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Messages - Stuje1

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21
Where should I go next fall? / Re: BC v Wake v Tulane ($$)
« on: March 07, 2008, 01:28:34 PM »
The BC students that post on these boards seem unhappy and douchey. 

I don't know which BC posters you are talking about, but all the ones on here seem to have nothing but good things to say about BC.

I made a similar decision of BC vs Tulane (with nearly free tuition) and I choose BC and am really happy with my decision.  I think national placement should be a big factor in your decision, unless there is a particular place you want to be.

22
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Vandy Study Abroad
« on: March 02, 2008, 11:52:47 AM »
Most law schools I've talked to about study abroad programs told me that you can participate in a program not offered by your school As long as there is one ABA-approved school that offers the program, your school will let you participate through the uni that offers it. If say UCLA has a study abroad in South Africa program, Vandy will likely let you participate, since they can rest assured that the program is ABA-aproved. Unfortunately, I can't remember whether Vandy does this, but think just about every school I talked to was pretty flexible.

Just to clarify, do you mean during the summer or during the semester?  You are correct that most will let you go to any ABA approved program during the summer, but it is not necessarily true that they will during the academic year (for instances, my school won't).   They want your tuition $$$, and if you go through another school, then your home law school makes zero tuition dollars on you that semester.  Therefore some (many?) won't let you go.

So to the OP, are you talking about a summer or semester abroad? if you mean semester, check with Vandy first to see if they would actually let you go with another school's program.

23
Where should I go next fall? / Re: I hate the legal industry
« on: March 01, 2008, 01:46:33 AM »
Well it could be in the top 14 come april 1st.

It could be in the top 14 of US News, but it couldn't be a "T14" school.  The reason the "cut-off" is at 14 is because those same 14 schools that have been in the top 14 since the mid-90s.  So if UCLA suddenly broke in, it would no longer be the T14, but now the T13. 

24
You do not want to do 3L recruiting. It is meant as a "back-up," for people who did not like their 2L job, want to change cities or did poorly their 1st year and got their grades up. It should not be your planned course of action.  Firms use 3L recruiting to fill a few holes here and there, but it is only a very minimal source of their recruiting.  the great majority of their positions come from summer associateships 2L year.  To give an estimate on the numbers, a large law firm that has an incoming first year class of 70 would probably have 60-65 from their 2L class and 5-10 from 3L recruiting

You should plan spending your 2nd summer at the place/location you want to work.  So long as the market is decent, 90-99% of summer associates at big law firms will get offers to work at the firm post-graduation.   So, for large law firms, finding your job is about where you work 2nd year summer, not after your 3rd year.


Sorry to quote myself, but I found some hard #s for you on the 2L vs. 3L OCI issue that I though I would share.  From NALP (http://www.nalp.org/press/details.php?id=59)

About hiring 2L's:
"Employers issued a median of 48 and an average of 86 callback invitations to second-year students.... Well over half of callback interviews (60%) resulted in an offer, with a median of 16 offers per employer."

And now 3L recruiting:
"About 40% of survey respondents, or 211 employers, reported recruiting of third-year students not previously employed by them...The median number of callback invitations was 5...about 42% of these interviews resulted in offers"

You can see that only a small # even do 3L recruiting, and of those, much smaller callback and offer #s (note that it is even more concerning that the offer % is quite a bit lower, even with a much, much smaller # of callback interviews).   Anyway, I think a talk with your husband about your 2L summer back in Boston if you go to GW is in order  ;)

25
OP, I'd imagine that you'll want to work your 2L summer in Boston if you want to come back after you graduate, if only because that's the firm that'll be offering you a job at the end of the summer. I know that means leaving your husband in DC, but I feel like that's the sort of thing that's not super-negotiable. You don't want to do OCI as a 3L, I'm told.

I was afraid of this... why can't you do OCI as a 3L?

Do summer associateships guarantee a job post-grad?

You do not want to do 3L recruiting. It is meant as a "back-up," for people who did not like their 2L job, want to change cities or did poorly their 1st year and got their grades up. It should not be your planned course of action.  Firms use 3L recruiting to fill a few holes here and there, but it is only a very minimal source of their recruiting.  the great majority of their positions come from summer associateships 2L year.  To give an estimate on the numbers, a large law firm that has an incoming first year class of 70 would probably have 60-65 from their 2L class and 5-10 from 3L recruiting

You should plan spending your 2nd summer at the place/location you want to work.  So long as the market is decent, 90-99% of summer associates at big law firms will get offers to work at the firm post-graduation.   So, for large law firms, finding your job is about where you work 2nd year summer, not after your 3rd year.

26
Thanks, I found the same results.  Those are all the BigLaw firms in Boston pretty much, seems the small ones probably don't have the budget to travel and such to recruit.  I guess it makes sense.  I actually work at one of those firms right now as an entry-level paralegal :P

Well, it is missing a few of the major firms (WilmerHale, Choate, Skadden-Branch office), but I must say, it is a pretty good list/number of firms.  That should be re-assuring!

I, of course, would recommend BC!  ;)  If you get accepted, try negotiating some $, using your big GW scholarship as leverage.

27

What's NALP?  How do I do this search?  I've heard of it before, just not actually done this before.

NALP is a directory of legal employers.  Just go here: http://www.nalpdirectory.com/dledir_search_advanced.asp and then select the type of employer (probably law firm is what you want), then enter Boston, MA, and then select GW for "campus interviews".   That netted me 14 results (1 of which was repeated).  Fool around with that...check to see how many Boston firms go to other schools, or just do a search for interviewers at GW and see where most are from...lots of ways you can play around on NALP.  It doesn't cover every employer, but all the "big ones."

28
One thing you can do is go to NALP and check out a bunch of Boston firms and see how many of them do OCI at GW.  That should give you a pretty good idea of the school's connections to Boston.   

29
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Most competetive markets?
« on: February 26, 2008, 10:50:44 AM »
I'm talking about Boston, actually.  I'm from western Connecticut, and I really don't have any desire to live in NYC, but I want to work in a major market close to home.

Looking at where you were accepted, if you go to a school like Michigan or NW, Do relatively well there (slightly above average) and only apply to Boston, you shouldn't have any problems.  Being from the East coast, they will trust you want to come here and understand you went to the midwest because of the great law school.   Just don't apply to Boston, NYC, DC, and LA and not expect them to be concerned about whether you really want to be in Boston.   It is great proof that you want to be in Boston by being able to say "I only applied to firms in Boston"

30
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Most competetive markets?
« on: February 26, 2008, 10:19:37 AM »
What are legitimate connections?  Are "a lot of my friends from college moved here, I love the sports, and my aunt and uncle live in the area" legitimate enough if you've never actually lived in the city/state?

Depends on the city.   For NY, pretty much saying "Because it is NY" is good enough.  People there understand it is a very desirable legal market, and you don't need to prove you want to be there/stay there.   For Chicago, I found you need a reason "why Chicago," but it could be minimal.  The fact that I went to a midwestern school for UG and now have friends that live there was enough.  Boston & DC are a little stricter than that.   They want to hear that you have close family there (not your 3rd cousin once removed), you lived there in the past, you got law school in the city, etc.   These cities are more concerned with people leaving the city, and want to make sure you are going to stay (Boston laweyrs-->NYC and DC is very transient).  Besides those cities, I don't have much insight.

Also, it all depends on your grades.  If you are in the top of your class at a good school, they care less and less about your connections.   It becomes more about whether you are really interested in their city, or if it is a back up city.  In other words, they will be more concerned about how many cities you applied for jobs in, how many firms in each city, where you got offers already, etc. and less so on your ties to the area (though to some extent, since this is another factor in determining what city is the applicants true 1st choice)

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