Law School Discussion

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Topics - LawDog3

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1
Where should I go next fall? / Goodbye from LawDog!
« on: May 07, 2009, 08:55:08 PM »
It has been really fun people, but I gotta go. I have too much to do over the next month, including moving to the east coast, prepping for the LSAT (doing so to get more $$ and get off waitlist at many people's dream school), getting ready for my internship in NY, and doing Law Preview...normal stuff I guess.

bl825, get your stuff together. I will probably wind up creaming you in court some day... ;) ;D

2
Non-Traditional Students / Is it my imagination?
« on: April 24, 2009, 03:49:32 AM »
...or is there a dearth of older Black and Hispanic students (especially males) at the very top law schools? How many Black or Hispanic men over 45 study law at one of the so-called T14's? I've seen older white men and women, but no Blacks or Hispanics over 45..

3
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Time for "T18"?
« on: April 24, 2009, 02:26:28 AM »
Texas, Vandy, UCLA, and USC have held spots 15-18 for several years now, while the 19th and 20th spots have been more prone to change - BU, GWU, Minnesota, WUSTL, etc. have held those spots.

Is their relative dominance good enough to make the case for an expansion of the highly arbitrary, and very elitist, "T14" group?

How would this effect the rankings from 10-14? Does the scholarship at these schools merit a change? Do you think USNWR would be less resistant to moving Cornell, Duke, Georgetown and others down?

What's Bob Morse's motivation for such a classification and resistance for change?

And, does USNWR perpetuate this myth, or do we?

4
General Off-Topic Board / Who's Got a good Law/Politics Joke
« on: April 20, 2009, 03:12:39 AM »
Q. What does Michell Obama ask Barrack every night before bed?

5
Law School Applications / Waitlisted in multiple years
« on: April 07, 2009, 12:53:16 AM »
I was in my former LSAT instructor's office today and listened to a girl who has been waitlisted multiple times by three schools: Duke, Vanderbilt and Michigan, twice each. These schools obviously felt she would be a good addition to their schools or they would not have waitlisted her.

My LSAT instructor believes that any applicant waitlisted in two consecutive seasons at a school should be guaranteed a seat in the following year's class, but without an institutional scholarship, just to add some disincentive for waiting rather than accepting another school's offer in the current year's cycle.

I suspect that waitlisting in multiple years at the same school(s) is rare enough that few applicants would actually be in position (or inclined to) take advantage of the guarantee.

Does anyone here agree/disagree? Has anyone here had that experience? Do you believe this would be good policy? And what effect, if any, would such a policy have on schools?

7
Affirmative Action / Anyone Heard of Academic Initiative Action (AIA)?
« on: March 29, 2009, 04:32:35 PM »
Affirmative Action really exists for everyone, if you think about it. Legacies for the rich. Ethnicity considerations for exceptional URM's. Geographic considerations for talented out-of-state applicants. And then there are the "Academic Initiatives".

UCLA and NYU are among the first elite schools to use it, but it's a great substitute for AA b/c it includes EVERYONE!

UCLA's Critical Race Studies option gives applicants a huge bump in their chances for admission at UCLA Law b/c of UCLA's mission of training lawyers who are A) sensitive to society's race issues and B) intent on using that knowledge to address racial problems in the legal and business fields, as well as in their communities.

Schools that steer students into public interest fields, offering scholarship/fellowship incentives (like NYU Law), and offer binding scholarships on their basis, are also practicing AIA.

So...if white students would like to benefit from theior own form of AA, these options are available and have been for a long time. The only thing you must be wary of is that, professing a specific academic interest means a a real commitment, so don't lie. You may get called on it if you gain admission but don't follow the script. And schools like NYU will yank your scholarships and/or expell you.
 
This all goes to say that...nobody should be griping about Affirmative Action. If it exists for everyone, then, somewhat paradoxically, it really doesn't exist at all.

8
Affirmative Action really exists for everyone, if you think about it. Legacies for the rich. Ethnicity considerations for exceptional URM's. Geographic considerations for talented out-of-state applicants. And then there are the "Academic Initiatives".

UCLA and NYU are among the first elite schools to use it, but it's a great substitute for AA b/c it includes EVERYONE!

UCLA's Critical Race Studies option gives applicants a huge bump in their chances for admission at UCLA Law b/c of UCLA's mission of training lawyers who are A) sensitive to society's race issues and B) intent on using that knowledge to address racial problems in the legal and business fields, as well as in their communities.

Schools that steer students into public interest fields, offering scholarship/fellowship incentives (like NYU Law), and offer binding scholarships on their basis, are also practicing AIA.

So...if white students would like to benefit from theior own form of AA, these options are available and have been for a long time. The only thing you must be wary of is that, professing a specific academic interest means a a real commitment, so don't lie. You may get called on it if you gain admission but don't follow the script. And schools like NYU will yank your scholarships and/or expell you.
 
This all goes to say that...nobody should be griping about Affirmative Action. If it exists for everyone, then, somewhat paradoxically, it really doesn't exist at all.

9
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Are Law Schools Committing "Fraud"
« on: March 21, 2009, 04:34:27 AM »
And, if so, why are we letting them get away with it? Why do we allow law schools to lie to prospective students and enrollees by fudging their statistics? Is this not fraud or false advertising? Isn't a school implicitly promising certain levels, qualities and types of opportunities that will inevitably not come to fruition for some students, even if they do perform well? Shouldn't we sue?

Applicants discovered lying or fudging any aspect of their profiles for the benefit of gaining admission are subject to recision of their school admission(s), scholarships and grants, diplomas and bar admission(s), not to mention the forfeiture of any tendered monies to the schools. However, Schools that lure promising students with fake numbers face NO PENALTIES.

My question is this: if students or graduates discover schools falsifying their stats, should they not be allowed to seek recovery of at least a percentage of their money? After all, the students have been falsely induced to the schools and might have made other choices with more accurate information, and this can diminish the value of a school's diploma. What's good for the goose, should be good for the gander, right?

10
For example...do they get your actual employment files? What if you live in a state that prohibits those files or the information contained therein from being released? Do they go into your financial aid records? Probably. Taxes? Maybe. But I am curious about the employment thing because I have quit a couple of jobs under less than ideal circumstances, and listed them as "voluntary terminations". I also have a few "mutual terminations".

I understand that leaving a job in lieu of "involuntary termination" might still be seen as involuntary termination, but, wouldn't the BAR have to prove that you knew you were about to be terminated? And no company I have ever worked for will give any information besides, name rank and serial number, essentially (pay, dates, etc). Do state BAR's subpoena additional info? 

Most of my schools didn't really delve too deeply into employment, but a few ask about involuntary discharges in their character-fitness sections. I applied to one: Irvine. And I told them about the involuntary terminations, and explained the "mutual terminations".

Another asks about leaving employment "under anything but honorable" conditions (Maryland). I didn't apply there, but I am curious. Does the application want to know about theft or something, or is it concerned with ANY type of negative circumstance?

For the record, I have erred on the side of disclosure, but I am curious about the State BAR's and how far they go.

Thanks in advance.

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