may
be interested to know, too.

63
Law School Rankings / Re: University of Cincinnati?
« on: October 11, 2010, 08:16:41 AM »
TaxGuy,

The quote below gives a bit of info on the Ohio schools and their reputations within the state:


I talked to a part-time professor at Toledo (he was an OSU grad)and asked him what lawyers thought about grads from the three Ohio schools.  He told me that most employers (including those at his firm in Toledo) consider OSU=Case and Cincy to be just below them.  Granted, it's just one guy but he said when he was going to law school in the mid-90's the people who got scholarships to Case went there and if you couldn't get a scholarship to Case you would go to OSU.  I think a lot has changed since then.  I know two 2L's at Case who are both top-25% who have landed Big Law in Columbus.  Martindale lists around 1,500 Case lawyers in Cleveland so obviously a ton will stay.  There are just under 150 in Columbus vs. almost 1,700 from OSU.  I would have to imagine that you'd have a better Columbus Big Law shot from the OSU alumni in Columbus.  But if you just want to be in Columbus and don't care about Big Law and have the potential to get into OSU, then Capital might be a nice option.  You could get great money and would almost be guaranteed a 50-60k job in the suburbs.  Martindale has 1,339 lawyers from Capital in Columbus.

But as OSU is getting more difficult to get into, you could see more Case lawyers try to get into the Columbus market in the future.  In the past, Case lawyers may have gone with Case because they preferred Cleveland.  But now, OSU and Case aren't that similar in terms of acceptances.  Some people may have to settle on Case because OSU is not an option.  And Case and Cincy will become rivals as I'm sure they clearly share the Tier 2 spot for Ohio law schools in the future.  Cincy has almost the same number of lawyers in Columbus as Case on Martindale.

I continue to wonder if this will catch up to the legal market in Ohio.  It won't be too long until people realize that OSU is accepting a "higher level" (don't know how else to phrase that) applicant than Case.

The nice thing about Case is how much money they throw out.  I'm a 159/3.76 and was rejected by OSU, but offered $13,000 a year at Case while only having to maintain a 2.33.  I don't know too much about Cincinnati, but since they are public I'm sure you could go there for a lower cost than Case.  I doubt there are any serious advantages in Columbus from Case or Cincy, but if you want to be in Columbus, I'm sure that most people would agree that OSU is your best bet.  But if you have a great financial offer from either of the other two, I don't think it would hurt your chances at Columbus employment.  But I don't see why you would rule out Capital if you're only shooting for Columbus.

64
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Low gpa high lsat Best options
« on: October 11, 2010, 08:12:19 AM »
Check out the following site:
http://officialguide.lsac.org/release/OfficialGuide_Default.aspx

On the front page of the LSAC site is a calculator in which you can plug in your undergrad GPA and LSAT score.  The program will then tell you your "approximate" chances for admission to most of the ABA law schools. 


Best wishes in your quest!

65
Ummmmm...I don't know.

I wouldn't do it personally.  Let's use some basic logic here.  LSAC has no way to post and deliver photo
media to the law schools.......ergo

Law schools may not be interested in RECEIVING it.

Just some food for thought.


P.S.  I'm a retired military officer and have a handful of photos of me with a couple of Presidents.  Not relevant, IMO.

66
General Board / Re: Which type of law?
« on: October 11, 2010, 06:58:45 AM »
Not at all a bad choice.

Just speaking from my own experience, keep your grades pristine.  For the best law school opportunities, you will want to be
as close to an "A" student as possible.

If you are interested in law school, I urge you to look up the following book on Amazon and buy it:  Law School: Getting In, Getting Good, Getting the Gold by Thane Messinger. Thane is a practicing attorney who posts often here. The book will give you a bunch of information about law school, and making the legal career choice in general.  Keep participating here and read through the threads.  You will learn quite a bit.

The most important thing to glean is to make VERY sure that the law really is your calling.  It is a very costly, difficult and professionally risky choice.  BUT---if it is for you, there are many folks who will cheer you on.

Check out the following site:
http://officialguide.lsac.org/release/OfficialGuide_Default.aspx

LSAC are the folks who manage the LSAT, and act as a "middle man" in the law school admissions process.

ALSO..On the front page of the LSAC site is a calculator in which you can plug in your undergrad GPA and LSAT score.  The program will then tell you your "approximate" chances for admission to most of the ABA law schools.  Check it out.

It'll be a good reminder to crank that GPA.

Best wishes in your quest!

67
General Board / Re: Internship/Secretary/Paralegal Job
« on: October 11, 2010, 06:53:54 AM »
Not at all a bad choice.

Just speaking from my own experience, keep your grades pristine.  For the best law school opportunities, you will want to be
as close to an "A" student as possible.

If you are interested in law school, I urge you to look up the following book on Amazon and buy it:
Law School: Getting In, Getting Good, Getting the Gold by Thane Messinger. Thane is a practicing attorney who posts often here.
His book will give you a bunch of information about law school, and making the legal career choice in general.  Keep participating
here and read through the threads.  You will learn quite a bit.

The most important thing to glean is to make VERY sure that the law really is your calling.  It is a very costly, difficult and professionally risky choice.  BUT---if it is for you, there are many folks who will cheer you on.

Check out the following site:
http://officialguide.lsac.org/release/OfficialGuide_Default.aspx

LSAC are the folks who manage the LSAT, and act as a "middle man" in the law school admissions process.

ALSO..On the front page of the LSAC site is a calculator in which you can plug in your undergrad GPA and LSAT score.  The program will then tell you your "approximate" chances for admission to most of the ABA law schools.  Check it out.

It'll be a good reminder to crank that GPA.

Best wishes in your quest!

68
General Board / Re: Which type of law?
« on: October 09, 2010, 11:11:14 PM »
Since your school is accredited in general, it shouldn;t have much bearing.  As long as the institution is accredited, a bachelor degree is sufficient.

The ABA accreditation simply means that the program you attend went to the trouble to fulfill the rather exacting standards of the ABA in terms of curriculum and operation.

If you are not too far along, why not check and see if there is an ABA accredited program near you.  Here is the link:
http://www.abanet.org/legalservices/paralegals/directory/

A hint, the ABA does NOT accredit programs that are all online.  There is some minimum amount that must be "brick and mortar" classes.

69
Many state bars WILL accept you if you have practiced in California for a minimum number of years, oftentimes 5 years.
That then enables graduates of such schools as Concord to eventually practice in other states, if those states permit
reciprocity for non-ABA graduates.

I simply know that my home state, Florida, does NOT permit it.  When I considered CalBar approved schools (I used to be stationed there in the military), I did not apply because of this.

While this delayed my legal education by almost 8 years, I know it was the right choice for me.

70
General Board / Re: Internship/Secretary/Paralegal Job
« on: October 09, 2010, 10:52:04 PM »
Hey,

Don't be so alarmed. In the paralegal field, ABA accreditation is not mandatory.  The reason it is recommended is because of the quality of curriculum and high standards that the ABA requires of the school.  As long as you have a bachelor degree, most law firms will let you get your foot in the door.  You could always get a post-baccalaureate certificate in paralegal studies, too.

What I advise you to do is to complete a bachelor degree at an accredited institution.  If you are just starting out, you can take classes at a local community college. 

What state are you in?  Maybe there is an accredited program in one of your state schools..

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10 11 12 ... 16