Law School Discussion

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Messages - rene_descartes

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11
3L job search / Re: Landing the interview
« on: April 02, 2010, 09:43:22 PM »
I would just start volunteering with a local judge (if money is not a problem for you, you should take any unpaid internship and get started) and do the best job you can. I think a judicial internship is a worthwhile experience.  Even unpaid internships are hard to come by these days and most of the internships also have multiple applicants.  So you just have to grab whatever opportunity that comes your way. Do not be too picky because now is not the time to be picky. My mission is to earn as much experience as I can while I am still in school. 

12
Law School Applications / Re: Physician with 3.98 161 LSAT
« on: April 01, 2010, 10:06:43 PM »
Dear Doctor,

As a former life science student turned law student, I highly recommend that you do not go to law school. I only hear about people leaving law school for med school.   You are very very accomplished already and there is no reason to go into healthcare law.  You can write and publish in the NEJM and write anything policy-related.

You do not even need to have any science background first of all to do healthcare law. My school is a well ranked school for health care law and the students in there are nowhere near as accomplished as you are and they want to do health care, and I do not think many of them were science or health majors in undergrad.   The bottom line is, what is important is how well you do in law school to get you any law job (which is rare these days). Other than a hard engineering degree or a PHD in biochemistry(which helps in IP job search), I do not think anyone's education background really helps in looking for a legal job.

That's just my opinion.

13
Acceptances / Re: IP law at Franklin Pierce v NYLS
« on: March 27, 2010, 09:55:00 PM »
I think FP. You know that FP is merging with UNH.

14
I'm currently a student at Maryland. I think it's very strange that you would pick Maryland to study international labor law because Maryland is well known for public interest law. The school has a huge emphasis on public service.  Regardless, we have great clinics including international placements.
We do have great international law faculty.

15
I agree with the above poster. With your numbers, you might be qualified for a T2 school somewhere. If you are insistent, transfer after your first year to a T1 school.  but it all depends on if you want to stay in the U.S.

Right now, the legal market is very very bad in the U.S.   

16
hey

I am a Canadian studying law in the U.S. I am a second year student attending school in the DC area.

I plan to get some work experience in the U.S. before heading back. My family is in Canada and eventually i want to settle in Canada because i have been travelling in the states for so long and going to school here, I've decided that I want to move back eventually.

If you study in the U.S, you have one year of OPT (optional practicl training) after graduation and then you can get any work experience; and after that you can think about moving back. But yeah, you and I will both have to go take one year of classes to fill in the missing gaps. With the economy the way it is right now in the U.S, i seriously think about moving back home.   

As a Canadian, i'm not qualified for a lot of jobs here. In a way, we are considered second-class citizens here unless one of your parents is American and you have dual-citizenship (which many Canadians do if they are in the US).

Regardless, I've had a great education so far and met and seen a lot of things and people that I would never have had the opportunity to see in Canada.

If you have any questions, feel free to email me.   

17
St. Marys / Re: About St. Mary's: Read This
« on: January 17, 2010, 05:51:27 PM »
Many law schools across the country meet these four criteria. My school for example has top notch faculty (great scholarship, featured on TV etc.); five law journals; we are also public service oriented school with great clinics and a national level moot court team, and countless internship opportunities.  My school is a top 100 school by US news rankings. However, the people with great job offers are those ranked in the top 10% and with the economy the way it is right now, it is unlikely the employer will dip further into the class.  Many schools advertise themselves based on the top 10% of the class (chances are, if you are in the top 10% of any law school in the country, you are likely to do better than somebody in the top 50% with exceptions of course. I'm just giving a general picture). This is a gross distortion.  The OP fails to see this and distorts the careers prospects picture for an average law student from a non-elite law school.  I feel that outside of HYSC, the life of an average law student is just that much harder in terms of landing a well paying employment right out of law school. Of course there are many many exceptions. Law is very elitist. And that's just something law schools must make clear to the incoming students.     

18
Transferring / Transfer students and OCI
« on: August 16, 2009, 01:04:21 PM »
Hi everyone

Thanks for being helpful on this board. If you are a transfer student (for class of 2011), how has your experience been like with the Fall OCI? I transferred to a public law school ranked between 40-43. I figured my job prospects at a nationally recognized public law school would be better than at my T3 school with an IP focus. As a transfer student, things have not been easy for me.  I missed a bunch of Fall OCI deadlines and my best shot is through resume-collection rounds. My school is part of the NLSC (national law school consortium) and the chicago and san francisco interview programs are both cancelled. It's quite a bummer as there are very few firms showing up this year at both OCI and these interview programs. There are people who told me I am in a very bad position as a transfer student and that I didn't make enough of a jump from T3 to the 40's.

I have been writing targeted cover letters to the various firms I'm interested in so I have also been directly targetting firms on my own. Another thing I should tell you is I am an IP person and I'm more interested in IP boutique firms than in large firms. Many of these boutique firms do not interview on campus anyway. By directly targeting firms on my own, can someone tell me if I'm on the right track? What advice will you offer me? I would like to hear some helpful advice.

19
Transferring / Transfer student's resume
« on: July 22, 2009, 05:20:50 PM »
how would a transfer student explain to employers that they've transferred on the resume?
Do you list both schools? Because it seems odd that you list your first year GPA next to the name of your new law school (obvivously you have not earned those grades there)
Can somebody please explain how I can re write my resume? Many things have changed since I learned about my interview, which will take place next week. Thanks

20
Transferring / Re: Maryland Law
« on: July 22, 2009, 02:12:28 PM »
i'm actually quite surprised by my acceptance to MD. I didn't think I stood a chance. Up until yesterday, I was ready to go to Chicago-Kent and I started looking for housing in Chicago.The other schools i applied were DePaul, CK, Case Western (which I never heard from. I want to eventually practice patent law. MD is in a great location for that. I'm transferring from a T3 IP school. I'm just happy I got in. 

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