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81


Also: it is likely that there are several non-profits in the area of your school/home that will let you volunteer there as a 0L, or a 1L.  Getting experience on your resume as soon as possible really helps.

Had to bump this for us newbies who are facing the aftermath of the Great Recession.

I intend to do exactly that too, volunteer at any law office/non-profit I can get my hands on as an 0L to get some legal experience on my resume and under my belt. Particularly if I can find one in the field I am interested in.

82
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« on: May 04, 2010, 01:50:58 PM »
Frequently Asked Questions
About Racial and Ethnic Status
 Don’t be afraid to dream about going to school—whether it be college or law school. You have as much right to be there as anyone else.

Why am I considered a minority applicant?
Law schools consider your ethnic or racial status to be whatever you indicate on your LSAT registration forms. This factor alone is not a guarantee of admission, but it helps admission committees form a more complete picture of who you are. They are interested in how your individual history has affected your life, including whatever disadvantages you may have overcome.

Is the LSAT biased against minorities?
The passages and questions on the LSAT go through a rigorous screening and pretesting process to make sure that the individual test items are not biased. The primary reason that minority test takers perform less well on the LSAT is lack of preparation. In addition, research indicates that minority group members, particularly African Americans, are more vulnerable to test anxiety than other test takers. The best way to avoid test anxiety is to prepare thoroughly for the LSAT by familiarizing yourself with the types of questions on the test and by taking disclosed (previously administered) tests. Take the entire test—not just a few sections at a time—under actual timed conditions.

more at http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-faq.asp

Those wondering what's considered a URM for law school purposes...I would guess it's the minorities they track, as shown here:

http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-min-enroll.asp

83
Minority Topics / Re: Are Native Hawaiians Considered URM?
« on: April 23, 2010, 12:49:25 PM »
URM = African American, end of discussion. Some people try to tell themselves that Latino qualifies; it doesn't.

You sure about that?

What about Native Americans? They are even more under-represented than blacks!

84
http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/10/10/051010crat_atlarge

Excellent read, and confirms around page 2 or so what some have been saying on here about what's IN you counting as to whether you make it out there in the legal world, not what school you go to (although in the article it is referring to people who get accepted or have the qualifications to get accepted to an Ivy but choose to go elsewhere, not people would wouldn't have got in by any measure even if they applied).

85
I'm retiring after 25 years.  If you have a question on essay exam-taking techniques, let me know.  I'll do my best to assist with a straight forward answer.  Please - for serious students only.

Please post your website or your state licensed in and bar number so we can check and make sure you are a real lawyer and not just someone looking to scam off other people's essay ideas.

86
Non-Traditional Students / Re: Should we really go into law?
« on: April 22, 2010, 06:09:41 PM »
I mean the consensus seems to be there are too many law schools and too many lawyers and too many graduates every year Should we consider going into the health field instead? Medical, Dental or Pharmacy school perhaps? Im 26 graduated from college 4 years ago.

As to this question...you ask "we" but then end it all about you.

There seems to every year, from my research for over one year now on what i'll be up against in my quest to get into law school, people who are going to law school cause they either have no clue what they want to do with their lives or have a bullsh*t degree that they can't parlay into an actual career.

In a bad economy going to school for a simple one-year type degree is not so bad if you want to keep your brain sharp and not look like a slacker if you are unemployed, but it should still be something you have a quantifiable or at least explainable interest in.

But i would be severely pissed off to find out a doctor who has my life in his hands is only in medicine cause no other type of grad school would accept him.  He needs to be in medicine cause he is GOOD at understanding the medical concepts and because he WANTS to take care of my health and in some cases save my LIFE! 

Yes we want to be in a field that makes money, but to be honest you can get more steady and less stressful bang for your buck being a pharmacist and investing on the side in some real estate or something.  If health care is your field.

If you're the type that gets sick being in the same zip code as someone with a cold, i wouldn't suggest a medical profession to you at all.  If you can't stand on your feet for long periods, i wouldn't suggest it either.

there are all these tiny considerations that differ from person to person...

I think you need to decide why you are wanting to do law, and whether the day to day of it is something you can live with, and whether you would even be good at it.   I don't think i would be good at medicine.  takes too long to see a return on your investment, and i sure as heck do not want to be old and on my feet all day!  No no no.  Lawyering involves standing only when it court.

(I have way more serious reasons for choosing law, but i have discussed them months ago, and never considered being a doctor anyway, but did consider turning my back on my law dreams and being a nurse...however, the hostility of the fellow nurses and the scorn of the doctors (legendary!), the slim chance of having your own practice (and needing to get ALL the way up to ARNP status and STILL need a doctor's permission to run your own business, the standing up all day even as an old woman...all that rubbed me the wrong way...law you can get your JD and pass the bar and have your own practice the same day, if you plan ahead for it...I like that. AND I can sit my old backside down when I am 80 if i don't feel like retiring.)

87
Non-Traditional Students / Re: Should we really go into law?
« on: April 22, 2010, 05:44:10 PM »
well both.


A profession surely is not the rest of your life, hence the term "non traditional". Plenty of lawyers who switch professions and v/v.


Have all of you even looked in the reality of things? There is even a section on lsd that might be helpfull:

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/board,1009.0.html

 

Nontraditional doesn't instantly mean career-changer.

It means anyone not going to law school as a single (tax status-wise), 21-25 year old, childless 1L either straight from undergrad or with a few years in between UG and 1L.

And it is usually said that once a lawyer/doctor/pharmacist/electrician/insert-trade-of-choice-here...ALWAYS that.  No one can take the skill away from you once it's earned/learned/licensed.  You may have to renew a license or whatnot, but once you know it, trained in it, done it, you are good to go no matter where or when you are in the world or in your life.

Now if you are not practicing you might not be as in demand as someone who has stayed current with the activity and not just the licensing, but even a lawyer who became a stay at home mom can be hit up by her friends for legal advice and be perfectly within the law to dish it out.

88
I am NOT in the top of my class and at over 40, I have firms offering me summer positions. I have not had to look. Then again, I am not taking any of them because I want to take summer school and finish earlier.

Your value comes with your experiences and with the assumed difficulties you will experience as an older law student. But lest you think you are ancient or something... our class average this year was at 29. We have a half dozen over 45 just in my section. the other section has someone over 60.

All job prospects are tough... may as well be doing what you want to do!


I second and third THAT!

Although of course I think it is very un-smart to give up a known and paying career that is paying your bills thus far in this economy to go into law school with no idea of what law you want to do and what it's prospects are etc.

I am not even in law school yet and I knew environmental law is a bad field.  I went around trying to offer myself for volunteer work at every lawyer's office i could find last year and an environmental lawyer let me know flatout that business is VERY slow in his field and if it wasn't for the fact that his secretary was his wife, he wouldn't even be able to afford her.  He didn't have any work, not even for a volunteer to do!

Despite how I've read that immigration lawyers are basically the poor relations of the legal profession, the one place that DID call me back eventually (cause they had nothing up front either but remembered my presence and resume/skills when I came in) was an immigration law office.  So for what it's worth, decide exactly why you want law, what form of law you want to practice, the job prospects for it coming out, and if it's your career that's truly what's not satisfying in your life or some other part of your life that is being neglected.

Environmental law seems very faddish to me.  Take my advice with a grain of salt but if it's one thing this economy should teach people, it's to get professions that endure through it ALL.  Unless you're the trumps or something.  No fads!

89
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: FAMU Law School
« on: April 22, 2010, 05:21:59 PM »
Diversity rules at FAMU Law – I’m a 1L and I have many friends attending who are single parents and hanging in and keeping up with the work. One of the best things about the school is that there are people from all over the world. In my class I have a lawyer from Checkoslovakia and another lawyer from China. There is also a local surgeon who wants to get his law degree as well as another attorney from from Florida – he didn’t graduate from an accredited law school 1st time around – although he’s been practicing for 20 years. We have students from Africa, Dominican Republic, Japan, Puerto Rico, Spain and -  Florida. The ages of the students run from 22- 60 and it makes for interesting discussions. Everyone is smart in different ways & friendly. The mix of cultures, ages, attitudes, backgrounds make the experience a blast. Be prepared – the Professors are tough – and the workload is huge. The school is determined to rise and succeed now that it has accreditation – and nothing short of performing at your highest level is acceptable – they will kick you out if you can’t perform up to their expectations. At the same time the Professors are really willing to help- they have an open door policy – if you want help you will get it – but it is up to you to ask. So if you decide to come – be ready to go all out – as 1Ls we have 6 classes this spring – it is the hardest thing I’ve ever done and the best experience ever – I’m having the time of my life.

I am glad people attending the school are having a good time, and that they are appealing to people from around the world.  I do hope they rise, and that their graduates give back by providing opportunities for internships and post-grad employment to the ones behind them.  And I can see there was a real need for folks in Orlando to have a law school accessible to them (plus, unlike many of the rest of non-Miami Florida law schools, it's actually located in a city with an international airport).  UF and FSU might be the highest ranked, but they really do not have any curb appeal being in rather racist small town locations.

I wouldn't consider it because of previous experience with FAMU's administrative side...(and not wanting to live in Orlando). 

How have you found the experience with financial aid and such?

90
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: FAMU Law School
« on: April 22, 2010, 05:16:56 PM »
I am 57 and will start in the part time program Fall 2010. I was admitted to full time, but decided not to quit my job. I am looking forward to the fun. I love that FAMU is a very diverse school. I am an old white guy married to an old black women! She thinks this is one of the best decisions I have made. I hope so!

Awww sounds like an old-school romance with a twist.

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