Law School Discussion

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Messages - AlisaGreenstein

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41
Law School Applications / Re: Advice Wanted on Waiting for LSAT Score?!
« on: December 18, 2008, 03:50:04 PM »
You can definitely work on getting recommendations and drafting/editing personal statements during this stressful time (hang in there!) But you might also take this opportunity to do some more in-depth research into the schools you are possibly interested in. Although most classes are over, you can contact the Career Planning and Placement offices at the schools you are interested in and obtain information on where most graduates work, where they get accepted and what type of recruiting programs they offer.  This will give you a better idea of whether the school is a good fit for you.  You can also feel free to give yourself a break and relax a little during the holidays - once you get your score, you will be in a better position to determine your plan of attack.

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

42
Personal Statement / Re: Personal Statement about Career Switch
« on: December 18, 2008, 03:42:52 PM »
Your personal statement would be an excellent opportunity for you to convey why it was that you decided to switch careers.  More importantly, I think you could use the personal statement to show why your work experience has made you better prepared and a better candidate for law school.  You can provide examples of specific experiences that have improved your abilities to think analytically and provide quick resolutions to client issues.  This should be great material with which to work.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

43
I would include a brief addendum to your application where you include a short explanation of your illness and how it affected your performance. I will try to emphasize as much as possible that you have recovered and your performance has improved as a result.  Hope you are feeling better!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

44
Personal Statement / Re: Quick Question
« on: December 18, 2008, 03:35:38 PM »
Although it is probably a good idea to briefly include the school name somehwere, what is more important than including the school name is making it clear to the school why you would be an excellent candidate for their school and why it is that you want to go to their school.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

45
Personal Statement / Re: Please take a look at my LSAT addendum
« on: December 18, 2008, 03:33:11 PM »
Your application is an opportunity for you to make the best first impression you can.  As a result, it is always a good idea to focus on the positive, rather than the negative.  That's why I would recommend starting off with something like "I would like to take this opportunity to highlight the improvement in my performance between ___ and ___. Although I started off with ___, I was able to really improve my score with a lot of hard work and effort.  I am confident that I will have even greater success upon admittance to ___ law school."  (or something to that effect). That way, you are downplaying the fact that you might have done badly and trying to focus their attention on what you did do well.  Good luck! 

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

46
Financial Aid / Re: Couple financial aid q's
« on: December 18, 2008, 12:43:29 PM »
1) No they do not cover the cost of relocation.
2) If you don't get a job, you might want to consider cutting back on other miscellaneous living expenses or looking for other scholarships.  If you go to a local library or bookstore, there is typically a book which offers a variety of different need-based and merit-based scholarships for graduate school and they might have some leads for you.  If all else fails, consider approaching the law school and seeing if you can work out some work/study program.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

47
Law School Applications / Re: good safetys needed
« on: December 14, 2008, 06:02:30 PM »
I would say that it would depend on what region you are looking for.  In the metro NY area, with those scores, Rutgers and Seton Hall might be good schools for you.  But - you should always make sure that there are schools you WOULD feel comfortable attending.  School is out in most places now but go visit their career planning centers and get statistics on where students go on graduation and see if that fits with your career goals.  Then, come the end of January, sit on a class and see if it is a place where you would be happy for three years!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law 

48
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Advice heading into Feb 09 LSAT!
« on: December 12, 2008, 10:45:19 AM »
Your age should not be a concern or an obstacle to studying for the LSAT.  In fact, your years of experience may be a benefit to your preparation. I would suggest signing up for a course or hiring a tutor.  Short of that, keep these tips in mind:
(1) read the stem of the logical reasoning questions before reading the questions themselves.
(2) make sure to systemtically determine whether your answer choices violate any of your rules in order to master logic games.
(3) make sure you at least know what the main point of the reading passage is after doing a reading comp. passage before you get to the answer choices.
(4) If you are doing a logic game and get the right answer in (A), don't bother reading the rest of the answer choices.
Most importantly, read the questions carefully - look out for "or" and "and" distinctions and "must" or "could be true" distinctions.

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

49
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: Very Very low LSAC ugpa
« on: December 10, 2008, 02:44:17 PM »
I would suggest signing for a LSAT review course or perhaps hiring an LSAT tutor so you can get as high an LSAT score as possible.  I would also suggest writing an addendum to explain why the GPA was so low.  Then, you can put together an application package with as great recommendations and as great a personal statement as you can and that should provide some help.  Good luck!

50
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: Please help
« on: December 10, 2008, 02:41:29 PM »
If you are trying to get scholarship money, I would definitely wait until the next cycle of applications. I know how frustrating it is after putting so much work into the LSAT preparation but hopefully you will be in better condition for the February LSAT exam and will be first in line when it comes to the next cycle of applications.

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