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Messages - xxspykex

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31
General Board / Re: Chances at a federal judicial internship?
« on: November 30, 2009, 03:51:19 AM »
I am wondering what is the best way to go about getting a federal judicial internship. From what I've seen, most students who get these have done so by referral either by their profs or through connections from their previous internships. I transferred from Cuse Law to a public law school well within the top 100. I was fortunate enough to make law review even though I have not gotten any grades at my new school. I have no idea how competitive it will be for me but I would appreciate any advice on where to start with this. THANKS

Are you looking for a federal internship this summer or a clerkship (after graduation)? The former your chances aren't too bad at assuming you get decent grades, the latter you have no shot at (no matter your grades) since you are part of c/o 2011.

32
General Board / Re: Law school only for elites??
« on: November 30, 2009, 03:43:17 AM »
I really don't think that law school is only for the "elites". I mean there are over 200 law schools in the US and, arguably, only 14 "elite" ones. That obviously means the majority of law students in the US don't go to the elite law schools. I wouldn't worry too much about the snobbish posters who only wish they were at these "elite" law schools. Most of the people who graduate from the 185 or so other law schools can certainly develop great careers as well. Last year, I heard plenty of these "nay" sayers tell me not to go to a tier 2/3 law school but, I didn't listen to them. I eventually transferred to a solid tier 2 and I am very happy.

The real issue is the outrageous costs of tuition nowadays. You essentially have to make biglaw or spend the next 20-30 years making really bad money while struggling to repay your student loans. Even TTTs nowadays cost $40K /year to attend. Yes, there are scholarships but the cost of living, books, insurance, etc for 3 years will run you around $50K. So that means to come out of law school with only moderate debt that means you need to have a full ride. For most people getting a full ride means attending a lower ranked schools (usually t2 or well below). The issue with those schools is that they almost always have GPA stipulations, which can be pretty brutal considering a lot of them curve on a B- or C+ curve. So then you are faced with the decision to attend a low ranked school with a very good likelihood your full ride will get yanked and youíll have given up attending a better school just to pay full tuition at a dump for 2 more years or to pay full price at a t14 or better (which still isnít much of a reassurance that youíll make biglaw and be able to repay your debt any time soon). LRAP and public service is also a possibility, but those jobs are pretty scarce nowadays as well (possibly more so then biglaw).

Why anyone attends most T3/4s and pays sticker is beyond me.

And public service stuff will NEVER be more scarce than big law, good economy or bad. You can find a stupid gubment job somewhere if you look, even coming out of the T4. The same cannot be said for big law.

Even paying sticker at CCN is a pretty big risk nowadays with close to half of their 2Ls empty handed this year. Public service is getting pretty scarce. There are so many people, even at CCN, that went to law school to do public interest, built up a resume that really shows that, and yet got locked out this year. I find it hard to believe t4 students are getting jobs that CCN students aren't. Pretty much all public service has serious hiring freezes this year making it tough to get these jobs that weren't really all that tough to get before.

33
General Board / Re: Law school only for elites??
« on: November 28, 2009, 08:13:17 PM »
I really don't think that law school is only for the "elites". I mean there are over 200 law schools in the US and, arguably, only 14 "elite" ones. That obviously means the majority of law students in the US don't go to the elite law schools. I wouldn't worry too much about the snobbish posters who only wish they were at these "elite" law schools. Most of the people who graduate from the 185 or so other law schools can certainly develop great careers as well. Last year, I heard plenty of these "nay" sayers tell me not to go to a tier 2/3 law school but, I didn't listen to them. I eventually transferred to a solid tier 2 and I am very happy.

The real issue is the outrageous costs of tuition nowadays. You essentially have to make biglaw or spend the next 20-30 years making really bad money while struggling to repay your student loans. Even TTTs nowadays cost $40K /year to attend. Yes, there are scholarships but the cost of living, books, insurance, etc for 3 years will run you around $50K. So that means to come out of law school with only moderate debt that means you need to have a full ride. For most people getting a full ride means attending a lower ranked schools (usually t2 or well below). The issue with those schools is that they almost always have GPA stipulations, which can be pretty brutal considering a lot of them curve on a B- or C+ curve. So then you are faced with the decision to attend a low ranked school with a very good likelihood your full ride will get yanked and youíll have given up attending a better school just to pay full tuition at a dump for 2 more years or to pay full price at a t14 or better (which still isnít much of a reassurance that youíll make biglaw and be able to repay your debt any time soon). LRAP and public service is also a possibility, but those jobs are pretty scarce nowadays as well (possibly more so then biglaw).

34
Transferring / Re: Is there a credit hour minimum to transfer?
« on: November 22, 2009, 04:24:00 AM »
Transferring from PT to FT is not as common as FT to FT, but it has been done.  I would contact the specific schools you are interested to inquire about the minimum number of credits the school will take.  Ususally there is a max. number of credits that a school will accept, roughly around 30 credits.  Good luck!

TITCR.

Unfortunately, if you want to transfer into a FT program you will probably need 28-29 credits, which may not even be possible with summer school. The only t14 I know of with a PT program you can transfer into would be GULC (and ITE it really isn't worth paying sticker anywhere outside the t14, and even GULC is extremely risky). However, if you could make the min credit requirement the summer grades being released to late shouldn't be an issue -- the school should be able to make a decision with just your first 2 semester grades (but you really need to call the schools to find out more because it all varies by school).

35
Transferring / Re: Rutgers or Seton Hall?
« on: November 19, 2009, 01:56:24 AM »
I just realized my initial post seemed a bit misleading. Im not looking to transfer in order to jump tiers. I would like to be in NJ to be closer to loved ones over the next two years. I also will be practicing in NJ and recognize the benefit of attending a school in the state where I plan on looking for employment. I realize that the two schools are comparable but was curious as to whether any current or former students would recomend one over the other and am curious as to thier reasons. I plan on scheduling tours in the spring but for now am focused on finals.


Go to NYU or Columbia. Columbia would be better.

36
General Board / Re: Law school only for elites??
« on: November 07, 2009, 04:26:53 PM »
Define "average school."  If you're talking about anything below t14 ITE, that's when you need to be worried about getting "overlooked in the job market" entirely.

FTFY.

37
General Board / Re: 146 LSAT Score , 3.2 GPA - What to do?
« on: November 05, 2009, 02:08:26 PM »
Hey,

I need some advice.  I have a 146 LSAT score; I graduate this December with a 3.2 GPA.  Its unrealistic to retake the LSAT in December to score higher; in addition, there is no test prep class near me to retake for February LSAT.  I was looking at University of Richmond, Howard University, NCCU, Washington and Lee, and William and Mary.  But how do I write a LSAT addendum?  Would that even help strengthen my application given that my GPA is still borderline?

Thanks,

Are you black? If so, and you can get into Howard, hands down go. Howard has a higher median salary then most t20s, and I think a better % of students going into federal clerkships as well (off the top of my head--check out the website). Additionally, just about every large law firm in the country goes there to do their diversity hires. Assuming you are black, I would say going to Howard for you would be better then going to just about any other school except a t14, and with your GPA you would need a pretty stellar LSAT to get into a t14.

38
General Board / Re: Transferring from Cooley...any tips?
« on: October 21, 2009, 03:24:42 AM »
OP, do you feel like a low-life schmuck when you drive through lansing and see nothing but MSU flags all over the place, just knowing that MSU is not a very good school (for law), yet is so much better then the school you chose to attend? I actually think there are MSU flags on Cooley just to cover up the bad stench that dissipates from that school over the Lansing area (which is pretty bad considering how much of a ghetto dump Lansing is).

39
Real question: why even go to Cooley? Doesn't the lifetime of debt and virtually no job prospects scare you a little (not to mention the fact that everyone will try to not laugh in your face when you tell them you went to Cooley, which will continue for the rest of your career no matter how good of a lawyer you are)? ...  Even if you go for free it seems pointless because you have literally no possibility of finding a job even as the absolute top student there (even t14 students can't find jobs this year, Cooley grads sure as *&^% aren't going to).

40
General Board / Re: OMG so many suicidal lawyers out there!
« on: October 19, 2009, 01:02:53 AM »
Lawyers who commit suicide?  Around here we call those job opportunities.

Doubtful, most of those lawyers didn't have jobs in the first place.

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