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Messages - passaroa25

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Distance Education Law Schools / Mid-Atlantic School of Law
« on: August 02, 2010, 06:31:55 PM »
Is anyone out there studying under this school?  What is your experience?  Do you read all the cases discussed in each Gilbert's volume on Lexis or Google Scholar?

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There is a book called "A Comparison of Online Law Schools" available at Amazon.com for $8.00.  I don't know whether or not it is better than any other guide to online law schools.  The "Search Inside" feature could not reveal the Table of Contents."

213
If you can go to Novus, you might as well consider Mid Atlantic.  This non bar J.D. program is cheaper than Novus because you study only reading Gilbert's outlines.  Then, you can continue on with the LLM.  I looked for reviews on Mid Atlantic and could not find any yet.  Does anyone have any experience with this school.  You will, obviously, have to do a lot of outside case law reading on your own if you go the Mid Atlantic route.

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Before anyone practices on a federal level, he/she needs to be a member of a state bar.  The reason why online graduates can practice on a federal level is because he/she has passed the California bar exam.  Most ABA law schools do not even consider online law school work as transfer material.

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Distance Education Law Schools / Re: worst case scenario
« on: July 18, 2010, 11:34:51 PM »
I'll see what happens after I become a Registered Paralegal.  You are right.  I do prefer a J.D.  After I get a job as a paralegal for the federal government, it may be possible to go to law school part time.  Whatever you do, try to stay in the law school you are in now.  You may not get a second chance unless you take the paralegal route first. 

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Distance Education Law Schools / Re: worst case scenario
« on: July 18, 2010, 03:16:56 PM »
I accepted a scholarship from Mercer School of Law in 1987.  The catch was that I had to maintain an A average during the first year.  I only got an A in Con Law.  There was no other financial aide available at the time. 

I studied under California Southern School of Law.  I only got a 60 on the first try.  I would have passed the second time, but I didn't have enough money to pay for the FYLSX exam, flight and hotel expenses.  I live in Florida.

At Mercer we had to read 150 pages a night.  At California Southern, 50 pages a day.

Right now, I'm studying to be a paralegal online.  After I pass the NALA exam, I'll apply to be a Florida Registered Paralegal.  I plan to take the test in 2011.  To get a competitive edge, I also started writing articles on the law and post them on http://works.bepress.com.

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Distance Education Law Schools / Re: worst case scenario
« on: July 18, 2010, 02:13:24 AM »
The California Bar will evaluate your transcripts for, I think, $100.00.  If you get through 2L, I think you would be exempt from taking the FYLSX.  Then, when you sign up with an online law school and get your JD, you can take the California Bar exam.  You would also register with the California Bar as a distance learning law student.  If you leave the brick and mortar law school, some law schools will only let you even apply if you haven't flunked out.  In Florida, at least, if your credits are too low to be transferable, you will not even be eligible to apply to the law schools here.  That's what I found out.  In spite of the fact that I left law school in 1-9-8-8!!!

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You are, indeed, well positioned.

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Most of these online schools are pay as you go.  Therefore, anyone pursuing a degree or two through them would not end up with any debt.  Also, starting at $50,000 as a paralegal is not a bad annual salary.  But, you are right.  We need to make sure we are happy with just LLB and master of laws initials after our names, just in case we end up not being able to sit for a bar exam in any state

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Maybe the Master of Laws would be a viable alternative.  The worst that can happen with any of these degrees is that the holder would end up being an overqualified paralegal.  Something all of us with one or more liberal arts degrees are very familiar with.

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