Law School Discussion

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Messages - AlisaGreenstein

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31
Personal Statement / Re: Personal Statement about Career Switch
« on: January 07, 2009, 02:47:56 PM »
Glad to hear it! Please feel free to send me a copy of the draft if you want someone to take a look at it.  Happy new year!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

32
Recommendations / Re: Past the deadline?
« on: January 07, 2009, 02:43:23 PM »
If Letters of Recommendation are received after the application deadline, the Law School Admission Council will typically not be able to timely match them to your personal application file.  You can, however, contact an individual school to see if it has their own policies regarding accepting such letters (as certain schools even have their own forms for such LORs). 

As a result, although it does not take the LSAC a long time to process the LORs (typically no more than two weeks or so), you should be sure to make sure your recommenders send them in by the deadline so that you don't run the risk of submitting an incomplete file.

Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

33
Recommendations / Re: Discuss LOR before the class ends?
« on: January 07, 2009, 02:35:12 PM »
I would definitely suggest waiting until the end of the semester to ask for the letter of recommendation.  At the beginning of the semester, the professor will not know you well enough on which to render such a letter and if the prof. were to accept on that basis, it might not be a letter that you would really want anyways.  At the end of the semester, however, if the professor accepts, you can be more confident that you will receive a letter of recommendation that is worthy of being included in your application.  Three exams is more than enough of a basis for such a letter - it is the effort you put in along the way that is what will make a difference.  Best wishes for a great semester!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

34
Recommendations / Re: On Line Law -any one know anything about it
« on: January 07, 2009, 02:30:50 PM »
As a mom myself, I can certainly relate to your predicament.  Unfortunately, none of those online law schools are accredited by the ABA, so it would not be worth your time to do any of those programs.  My suggestion is to wait until you can attend an ABA-accredited law school and give it your full attention.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

35
Recommendations / Re: Time or recommendation?
« on: January 07, 2009, 12:05:36 PM »
Unless it is a course that you really want to take or is in some other way going to be valuable to your own educational development, you should focus the time on studying for the LSAT.  Taking the course probably won't make that much of a difference in the professor's mind - it should only be helpful to YOU and in the end, there are probably many other valuable ways to spend your time right now, especially when preparing for the LSAT and law school applications.   I am sure you can get meaningful recommendation letters without this course.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

36
LSAT horror stories / Re: Prompter's cell phone went off.
« on: January 07, 2009, 12:01:00 PM »
That is certainly unfortunate.  You should immediately report this to the LSAT board, if you have not already.

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

37
Studying for the LSAT / Re: LSAT PreP Courses
« on: January 07, 2009, 11:59:18 AM »
There is a lot of variation between different courses.  In the end, it is a personal comfort/fit decision but it is also important to look at the types of practice tests they use.  Some companies skew the practice tests they use so definitely try to look for a company that uses authentic, official LSAT practice exams.  If you are still in doubt after researching them on your own, call the companies and ask to see a copy of their syllabus/sit in a class to get a better idea.  Most of them will be more than happy to let you do this.

38
LSAT horror stories / Re: took practice LSAT (didnt do well)
« on: January 07, 2009, 11:54:59 AM »
The first try is always the hardest but it sounds like you need to try taking another practice test.  Take it in a quiet library or other quiet setting at a time where you can really focus and mentally concentrate on what you are doing, perhaps first thing in the morning when you are wide awake or at another time where you feel ready.  Turn off all cell phones/beepers, etc. and see how much you can get through.  Also - definitely don't guess - the LSAT is all about using reasoned, rational thinking.  Try some sudoku puzzles beforehand to warm up for the Logic Games.  The LSAT is all about practice so after a couple of timed tries, you might get more used to taking the test.  If all else fails, you might want to sign up for a course or hire a private tutor who can help coach you on test-taking strategies.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law   

39
LSAT horror stories / Re: Need some advice
« on: January 07, 2009, 11:49:18 AM »
Although it is discouraging, I would recommend retaking the exam.  Law schools really like to see a higher score.  You can take it a maximum of three times within two years from your first exam.  You might also want to consider taking a commercial review course or hiring a tutor who can help you get a higher score.  If you can, I would also order copies of the exams that you took and concentrate on seeing what you got wrong on those exams and working on improving those areas - that might be a good place to start.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

40
Law School Applications / Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« on: December 18, 2008, 04:30:49 PM »
With less jobs available to the general public and more competition for the jobs that are available, more people decide to go back to school and pursue a law school education in order to be skilled enough to compete for a better position for the future.  You should make sure that you do want to go to law school though, because it is a lot of money and a lot of hard work to invest in a project you are unsure of.  If you love what you do and you are good at it, there will always be jobs for you, regardless of economic conditions.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

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