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Messages - gzl

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   I will be finishing up my last two years of undergrad work next fall. Now the time to choose a major and minor have come up. I will be majoring is psychology but I am wondering what minor I should choose.

   My first choice is Criminal justice, I feel that this might help me if I decide to do prosecutorial work and will probably increase my GPA. But, I have heard that Anything that I learn in Criminal Justice I will learn in law school and it won't help me score high on my LSAT.

   The second choice is philosophy. This will help me in logical reasoning benefiting my LSAT score, but could lower my GPA.

So... What would be the most beneficial choice:  Criminal Justice or Philosophy ?   


http://www.ivc.edu/econ/pages/lsatscores.aspx

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I'm not flaming.  I don't see the issue with detention and torture, so long as it's done in rational state interest, and I don't see why it wouldn't be.  I realize that these aren't the greatest ways to extract information, but I assume that state actors are smart, and they know better than me when it's necessary to detain someone without habeas corpus.

I went to an ACLU talk today and the former Reinhardt clerk seemed to presume that "torture is bad, hence torture must be stopped," but I didn't have the guts to ask him why.


"Rational State interest" is a murky phrase, at best.  In the case of the United States, any short-term state interest is out-weighed, imao,  by the fact that we cease to be a state defined by laws and commitment to the rule of law when we engage in torture and extra-legal detention.  The effectiveness of torture isn't even really an issue in my view.  Even at 100% effectiveness, torture contradicts our own laws and the principles that they strive to embody, and we cease to be the U.S. when we engage in it.

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   I will be finishing up my last two years of undergrad work next fall. Now the time to choose a major and minor have come up. I will be majoring is psychology but I am wondering what minor I should choose.

   My first choice is Criminal justice, I feel that this might help me if I decide to do prosecutorial work and will probably increase my GPA. But, I have heard that Anything that I learn in Criminal Justice I will learn in law school and it won't help me score high on my LSAT.

   The second choice is philosophy. This will help me in logical reasoning benefiting my LSAT score, but could lower my GPA.

So... What would be the most beneficial choice:  Criminal Justice or Philosophy ?   


Crim Jus. won't do much good, to be honest.  I don't know where I saw the stats, but there was a breakdown somewhere on average LSAT scores by major, the top three were Economics, Philosophy and Physics (poli sci and cj were actually low on the breakdown).  I was a philosophy major, and the training in reasoning/critical thinking/counting angels on the head of a pin   was of huge benefit on the LSAT.

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Studying for the LSAT / Re: What about the writing portion?
« on: May 04, 2009, 03:10:33 PM »
I have a couple questions about the writing portion of the LSAT.  I realize it is "unscored", which from what I can tell means it doesn't factor into your numerical score, but it gets evaluated in some way, right?  Maybe not, I just don't know.  Do adcomms have access to it, or LSAC's evaluation thereof?  All the prep material I read basically said don't worry about it, but since I've been out of school so long, I'm thinking I really need to retrain myself in writing an essay.

Admissions departments do have access to the LSAT essay.  I have yet to hear of even one case though where it was a factor one way or another.  Retraining yourself to write an essay may be a good idea, but I'd put much more effort into the personal statement than into worrying about the LSAT essay. If you're ever in a position that an essay is going to make a difference between yourself and another candidate, the personal statement is going to make a much larger difference than some lame essay about whether a retirement community should choose trip a or trip b for their geriatric get-away.

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