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Messages - Hamilton

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11
You have a lot of growing up to do and a lot to learn son.

First, read my post above. Next, do some research. Those who make low income DON'T go into real debt. They go into income based repayment. They make as low as 0 payments each month and it builds good credit and then goes away on its own after 20 years without even having to do bankruptcy. So if you are the loser who can't get along with grown ups and gets stuck at Kmart you still come out ahead. Lower unemployment, good credit, and assuming someday you pull your head out of your ass........ a grown up job with a tie like the big boys.

You are joking right?  Why get a JD to work in a job not requiring a JD?  The guy with a JD flipping burgers is not "unempluyed?"  Maybe not for the Bureau of Labor, but from a practical standpoint of getting a fair measure of worthiness of law school education he is.  Spend $100K so you can be "employed" making $25K/year?  MADNESS to do it and madness to justify it!!!

Anyone can play silly games with statistics -- bottom line is if you get a JD you generally do it to be an attorney.  If you are not working as an attorney, you should be counted as "unemployed" when it comes to measuring the employment percentage for law school graduates.  Yes, a trifling handfull go to law school with no intention of practicing law, but that number is so inconsequential it does not register.

The 99% are 99% of the problem.

point? unemployment is lower. If that means you have to get a JD to work at BK fine. Do that or join the bread line.

12
You are joking right?  Why get a JD to work in a job not requiring a JD?  The guy with a JD flipping burgers is not "unempluyed?"  Maybe not for the Bureau of Labor, but from a practical standpoint of getting a fair measure of worthiness of law school education he is.  Spend $100K so you can be "employed" making $25K/year?  MADNESS to do it and madness to justify it!!!

Anyone can play silly games with statistics -- bottom line is if you get a JD you generally do it to be an attorney.  If you are not working as an attorney, you should be counted as "unemployed" when it comes to measuring the employment percentage for law school graduates.  Yes, a trifling handfull go to law school with no intention of practicing law, but that number is so inconsequential it does not register.

The 99% are 99% of the problem.

point? unemployment is lower. If that means you have to get a JD to work at BK fine. Do that or join the bread line.

13
Current Law Students / Re: Best Way to Learn Civ Pro?
« on: November 07, 2011, 07:57:58 AM »
I used this (Freer audio supplament) and it nailed it for me.  Believe it or not he is actually entertaining, but expalins it so it makes sense - I STILL remember his explanation for special damages using an example of a man pleading special damages b/c he got hit by a car and nerve damage gave him a permanent erection... commented that his wife would be pushing him in front of cars.  Without hesitation I would recommend that you buy this:

http://www.amazon.com/Civil-Procedure-School-Legends-Audio/dp/0314199780/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1320677587&sr=8-1

14
Where did THIS number come from?  I call BS.

Lawyers have a 1.5% unemployment rate nation wide. Rest of america closer to double digits.

Nuff said.

15
As a single mom you should be thinking seriously about the sacrifice you and your family will be making.  You will be giving up about $100K of family treasure/resources and a good 3+ years with your child/children... are you prepared for that?  I would be asking whether I REALLY need to go to law school.

16
Law School Admissions / Re: Tier 4 to Tier 1 transfer...possible?
« on: November 07, 2011, 07:43:22 AM »
I had a frient transfer from T4 to a Top 20.  Not sure where he was in placement, but had either booked every class or was within a few points of booking every class.  Not sure LSAT is so relevent when transfering b/c law school performance shows actual aptitude where LSAT is a measure of likely aptitude.

17
Current Law Students / Re: Why Law School is Still Worth It...
« on: October 17, 2011, 07:04:25 AM »
Here is something from the ABA Journal - some very interesting comments.  This is not from some scamblog (...well... I think some would define the ABA as being one, but anyway...).

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/law_school_grads_take_this_six-question_survey_on_finding_that_first_job

18
Law School Admissions / Re: 178/3.69 CHANCE ME!
« on: October 16, 2011, 07:09:26 PM »
Anyone who comes on here with a 178/3.74 asking about their chances are either flaming or being a tool.  Pull down numbers like that and not have your mind around what's going on?  Please!

19
Current Law Students / Re: Why Law School is Still Worth It...
« on: October 14, 2011, 11:39:31 AM »
Right, but why is competition keen (what a bull$h*t word) in law? as BLS states "...because of the large number of students graduating from law school each year."

As far as the KEEN competition all the jobs I listed except for nursing say job prospects will be competitive.

20
Current Law Students / Re: Why Law School is Still Worth It...
« on: October 14, 2011, 09:42:33 AM »
Spot on here except the last part.  For many it is also a horrible long-term investment.  A bad short-term investment can evolve into a bad long-term investment when one cannot make the loan payments and interest keeps accruing - the cute little kitten grows to be a ravenous lion.  Thats what the scamblggers are railing against, the fact that many are putting themselves in a financial hole that they cannot recover from, and the law school/higher ed machine are enabling and encouraging it (and this guys article is part of that encouragment).

I am behind you 100% I don't think you should go to law school for the money. I don't think you should undertake any type of educational undertaking for the money, because no job can guarantee you a lot of money. Law school is also likely one of the worst short term investments, but a great long term investment.

Interesting quote from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics on the legal profession - note the artful use of the word "keen."

"Job prospects. Competition for job openings should continue to be keen because of the large number of students graduating from law school each year. Graduates with superior academic records from highly regarded law schools will have the best job opportunities. Perhaps as a result of competition for attorney positions, lawyers are increasingly finding work in less traditional areas for which legal training is an asset, but not normally a requirement—for example, administrative, managerial, and business positions in banks, insurance firms, real estate companies, government agencies, and other organizations. Employment opportunities are expected to continue to arise in these organizations at a growing rate.

As in the past, some graduates may have to accept positions outside of their field of interest or for which they feel overqualified. Some recent law school graduates who have been unable to find permanent positions are turning to the growing number of temporary staffing firms that place attorneys in short-term jobs. This service allows companies to hire lawyers on an “as-needed” basis and permits beginning lawyers to develop practical skills."

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