Law School Discussion

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Messages - pacelaw2013

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31
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Class Statistics?
« on: August 14, 2010, 12:24:20 PM »
I think you misinterpreted my question. I was asking when the 2010 application pool numbers will be released (as in the 25-75 GPA/LSAT, acceptance %, ect. Not the grade curve. Also, I would rather take advice on how hard law school is by someone in it, not reading about it.

32
Short of transfering because of threat of accademic dissmissal or something along those lines it is fine. The reasons you listed are more than fine.

As for periods off...there are opportunities for an addendum. Things such as helping family or volunteering are looked highly upon. Write an addendum and explain it, but no need to worry about the time off or transfering schools, it didn't hurt Obama...alright perhaps a hot button example, but he is one that transfered and did just fine.

33
If you transferred for the right reasons, then there is no problem. Especially to an Ivy, I don't see that being much of a problem. Actually, I don't see that being a problem at all.

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General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Class Statistics?
« on: August 11, 2010, 03:58:13 PM »
Just wondering, does anybody know when to expect schools to start releasing the numbers for the incoming class. I would love to see what the incoming class profile looks like for my class and others that I got into!

35
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: Disable people have rights too
« on: August 11, 2010, 07:52:17 AM »
Are you saying being black is a disability? That is actually pretty offensive.

36
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: how gump remembered
« on: August 11, 2010, 07:50:56 AM »
Julie know nothing. What? People question Julocity?

37
Quote
How is it an unapproved JD? If it is an unaccredited schools then yes. But remember, all accrediting bodies are voluntary. From the regional to the national to the specific professional. A law school can be accredited by a regional body but still be non-ABA. I have seen J.D.'s accredited by a regional body and thus eligible for federal financial aid, but not by the ABA.  The JD is thus just as valid as a Ph.D. from the same university

Sure, I am not saying that they are not schools. I am saying they are a waste since something like 40/50 states will not allow you to sit at a bar because they are not approved by the ABA. It is not the same as having a PhD. Sure, some doors in the non-law sector are opened up, but not enough to justify the cost of having this IMO useless JD. Also, lets not kid ourselves, most of these schools are not universities in the traditional sense, they are stand alone law schools in many cases.
Sure, once and a while there are success stories, I never said it was impossible. But its exceedingly rare. If every year they graduate 200-300 people, they are bound to get a couple of local politicians (those positions aren't all that hard to obtain, I have worked on a few campaigns and its all about who you know, not your background).


Quote
A law school can be accredited by a regional body but still be non-ABA. I have seen J.D.'s accredited by a regional body and thus eligible for federal financial aid, but not by the ABA.

Ding! Ding! Ding! There is the problem. A law schools that is state-accredited will present it as if that is no big deal that its non-ABA since you can practice in one of these six states! I stated before, if you already have a job lined up in law (most likely real estate or something along those lines), have almost no chance of moving out of the state the school is in, or have some really really close friends at a firm, it is not a good investment. However, there are a lot of places that will not hire from there because A) you have NO flexibilty in where to practice, and B) They are considered substandard schools (for good reason!).

Now look, there are some very smart people that go there, I am not knocking the students of those schools. There are legitamite reasons to go to those schools. For example, my former teacher is going there in order to do minor legal consulting on the side while still working at the school. Fine, legitamite. I know someone else who wants to do real estate and handle the final paperwork, again, fine. But short of that its not a good idea (and no, politics is not a good idea since most state/local politicians aren't lawyers, most are small business owners).



38
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Americans with a J.D.

Americans with an unapproved JD is more accurate. Again, going to those schools, you need to know the risks. They close a lot of doors, because frankly, there are a lot of scam schools out there that just want your money.

Look at the former SNESL (Southern New England School of Law), their bar passage percentage was in the high 20's, last year, non-ABA approved schools went 0/11 in Georgia. They are not good schools, and are not producing many quality lawyers, which is part of the reason that they are not accredited. Knowing that, and knowing that most states do not recognize those schools it is your own fault if you go there and are held back a bit. However, if you go to a foriegn school (especially if you are not from the USA) you are attending (likely) a quality school in the other regions, and it would be blatent exclusion based on not being a US educated person.

In the end it comes to, you need to know what you are getting into. The ABA approval, is a big deal. As much as those schools try to downplay it, its a HUGE deal. Not having that, closes so many doors its rediculous.

39
For mine I should clarify, American's should not go to an American non ABA accredited school. Even if it is foriegn though, it is the right of the bar administrators to determine the merits of people who will practice. Every ABA law school admits foreign students, so how is it descrimination?

40
This cannot be entirely true because this is what led to the Georgia Supreme Court case where the girl had graduated from a non-accredited school but had an LLM from an ABA-accredited school. So there must be some ABA LLM schools that allow non-ABA students in.

What part wasn't true? The poster didn't say allLLMs exclude non-ABA students, the poster only said Florida Costal and others (others doesn't mean every other).

Evidence is still overwhelming....non-ABA schools are not worth it unless you are 100% staying in that state that the school is in, have a job lined up, and have no intention of going to other states.

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