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Messages - lawgirl

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191
Current Law Students / Re: Advice for New Law Students
« on: August 04, 2004, 07:33:09 AM »
When I read for class, I read it through the first time and take notes in the margins of the book. When I do my briefs on the weekend, I type out the actual briefs. If, in the assignment, there are passages in the readings that are not cases, but just textbook type information, I might take notes on that also if it a concept that I need to know better.

For example, they might have a case in criminal law talking about battery. I would read the case the first time and take notes in the margin. On the weekend, I would type out the brief of the case. After the case, they might have more notes in the text about the meaning of the case where it flushes out more information about a particular element of battery, other cases which have expanded that meanning, etc. So, on my brief or after, I might add those notes. When I study the day of class, I take out those briefs and the extra notes that accompanied the brief.

The reason to do this is when you take a law school exam, it will be rare to see a fact pattern that fits neatly into the facts of a case that you studied during the semester. If you do your briefs and do the notes afterward, often you will be covering information that will help you when you get that "new" fact pattern on a test. The BEST thing that you can do when studying a specific case is to try to think of new ways that case can be applied to a different fact situation. Try to change the facts a little bit and then see how you would apply the rule of the case you read to the new fact situation.

When I do my outline, I start with a skeleton version of the syllabus. For example: Torts is the main outline, intentional torts is the subtopic and battery is a specific tort within the class of intentional torts. Battery has several elements and each case you read will flush out the meaning of each element. You plug in your cases, notes after the cases and class notes into your outline to understand the meaning of battery as a whole and the meaning of one of its elements in particular.
My outline looks like this:
                      Torts
I. Intentional Torts
     A. Introduction
        1. Types of Intentional Torts
             a. Battery
             b. Assault
             c. Ect.
        2. More introductior information on intentional
           torts.

     B. Battery
        1. The Elements of Battery
            a. Intent to cause
            b. A harmful or offensive
            c. Contact
       2. First Element: Intent to cause
            a. First Case: Doe vs. Doe
                1. Facts (jflfsljsljlkdlfjfl;jfd;)
                2. ***This is where I put in a condensed
                   version of the combination of what
                   I found in the case, readings and
                   classroom notes

            b. Second Case: Doe vs. Doe
                1. Etc.

        3. Second Element: A Harmful or Offensive


You get the idea. The briefs are just so that you can survive in class, work out your understanding of each specific issue, etc. You later plug in your briefs, class notes, extra notes into your outline, so that by the time you are studying for the final, all you have to do is look at your outline.

That is generally what I do. If you need more help let me know.


LawGirl 





192
Current Law Students / Re: should I use a rolling bag?
« on: August 03, 2004, 07:21:01 PM »
The "too cool" ones definitely need to get over it. If they are that cool, they can carry my laptop (which is one of the heavier models, one of my books out of several assigned for class that are at least the size of the largest dictionary you have seen, my notes, the supplements, any regular stuff I might take that day, and so on, and so forth...........They can carry it for me every day and then complain to me how other people with rolly bags "look." I got over worrying about what anyone thinks a long time ago. Do what feels comfortable for you and what will not give you a back injury down the road.

193
Current Law Students / Re: Advice for New Law Students
« on: August 03, 2004, 07:16:25 PM »
Do your reading during the week, brief on the weekend and then review right before class. I can't remember how many briefs I had during 1L, but a minimum of at least 10 for each class sounds right, or even low for some classes. You will spend a lot of time in the beginning. Take that time to do it right. You can find the shortcuts later. Somewhere on this board was a question asking about first assignments. I posted my first assignments when I started. It will give you at least an idea of the length of the assignments.

194
Current Law Students / Re: Books for this fall
« on: July 30, 2004, 01:44:30 PM »
I go to the bookstore and look for the used books that have not been marked in yet. If I cannot find one that is decent, then I buy new. I can't stand seeing someone else's thought process. Check your law school's bookstore out. You should be able to find some fairly decent used books. Just try to be one of the early bird buyers so that you have the best selection. Call the bookstore, but try to be right after the previous semester's buy back and before everyone else comes in to buy for the new semester.

195
Current Law Students / Advice for New Law Students
« on: July 30, 2004, 08:02:21 AM »
Someone asked for advice for new law students on a school specific board. I re-printed it here for all of you who will start school this fall.
Good luck to all of you.



General Advice for New Law Students

1. Always keep up on your reading. Never fall behind.

2. Take good notes. If you don't do this, you might as well leave now.

3. Don't skip class, it's just stupid to spend all this money to skip class. Besides, class is where you will find out most of what you need to know for the test.

4. Do your own outlines. Look at commercial outlines if you need guidance, but do your own. You will have half of the battle won in getting a great grade if you do your own outlines.

5. Don't wait until the last minute to do your outlines. Ideally, do you outlines whenever you see a major shift in the material. You will make it much easier on yourself if you do it this way. (However, don't start outlining from day one. You will not understand how things fit together until you move to a new topic).

6. Don't ever go to class unprepared. Treat your experience in law school as if you are doing on the job training as a lawyer. You would not ever walk into court unprepared and say to the judge, "I'm sorry your Honor, I didn't do my reading last night." Don't do it in law school. Your future clients deserve better.

7. Find a balance while in law school. Go out and have fun every once in awhile or find something else to do that does not involve law school. But, find that balance. Don't end up as one of those people who are at the bottom of the class or worse, kicked out because you spent law school partying. It is such a waste.

8. Learn the cases from the perspective of the trees but study from the perspective of the forest. Be able to see the forest for the trees. If you don't understand this now, figure it out soon or ask a professor what it means. For me, it was the "secret" that led to high grades.

9. Do not study the law from the "I think it should be this way" perspective. This is the biggest mistake that many students make. See the law from both sides and analyze it from both sides. Realize that, in the law, there is no such thing as a universal truth.

10. Stop...take a deep breath...and exhale. This is one of the most wonderful experiences of your life, but it can be hell if you allow it to be. Enjoy the experience, throw yourself into it heart and soul, and embrace the process of becoming an attorney. I promise you that you will freak out, question yourself and wonder if you can do this. When that happens, stop...take a deep breath...
and exhale. Then, get up again and keep going.

Good luck to all of you

LawGirl

196
Texas Southern / Re: Words of wisdom for new law students?
« on: July 29, 2004, 09:17:34 PM »
General Advice

1. Always keep up on your reading. Never fall behind.

2. Take good notes. If you don't do this, you might as well leave now.

3. Don't skip class, it's just stupid to spend all this money to skip class. Besides, class is where you will find out most of what you need to know for the test.

4. Do your own outlines. Look at commercial outlines if you need guidance, but do your own. You will have half of the battle won in getting a great grade if you do your own outlines.

5. Don't wait until the last minute to do your outlines. Ideally, do you outlines whenever you see a major shift in the material. You will make it much easier on yourself if you do it this way. (However, don't start outlining from day one. You will not understand how things fit together until you move to a new topic).

6. Don't ever go to class unprepared. Treat your experience in law school as if you are doing on the job training as a lawyer. You would not ever walk into court unprepared and say to the judge, "I'm sorry your Honor, I didn't do my reading last night." Don't do it in law school. Your future clients deserve better.

7. Find a balance while in law school. Go out and have fun every once in awhile or find something else to do that does not involve law school. But, find that balance. Don't end up as one of those people who are at the bottom of the class or worse, kicked out because you spent law school partying. It is such a waste.

8. Learn the cases from the perspective of the trees but study from the perspective of the forest. Be able to see the forest for the trees. If you don't understand this now, figure it out soon or ask a professor what it means. For me, it was the "secret" that led to high grades.

9. Do not study the law from what "you think the law should be." This is the biggest mistake that many students make. See the law from both sides and analyze it from both sides. Realize that, in the law, there is no such thing as a universal truth.

10. Stop...take a deep breath...and exhale. This is one of the most wonderful experiences of your life, but it can be hell if you allow it to be. Enjoy the experience, throw yourself into it heart and soul, and embrace the process of becoming an attorney. I promise you that you will freak out, question yourself and wonder if you can do this. When that happens, stop...take a deep breath...
and exhale. Then, get up again and keep going.

Good luck to all of you

LawGirl

197
Transferring / Re: anyone ever transferred out of cooley?
« on: July 29, 2004, 11:42:41 AM »
defense

Check your LSD email. I replied.

198
Current Law Students / Re: First Day Assignments, Compare Notes
« on: July 29, 2004, 10:39:59 AM »
I actually still have my first assignments from when I started 4 semesters ago. This will help give you an idea of the amount of page numbers we were given

Contracts: 32 pages for the intro and then 1-10 and 20-34

Property: 3-41, 59-68, 77-79

Torts: 1-34

Criminal Law: 1-47

Intro to Law: One case to brief

199
Current Law Students / Re: anyone working during full time program
« on: July 14, 2004, 10:16:36 PM »
The attorneys are right. It is not worth it to sacrifice your grades by working if you don't have to. I decided not to work during law school (at least most of it until I get an externship). To me, the grades are much more important then a little extra money. I went from having a nice paycheck to nothing, but I figured out how to live on the budget and I make it work. I am not, however, implying that my situation is like everyone else's situation. There may be people who have to work and do not have a choice. The only thing I would suggest in that situation is to only work the minimum hours that you need to get by. Now is not the time to divide up your time if you don't need to.

200
I know that they are very wary of a bankruptcy, but it is impossible to tell you what your local bar would do. Give your local bar a call, explain what happened and see if they can give you advice. 

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