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Messages - LawDog3

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11
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: African American Female
« on: May 06, 2009, 02:48:40 AM »
I agree with "Ninja1" and "That One", you are going to need to apply early and try to get a LSAT score of 160. I also graduated with a 3.0 gpa and scored a 155 on my LSAT, and i can tell you it really is a struggle.don't forget that your LSAC gpa might have you dropping about .3 points bringing you down to about a 2.7gpa. APPLY EARLY AND AIM FOR 160+.

So my advice of 165 doesn't cover it? 

12
I don't know why torture bothers people, but i rather enjoy it...yeah, I'm into the kinky thing. I love bondage, chains, whips, you name it. ;D

This is wrong.

I know...it's...so wrong...lol. But I never saw SueB's post, so mine is an orig. U dig?

13
I don't know why torture bothers people, but I rather enjoy it...yeah, spank me hard! I'm into the kinky thing. I love bondage, chains, whips, you name it. ;D

14
General Board / Re: Law Schools To Avoid At All Costs!
« on: May 06, 2009, 02:28:17 AM »
To the Tier 1-3 students who are so insecure about themselves as to come onto a board and attempt to belittle what others have worked hard to achieve: Enjoy loneliness.  You will not be successful with that attitude, I assure you.  Your personality wins over people, NOT your LSAT, GPA, class rank, etc.  These mean absolutely zero in the end.  What matters is your passion, passing of the Bar, and treatment of others (clients, employees alike).  Its sad to see so many that have the opportunity to go these great institutions waste it with their attitude and lack or respect for their future fellow attorney.  Some of you are in school to defend invalids and people who did not have the learning capacity to even attend college, and here you are lashing out at someone for sitting at a tier 4 law school.  I wish that these few would consider themselves privileged rather than immortal.  I also recommend changing your attitude, otherwise you may find yourself the one working for that tier 4 grad that so graciously appreciated his/her opportunities. 

I do agree with this. LSAT and career potential do not correlate. T4 schools are geared towards working adults, second career adults, cops, entertainers, and people who may not need to practice law as a career, but use law in the course of their careers. And the streets are littered with Harvard grads who thought their shyt didn't stink. lol.

But, you know who's really stupid? Hill Harper! He went to Harvard Law so he could become a Hollywood actor and "know how to read contracts and act as his own lawyer". He could have gone to Cal Western for that. On second thought, I'm sure Harvard is paid for with his million$ from tv and movies, and he can still go be a BigLawyer if he so chooses. I guess he's not THAT dumb. lol.

T4s aren't geared towards working adults, etc., they're geared towards people with bad LSATs and GPAs to match. That's why virtually every T4 and a good chunk of the T3 is a 2 1/2 - 3 year bar prep course.

Ok...working adults with suck-ass LSAT's and grades then...lol.

15
General Board / Re: Law Schools To Avoid At All Costs!
« on: May 06, 2009, 12:38:12 AM »

I don't know what this dumbass' problem is, but I know people who attended non-ABA accredited law schools in AL and CA who are making six figures. 


yea right ..

It's possible. Maybe they didn't get a BigLaw job on Wall Street right out of school, but if they worked hard enough and built a nice clientele, and/or used their business skills, they might be doing it. And people forget, T14 grads (and those from a few other schools) have the monopoly on grad-level or law school academia jobs, but every other law grad can realistically teach undergrad at a major university and make $70K-$100K+. And there are folks who do that. If you're able to do something else on the side, there's your six figures.   

16
General Board / Re: Law Schools To Avoid At All Costs!
« on: May 06, 2009, 12:16:40 AM »
To the Tier 1-3 students who are so insecure about themselves as to come onto a board and attempt to belittle what others have worked hard to achieve: Enjoy loneliness.  You will not be successful with that attitude, I assure you.  Your personality wins over people, NOT your LSAT, GPA, class rank, etc.  These mean absolutely zero in the end.  What matters is your passion, passing of the Bar, and treatment of others (clients, employees alike).  Its sad to see so many that have the opportunity to go these great institutions waste it with their attitude and lack or respect for their future fellow attorney.  Some of you are in school to defend invalids and people who did not have the learning capacity to even attend college, and here you are lashing out at someone for sitting at a tier 4 law school.  I wish that these few would consider themselves privileged rather than immortal.  I also recommend changing your attitude, otherwise you may find yourself the one working for that tier 4 grad that so graciously appreciated his/her opportunities. 

I do agree with this. LSAT and career potential do not correlate. T4 schools are geared towards working adults, second career adults, cops, entertainers, and people who may not need to practice law as a career, but use law in the course of their careers. And the streets are littered with Harvard grads who thought their shyt didn't stink. lol.

But, you know who's really stupid? Hill Harper! He went to Harvard Law so he could become a Hollywood actor and "know how to read contracts and act as his own lawyer". He could have gone to Cal Western for that. On second thought, I'm sure Harvard is paid for with his million$ from tv and movies, and he can still go be a BigLawyer if he so chooses. I guess he's not THAT dumb. lol.

17
General Board / Re: Law Schools To Avoid At All Costs!
« on: May 05, 2009, 11:52:42 PM »
You forgot Florida A & M, aka FAMU. I disagree on Golden Gate.

18
Did you make a decision on the school?

19
Whether you like Iowa or not depends on style and choice. So everyone's perceptions of quality of life are "correct".

As far as whether Iowa is national, that's a tricky question that depends on definition. Some people define it by a school's applicant pool. Three other groups might be career placement related to 1) BigLaw firms, 2) clerkships, or 3) geographical placement, in combination with at least one of the former.

Still, a fifth group might say it's defined by "reputation", which gets muddied by the reputations of the universities and colleges overall, their research and scholarly writings, histories, and public perception, which make things more difficult to assess.

I think all five could be correct, but the debate begins and ends with how much weight to give to the five metrics.

A school like Cornell may look "national" when putting reputation first, followed by applicant pool, but how national is it when considering that most Cornell grads stay in the northeast?

The Cali-4 are also great examples of this dynamic b/c people don't generally want to leave Cali. Is that to say that Vanderbilt is more "national" than Stanford or Berkeley? According to geographic placement, it might be. But in terms of reputation, the story changes.

I had this conversation with some Tulane thread posters. Tulane and WUSTL which are somewhat like Iowa in that few people actually want to stay in those respective markets after graduation. The real question is: "What defines 'national'?"

20
Law School Applications / Re: does late waitlist=early admit?
« on: May 05, 2009, 08:31:22 PM »
Thanks for the replies, all.

I did ok on the test, so probably wouldnt improve that much, and probably won't bother. Guess i'm'a skip it this year, and try again. _really_ want that preferred school.


You have five months to prepare for October! Go for it. Work hard. You can do it. Sometimes it's enough to show the adcoms that you are trying to improve and that you really want to go. Think long and hard about waiting b/c you're still "warm" right now. It might be easier for you to improve your LSAT score now than after you've taken a year off. On the other hand, LSAC does have that three-in-two rule, so you don't want to use up your eligibility. Think it over. But consider that five months is enough time for a 10-15 point jump. People have done it.

Yeah, the OP should at the very least consider it.  While I didn't jump 10-15 points, it was close to that.  (At the same time, the statistics show that this is fairly rare.  So the OP should see if he can improve his study techniques, etc.)

Yup. I can suggest some materials that would be a big help. My first official test was 145 (nerves and lack of concentration, alone, probably cost me 8-10 points). I now have a 163...an 18 point jump. And, even though I am already admitted to some top-notch schools, I am re-taking it next month to see if I can bring it up another five points or so.

Try some of these suggestions:

A) The Elements of Style, Strunk and White ($20). Your grammar and sentence structure will immediately improve

B) How to Get into the Top Law Schools, Richard Montauk ($25)


Get the following prep books/matrerials:

1) PowerScore Logic Games Bible ($40 new, Amazon.com)

2) PowerScore Logical Reasining Bible ($40 new, Amazon.com)

3) PowerScore Reading Comprehension Bible ($40 new, Amazon.com)

4) All Three Next 10 LSAT's ($20 each new, Books are Green, Purple and Red, Blue and Gold, Order at LSAC Website or Amazon.com)

5) McGraw Hills LSAT ($20 Barnes and Noble) Note: Good for Logic Games only, especially diagramming...the best!

6) LSAC SuperPrep (free through LCAS Law Services if you are approved for a fee waiver, otherwise, $20)

7) Kaplan Advanced (Use this during your final month of prep)

In addition, go to the LSAC website and Order tests #42-56. Take your proctored tests with these rather than the books b/c they physically resemble the real exams.

Read the Scientific American Magazine Regularly
Read the Wall Street Journal Regularly
Read The Smithsonian Magazine Regularly

Put in four-five hours per day every day, at least early on. Take at least three timed exams per week during your final two months of prep.

Start slowly. Lead off by reading the PowerScore books and doing all exercises thoroughly, studying the explanations. Begin with the Reading Comprehension Bible for three weeks. Everything on the LSAT, including LG rules, revolves around "comprehension". Read and re-read; repeat the lessons and study daily. Reading Comp is your foundation for the whole test.

The next two weeks do the Logical Reasoning Bible. Then in your final two weeks read the Logic Games Bible. Follow the approaches to the questions, but use the McGraw Hills Book to learn the most efficient diagramming techniques. Again...DO ALL EXERCISES and read all explanations. Note which questions give you the most trouble and devote extra time to them. Always concentrate on your weaknesses, not your strengths


Begin using your SuperPrep Book after about a month...read it at night for 15-20 minutes before bed and in the morning. Read the explanations for the answers. You will start to notice the subtle patterns in the wrong answers. For example, in necessary assumption questions, the wrong answers often have ambiguous words in them, such as most, some, many, often, etc. And you know how to use the reversal/negation test, I am sure. Learn to spot wrong answers quickly. There's almost always a single word that gives it away. And you can use negation in "inference" questions, as well. 

During your third month, begin doing the Next-10 and start timing yourself. Learn pacing. Take advantage of the fact that you don't have to do questions in order. In LR, the questions generally get more difficult towards the end of the section (last 5-6 questions), but not always. in the other sections, you should scan the section and go for what looks attractive, but be wary of the fact that the test-makers will trick you with passages that look easy until the second paragraph, and vice versa.

Set aside a day for "Lab", where you work only on one section (LG, RC or LR) for that day (4-5 hours). Remember to work on your weaknesses more than you work on your strengths. That might seem redundant, but you'd be surprized; it takes discipline to do that.

Develop a schedule and stick to it. Don't worry about speed early on...worry about understanding the question types and how to approach them. Speed will come.

I promise you that buying the materials I recommended above will help you. I might have improved more had I worked on the LSAT for longer than 2.5 months last year.

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