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Messages - jollyrog

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31
Who's course did you take? If I go that route, powerscore looks pretty good.

32
To chime in from the other side, I got a 168 on my first LSAT, took the full-length Powerscore course afterwards and got a 176 on the retake. Not saying that dropping a grand is necessary, but at least for me, it was the best $1000 I spent on this whole process.

Thanks for confusing me!  ;)

All seriousness aside, my other problem (admittedly a bit OT) is my undergrad GPA. I took my last undergrad class during the Carter administration, and finished my BS (Poli Sci, SUNY Regents program) in 1990 when I was in the Navy by CLEP, GRE and work experience credit, so I've got a BS with a ton of credit earned via test and a sub 2.0 measured GPA.

On the upside, I have a 3.78 in my MS Finance I just completed. How much will ACs weigh the more recent Grad stuff over a 30 year old train wreck?

33
Studying for the LSAT / Re: A Tough Logic Game
« on: July 12, 2009, 07:20:17 PM »
How long should that have taken? Took me between 5 and 10 minutes, but I didn't observe the exact time I started. caadbecc; I think I just lost count on #7.

34
My most profuse thank you! I'll review your link and posts with great interest.

Thanks most of all for the help deciding whether or not to drop north of a grand for a course. You reinforced my suspicion; that the courses can get you from a 155 to a 165, but if you're already there, the marginal return won't be too great. And yes, I "get" the logic - I've managed to "fake it" without a technical degree as a software engineer for over a decade, but I'm actually stronger in the verbal areas; I was originally a journalism major (but writing code pays better - my mercenary instincts at work), so I'm pretty confident with the RC.

35
Thanks for the input, all. There are some fine PT programs, GULC is ranked #1 by US News, but because I live in FL, unless I want to sell my house (which me and the missus are willing to do), the best PT around here is Stetson, who doesn't seem to be all that generous with scholly dough.

One thing at a time - nail the LSAT, see what, if any, offers come and then it's time for decisions, but it's good to have some idea of what's possible.

If you hit a 170 or above, I don't suspect you'll want to stay in Florida at all, as your score will most likely travel well above the rank of UF and FSU.  Just be prepared to be as flexible as possible - something which, I know personally, can be tough when you have a family, spouse, roots, etc.


I'm aware a 170+ will likely get some attention elsewhere, which is why it's nice that I have the flexibility of no kids at home or in college, and neither of us are originally from Florida, so while it's comfortable, the roots don't run very deep.

Here's what my calculus boils down to: I'll be 55 by the time I begin practice, which means I don't exactly want to burn time working my way up the salary scale. Therefore, I'd better do well at the best school I can get into, in order to have the most opportunities upon graduation. If it means pulling up stakes, so be it.

36
Thanks for the input, all. There are some fine PT programs, GULC is ranked #1 by US News, but because I live in FL, unless I want to sell my house (which me and the missus are willing to do), the best PT around here is Stetson, who doesn't seem to be all that generous with scholly dough.

One thing at a time - nail the LSAT, see what, if any, offers come and then it's time for decisions, but it's good to have some idea of what's possible.

37
I scored a 165 in 1993, using only the Princeton Review book to study. I've seen several remarks that the tests have gotten harder.

I'm a software engineer and just completed an MS in Finance, so I think my relevant cognitive skills are as sharp as ever, but what study material would you all recommend?

I bought the last 10 exams, and I'm considering the testmasters course.

38
FWIW, I'll be 50 by the time 1L starts. You're just a kid! ;)

39
FWIW, my UG degree was in 1990, but I just finished a Masters, so that's where my prof pool is.

If I didn't have that to draw on, I'd look to managers or direct supervisors from your job who can attest to my analytical and problem-solving skills, etc. I think that's your best bet. If you actually work with lawyers, they might not be a bad choice if they can honestly address your qualifications to succeed in law school.

I agree w/the statement about GPA/LSAT being far more important. Do everything you can to rock that exam.

Hope that helps, good luck!

40
Hello all,

I'm in somewhat the same boat, but a bit further down the river, as CallerID.

By the time I start, I'll be 50. When I took the LSAT in 1993 I scored 165, but in my undergrad days I majored in Journalism, hockey and coeds, not necessarily in that order, and had the GPA to prove it. That was my undoing, as I was accepted to the T3 & 4 schools, but no scholly offers. Finances and other circumstances prevented me from going.

Now, I've been a software engineer for over a decade, got a 3.78 GPA in a MS Finance program, BUT AC's still have to look at UG GPA. Not only were my last UG grades earned during the freaking Carter administration, I CLEP-ed and GRE-d my way to my BS (Poli Sci) while I was in the Navy, so my UG GPA is basically meaningless.

Anybody have much idea, assuming I can score as well or better on the LSAT this time, how much weight an AC will put on my Grad GPA, considering it's probably a much better indicator of my chances for scholastic success than grades from 30 years ago?

Also, what chance would I have at getting some sort of scholly with a LSAT in the 170 ballpark? (I got the 165 basically cold, from reading a Princeton Review study manual in my spare time on a submarine, then took the exam when we got back to port, so I don't think it's farfetched to consider a score like that.)

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